Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Thinking about getting first moleskin trouser, either in brown or lovat, MTM online. Traditional bespoke moleskin doesn't seem practical for the price. I have a pattern with Luxire that fits really well for dress trousers that I got from measuring bespoke dress trousers. Have had two trousers made that fit quite well.

What adjustments would you make to a dress trouser pattern to make it suitable for moleskin? I am assuming leg should be narrower and less break? Should waist/everything else be the same, or are they worn lower like jeans?

I don't have any chinos that fit perfect to measure (ie Bill's M3s that don't feel quite right)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
27,866 Posts
Thinking about getting first moleskin trouser, either in brown or lovat, MTM online. Traditional bespoke moleskin doesn't seem practical for the price. I have a pattern with Luxire that fits really well for dress trousers that I got from measuring bespoke dress trousers. Have had two trousers made that fit quite well.

What adjustments would you make to a dress trouser pattern to make it suitable for moleskin? I am assuming leg should be narrower and less break? Should waist/everything else be the same, or are they worn lower like jeans?

I don't have any chinos that fit perfect to measure (ie Bill's M3s that don't feel quite right)
There's no reason the moleskin trousers can't be tailored very much like your dress trousers if you like how those are cut. Different makes of moleskin are cut differently. However, your instincts that you may wish to provide a narrower lower leg via a taper and a shorter inseam are in keeping with how many moleskins are cut, so as to offer better utility in the field.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,593 Posts
The rise of moleskin trousers and the leg openings vary dramatically amongst manufacturers. You must choose how you prefer your trousers to fit. I have moleskins from 3 sources. LE, PC and Orvis. They are all 32 waist. I prefer a light break and cuffs. For this I use an inseam of 29 1/2 inches. Here are the rise and leg openings.

LE 10 1/2 "rise. 16" leg opening. Deemed mid rise
Sleeve Wood Dress shirt Collar Khaki


Orvis 11 1/2 "rise. 18" leg opening. Deemed regular rise
Sleeve Wood Font Rectangle Tints and shades


PC 13" rise. 18" leg opening. Deemed high rise
Sleeve Grey Beige Wood Khaki


I much prefer the PC trousers. They fit at my natural waist which is at the top of my belly button. This makes them comfortable, drape well over the lower torso, and the opening softly breaks 1/3 of the way down the vamp, allowing them to settle nicely just above the heel.

The Orvis sit right below my belly button, still cover the torso nicely, and give the same break and vamp/heel coverage as the PC.

The LE are not comfortable in comparison. Sitting in the nether region between my hips and belly button. The smaller leg opening requires an inseam a 1/2" shorter to prevent a full break on the shoes and they do not cover enough vamp for my liking, nor do they hang down low enough on the heel. The more I wear them, the more convinced I am that they need to be turned in. The problem is the pine pair can be swapped out for PC, but I have not found a suitable replacement for the coffee pair.

As a result I find myself eschewing the LE for wear with sports coats, covering their lower lying waistband with a sweater. This makes them look better up top (covered up), but they still feel less comfortable than the others, and don't drape the boots to my preferred liking.

Now there is no rule here, but I would avoid a short rise hip hugger at all costs. There is a practical issue involved beyond the comfort of the fit of high rise to mid rise.
Standing at a urinal, the zipper of a high rise travels down to a comfortable position, the regular rise is adequate, but the mid rise is a bit difficult. Instead of taking out your member easily, comfortably, and being allowed to hang freely, the mid and certainly low rise force you to pull it up and out while pulling down on the crotch seam where the zipper meets to prevent an upward tugging on said member which impedes flow and can cause some retention of urine that can then dribble out when it is safely returned to its relaxed state in your underwear. This requires some extra effort at shaking, milking etc, to be sure there aren't a few drops remaining in the shaft when you are finished. Now for you youngsters in your 20's and 30's this may sound ridiculous. But trust me by the time you get to your 40's and 50's this WILL be a concern of yours.

So take all these factors into account, and use your own judgment. For me PC makes the best fit, Orvis comes in second. Both are similar to my suit and sports coat trousers with which I prefer a 12" rise. Yet I have been forced to go as low as 11 inches for some trousers, or as high as 12 1/2" due to availability. I have had MTM JA trousers made at MWH with 13" rise and love them even if the staff (my son) thought they were ludicrous. I reminded him that they were flannel winter trousers and would always be covered by a waistcoat, so no one would see the "old man" look, but I would get the comfort for myself. But those are outliers. IMO your moleskins should be cut to fit just the same as your preferred dress trousers. You are not wearing them for work in the forge, so make them look like you like your trousers to look, and feel like you like your trousers to feel.

Between those 3 brands alone, you should find a combination that suits you RTW. You can also expand into LLB and O'Connell's for more permutations. BTW. PC wins the best value/dollar award. Just as hefty as Orvis, French fly, stretch waist, well sewn about half the price.

And thanks for the inspiration. You just helped me pick out a nice outfit for todays frigid weather.
Outerwear Coat Dress shirt Tie Sleeve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,666 Posts
^ Well the middle part of momsdoc’s response sure was clinical. Don’t get me wrong—I’m grateful for the detail he provided throughout the entire post. But the section about the effect that various trouser rises have on urination put me into deeper weeds than I had been expecting. Which reminds me of this little ditty I read somewhere long ago:

No matter how you shake and dance
The last drop ends up in your pants.

I use urinals only when I have no choice. Whenever possible, I sit on a toilet seat to pee—yes, just to pee. That way, I avoid any possibility of splashback onto the thighs and/or knees of my trousers. You might not be able to see or feel teeny-tiny urine droplets bouncing back onto your fine trousers once they hit the urinal wall or water surface in the toilet, but that’s what happens. Eliminate splashback—sit down to pee. It sounds funny for a man to do that, but would you rather walk around with microscopic pee drops on your pants all the time? Think about it. Your pride or your pants—pick one. And don’t worry—public restrooms have those toilet seat protectors.

Bonus tip: Momsdoc is so right about how, once you get into your 40s or 50s, it’s impossible—regardless of your trouser rise—to get out every last drop during a wee-wee session. I noticed this inevitable age-related phenomenon myself some years ago, much to my consternation. My solution: after a whizz, I unspool about a 15-inch length of toilet paper, fold it up into roughly a square shape, then stuff it inside the crotch of my briefs. An improvised diaper! It, rather than my underpants, absorbs those errant droplets that are sure to ensue. (If I’m forced to use a urinal, I simply re-use the “diaper” that’s already there. Soon enough I’ll have a chance to replace it with a fresh clean one.) This method may not work if you wear boxer shorts. That’s why I prefer briefs—they hold that toilet-paper diaper in place!

I love how you never can tell what directions a discussion thread will take.
 

·
Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Joined
·
37,088 Posts
^^LOL. Not to prolong a discussion beyond it's natural end point, but as we manly men age through the 50's and 60's and deal with the seemingly inevitable challenges presented by our respective prostrates, don't overlook the value of including Kegel exercises into our daily exercise regimen to eliminate that inevitable and irritating faucet drip! :oops:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
The rise of moleskin trousers and the leg openings vary dramatically amongst manufacturers. You must choose how you prefer your trousers to fit. I have moleskins from 3 sources. LE, PC and Orvis. They are all 32 waist. I prefer a light break and cuffs. For this I use an inseam of 29 1/2 inches. Here are the rise and leg openings.

LE 10 1/2 "rise. 16" leg opening. Deemed mid rise
View attachment 19398

Orvis 11 1/2 "rise. 18" leg opening. Deemed regular rise
View attachment 19399

PC 13" rise. 18" leg opening. Deemed high rise
View attachment 19397

I much prefer the PC trousers. They fit at my natural waist which is at the top of my belly button. This makes them comfortable, drape well over the lower torso, and the opening softly breaks 1/3 of the way down the vamp, allowing them to settle nicely just above the heel.

The Orvis sit right below my belly button, still cover the torso nicely, and give the same break and vamp/heel coverage as the PC.

The LE are not comfortable in comparison. Sitting in the nether region between my hips and belly button. The smaller leg opening requires an inseam a 1/2" shorter to prevent a full break on the shoes and they do not cover enough vamp for my liking, nor do they hang down low enough on the heel. The more I wear them, the more convinced I am that they need to be turned in. The problem is the pine pair can be swapped out for PC, but I have not found a suitable replacement for the coffee pair.

As a result I find myself eschewing the LE for wear with sports coats, covering their lower lying waistband with a sweater. This makes them look better up top (covered up), but they still feel less comfortable than the others, and don't drape the boots to my preferred liking.

Now there is no rule here, but I would avoid a short rise hip hugger at all costs. There is a practical issue involved beyond the comfort of the fit of high rise to mid rise.
Standing at a urinal, the zipper of a high rise travels down to a comfortable position, the regular rise is adequate, but the mid rise is a bit difficult. Instead of taking out your member easily, comfortably, and being allowed to hang freely, the mid and certainly low rise force you to pull it up and out while pulling down on the crotch seam where the zipper meets to prevent an upward tugging on said member which impedes flow and can cause some retention of urine that can then dribble out when it is safely returned to its relaxed state in your underwear. This requires some extra effort at shaking, milking etc, to be sure there aren't a few drops remaining in the shaft when you are finished. Now for you youngsters in your 20's and 30's this may sound ridiculous. But trust me by the time you get to your 40's and 50's this WILL be a concern of yours.

So take all these factors into account, and use your own judgment. For me PC makes the best fit, Orvis comes in second. Both are similar to my suit and sports coat trousers with which I prefer a 12" rise. Yet I have been forced to go as low as 11 inches for some trousers, or as high as 12 1/2" due to availability. I have had MTM JA trousers made at MWH with 13" rise and love them even if the staff (my son) thought they were ludicrous. I reminded him that they were flannel winter trousers and would always be covered by a waistcoat, so no one would see the "old man" look, but I would get the comfort for myself. But those are outliers. IMO your moleskins should be cut to fit just the same as your preferred dress trousers. You are not wearing them for work in the forge, so make them look like you like your trousers to look, and feel like you like your trousers to feel.

Between those 3 brands alone, you should find a combination that suits you RTW. You can also expand into LLB and O'Connell's for more permutations. BTW. PC wins the best value/dollar award. Just as hefty as Orvis, French fly, stretch waist, well sewn about half the price.

And thanks for the inspiration. You just helped me pick out a nice outfit for todays frigid weather.
View attachment 19400
Regarding the LE trousers you have -- why not just limit their wear to boots only? Maybe I'm out there on left field with this, but it seems to me that too short of a break (or even no break) looks just fine with boots.

I have horrible OCD about my trousers having a perfect break, which leads me to have trousers I wear only with boots, and trousers I'll wear with either. I can't live with excessive break, so any with that issue go immediately to the tailor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
^ Well the middle part of momsdoc's response sure was clinical. Don't get me wrong-I'm grateful for the detail he provided throughout the entire post. But the section about the effect that various trouser rises have on urination put me into deeper weeds than I had been expecting. Which reminds me of this little ditty I read somewhere long ago:

No matter how you shake and dance
The last drop ends up in your pants.

I use urinals only when I have no choice. Whenever possible, I sit on a toilet seat to pee-yes, just to pee. That way, I avoid any possibility of splashback onto the thighs and/or knees of my trousers. You might not be able to see or feel teeny-tiny urine droplets bouncing back onto your fine trousers once they hit the urinal wall or water surface in the toilet, but that's what happens. Eliminate splashback-sit down to pee. It sounds funny for a man to do that, but would you rather walk around with microscopic pee drops on your pants all the time? Think about it. Your pride or your pants-pick one. And don't worry-public restrooms have those toilet seat protectors.

Bonus tip: Momsdoc is so right about how, once you get into your 40s or 50s, it's impossible-regardless of your trouser rise-to get out every last drop during a wee-wee session. I noticed this inevitable age-related phenomenon myself some years ago, much to my consternation. My solution: after a whizz, I unspool about a 15-inch length of toilet paper, fold it up into roughly a square shape, then stuff it inside the crotch of my briefs. An improvised diaper! It, rather than my underpants, absorbs those errant droplets that are sure to ensue. (If I'm forced to use a urinal, I simply re-use the "diaper" that's already there. Soon enough I'll have a chance to replace it with a fresh clean one.) This method may not work if you wear boxer shorts. That's why I prefer briefs-they hold that toilet-paper diaper in place!

I love how you never can tell what directions a discussion thread will take.
I'm 39. Yay for learning what I have to look forward to...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain
Before going the MTM route for moleskins, you may check out what Cordings has to offer. Their trousers are comparable to Hertling and are offered in a nice cut. This is a pair of mine in camel. Offered with button fly, side adjusters (not D-ring), and brace buttons. Rise measures right at about 11" and the leg opening at ~8.5"; fantastic trousers.

Product Sleeve Comfort Wood Collar
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone, that took an interesting twist haha

I think I will take 1" off the leg width and keep same rise + natural waste as my dress trousers

If I am back in London in the near future I'll give cordings a try. However OTR probably won't cut it as my inseam is typically too long (38.5" for dress trousers)
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top