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Hmm I got an alert from this thread, I think I saw the pre-edit post.

Good luck on the jacket surgery, you cheeky bastard.

I've seen the light on extended shoulders, your jacket seems to have them and I dig how it looks. I used to think of them as "unnatural and grotesque", but that doesn't actually matter, only what silhouette someone is trying to achieve.

I dropped off my cloth at my tailor and emphasized extended shoulders and a full chest. I'm not sure how well the lightweight cloth will respond to more structure, but we'll see.

Albert Camus did this look well. (Lifted from SF thread).


Great photos of one of my favourite writers. But do remember, Camus was a fairly tall man for the France of his times, five-nine or five-ten
 

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Hmm, that'd be average height today I think.

Does that really matter though for dressing? I'm the same height as Camus so I've never given consideration to this.
The size of the shoulders has greater or lesser impact overall with height. If you are tall, extending the shoulders of a jacket a bit will not affect the balance of shoulders to height very much, but if you are short, it will -- the jacket will look boxy and broader on your frame. And this effect is exacerbated if you are both short and have broad shoulders.

The length of your torso, the length of your arms and legs and the width of your shoulders should all contribute to a balanced look. If one of these dimensions is exaggerated, then the balance is off. Unfortunately, not all of us are lucky enough to have perfect balance -- we are all off by smaller or larger amounts! Usually a good tailor can make adjustments so that these departures from balance are ameliorated.

Personally, I have been very lucky in that my proportions are very close to being in balance. One of my legs is slightly shorter than the other, but only by a few millimetres. And my shoulders are slightly broader than ideal, less than an inch. Nevertheless, clothes off the rack fit me very well, and I need alterations (other than sleeve and trouser leg length) only rarely. And I am doubly fortunate to have my brother and long-time collaborator in tailoring, the redoubtable Mr Vang, who can do wonders with alterations in jackets and trousers.

One detail about Camus: His head is somewhat big relative to his body and height. The extended shoulders on his jacket lessen this disparity. Similarly large heads have been seen with other well-known people like Cary Grant, and most extremely, Max von Sydow (two of my favourite actors). With von Sydow, this becomes clear when he is standing next to other people -- you can see how big his head is relative to others (although this is not relevant when we consider how he is dressed). In Grant's case, you can see how big an impact this can make without the protection of a well-cut jacket in Alfred Hitchock's film North by Northwest, when Grant is putting on new clothes toward the end of the film. His shoulders are narrow, and his head is pretty big, relatively speaking. Grant was a natty dresser, and wore his clothes well, but he could afford fine tailors as well. Here's Grant, and below him, von Sydow:


Stomach Flash photography Neck Gesture Elbow

Forehead Nose Face Chin Eyebrow
 

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The size of the shoulders has greater or lesser impact overall with height. If you are tall, extending the shoulders of a jacket a bit will not affect the balance of shoulders to height very much, but if you are short, it will -- the jacket will look boxy and broader on your frame. And this effect is exacerbated if you are both short and have broad shoulders.

The length of your torso, the length of your arms and legs and the width of your shoulders should all contribute to a balanced look. If one of these dimensions is exaggerated, then the balance is off. Unfortunately, not all of us are lucky enough to have perfect balance -- we are all off by smaller or larger amounts! Usually a good tailor can make adjustments so that these departures from balance are ameliorated.

Personally, I have been very lucky in that my proportions are very close to being in balance. One of my legs is slightly shorter than the other, but only by a few millimetres. And my shoulders are slightly broader than ideal, less than an inch. Nevertheless, clothes off the rack fit me very well, and I need alterations (other than sleeve and trouser leg length) only rarely. And I am doubly fortunate to have my brother and long-time collaborator in tailoring, the redoubtable Mr Vang, who can do wonders with alterations in jackets and trousers.

One detail about Camus: His head is somewhat big relative to his body and height. The extended shoulders on his jacket lessen this disparity. Similarly large heads have been seen with other well-known people like Cary Grant, and most extremely, Max von Sydow (two of my favourite actors). With von Sydow, this becomes clear when he is standing next to other people -- you can see how big his head is relative to others (although this is not relevant when consider how he is dressed). In Grant's case, you can see how big an impact this can make without the protection of a well-cut jacket in Alfred Hitchock's film North by Northwest, when Grant is putting on new clothes toward the end of the film. His shoulders are narrow, and his head is pretty big, relatively speaking. Grant was a natty dresser, and wore his clothes well, but he could afford fine tailors as well. Here's Grant, and below him, von Sydow:


View attachment 87322
View attachment 87323
I had no idea Cary Grant had such narrow shoulders and frame! Awesome, thanks for sharing. My build is the exact same as his, but I've a smaller head.

I think I'm also fortunate to mostly be proportionate. I've longer legs and arms, but I can easily fit into OTR. Thigh size can be an issue for me due to weight lifting, going up 2 sizes and taking the waist in often works for me.

As for shorter men wearing extended shoulders, I've always seen Ralph pull off exaggerated silhouettes pretty well. This doesn't look boxy or broad to me. Granted, we can't see the entirety of his figure, and Ralph seems to pull off mostly anything.


 

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In the second (lower) photograph, Ralph is wearing a DB jacket (possibly a dinner suit, I can't make out the facings on the lapel) which, in my view, is far too broad in the shoulders. The effect is exaggerated by the button stance which seeks to emphasize the look of broad-shoulders-narrowing-to-the-waist that was popular in the first half of the last century -- a look I thoroughly dislike. In fact, I have a project for the future in which I shall take all my DB jackets and blazers, and either remove the two wide top buttons or transplant them to align with the lower buttons (this is the look seen in Navy DB uniform jackets, which I love). But others may like this look. Ralph Lauren is 5'-6", so the broad shoulders look even more exaggerated and out of proportion in the lower picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
...Camus was a fairly tall man for the France of his times...
I'm the same height as Camus...
Camus.
I had a cow once who kept calling his name. A small farm in Maine where I grew up, mostly sheep. We had a German Shepard. Not a dog, an actual German shepard, right after the war, you could get them cheap. He wouldn't shake hands, just saluted and wondered why we had no interest in occupying New Hampshire. We sent him off, Argentina, probably a bad idea.
 

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We sent him off, Argentina, probably a bad idea.
An extraordinarily bad idea, Peaks. A profoundly abysmal one. This sheep-herd, or shepherd (or a descendant of the English family of Shepards -- related to the German Shepards, perhaps?), and indirectly you and your pals, were collectively responsible for the horrible reign of terror by the Argentine junta in the 1970s and the thousands of desaparecidos. Once a Nazi, always a Nazi, I say. As though France wasn't bloody well enough!
 

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In the second (lower) photograph, Ralph is wearing a DB jacket (possibly a dinner suit, I can't make out the facings on the lapel) which, in my view, is far too broad in the shoulders. The effect is exaggerated by the button stance which seeks to emphasize the look of broad-shoulders-narrowing-to-the-waist that was popular in the first half of the last century -- a look I thoroughly dislike. In fact, I have a project for the future in which I shall take all my DB jackets and blazers, and either remove the two wide top buttons or transplant them to align with the lower buttons (this is the look seen in Navy DB uniform jackets, which I love). But others may like this look. Ralph Lauren is 5'-6", so the broad shoulders look even more exaggerated and out of proportion in the lower picture.
I used to dislike this look, it looked "unnatural" to me.

Now I enjoy the look, it's brash and has a masculine silhouette.

Do you mean converting 6-button DBs to something like a 4x2 or 4x1?
 

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I used to dislike this look, it looked "unnatural" to me.

Now I enjoy the look, it's brash and has a masculine silhouette.

Do you mean converting 6-button DBs to something like a 4x2 or 4x1?
If I remove the buttons and leave them off, then it becomes a 4-button system (4x1 or 4x2 depending on the particular jacket). If I move the buttons sideways to be closer to each other and aligned in a column with the other buttons (two vertical rows when the lower ones are buttoned), then they will remain a 6-button system (again, 6x1 or 6x2).

As for the masculinity of the jacket's cut, I am not concerned about such things, and they do not give me any pleasure or satisfaction. At my age, I am pretty sure of who I am and don't have the need to project that sense of masculinity through my clothes. But that is not to say others can't have a different take on such things. You must dress as you please, LOL.
 
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