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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, trying to get some advice on the fit of this suit for my wedding. It's a 40L Lazio from Suitsupply. For reference, I'm 6' 1/2'' 180lbs.

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- Any huge red flags that I can't fix by tailoring it?
- What should I focus on? I feel the chest area is a tad big and the back has some extra fabric but both of these should be fixable.
- Any point in trying a 38? Pants for sure wouldn't fit as these are just right but I've got a feeling the jacket would be too tight as well.

Thanks a bunch for the help!
 

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Congrats, one of the better first efforts from SS to show up on the Forum. Contrary to your OP, the back has NO extra fabric. Classic SS, too much waist suppression out the gate. Have your tailor "let out" each back 3/4 seam 1/2-3/4"; it will not only eliminate some of the horizontal creasing on the back, but it will likely fix the front pulling as well. The tailor will let you know if that will similarly address the horizontal pulling near the collar; that's a very standard alteration any tailor should be able to do if necessary. The sleeves are near perfect; no need for changes there. But please don't size down; IMO that would be a disaster.
 

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When looking at the side view it looks like the hem is on a slant where the front is high and the back is low. At the upper back you have these huge folds. Both are indicators that the 'balance' is off. Balance is the relation of the front and back in relation to the person wearing the jacket as to how they stand. Nobody stands the same. By pulling the back up at about shoulder blade height till the hem is level the coat should fit much better. The excess is cut off at the top from shoulder tip to the other. The neckline is where most will be cut off. If one shoulder is lower than the other (common) this is the time to correct that. Also, the front armholes should be adjusted, too. The outer tips should be let out, and the neck taken in. This will provide a little bit more room in the chest and making a straighter roll line instead of the curved one there now. (This is a lot of major work, but coat will fit and look much better.)
 

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Any chance you could return and size up. Me thinks your looking at it backwards by suggesting sizing down. I doubt there is enough fabric to let out to correct the several issues with that jacket. Would be much easier and probably less costly to tailor if you size up. Taking in trouser is much easier to accomplish than major surgery to a jacket.
 

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Thanks! How about the shoulders? Something felt off and the left shoulder is a bit less than half an inch longer than the right. They feel a tiny bit off but I'm not sure.
I don't think you can improve much on the shoulders; you definitely can't size down here, it's really as small as you can go before your shoulders (deltoids) start poking out your upper sleeve. The part I think "works" for the jacket as-is is that, when you look from the front, the shoulder line (from collar to sleeve) is nice and smooth, and that's what the eye picks up. Hard to better that. I'd stick with what you've got, if you're looking for anything more you're really looking beyond what SS can offer. But... if you find yourself in the future looking at 'more' bespoke, you may find yourself happy with a higher armhole (than in this particular suit). Oh, last thing. You may want to consider a shirt with a trimmer sleeve. Some of the extra fabric can be seen in the irregularity along the suit sleeve. Not a big deal, but just if you care about this relatively small detail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The outer tips should be let out, and the neck taken in. This will provide a little bit more room in the chest and making a straighter roll line instead of the curved one there now. (This is a lot of major work, but coat will fit and look much better.)
Thanks for your reply everyone, really helpful advice I hadn't really considered.

Could you please explain this part a bit more? I think I got the rest but I'm not sure what needs to be done with those two.
 

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There is front to back balance and then there is lateral balance, which some tailors call Crook or Straight. For lateral I'm saying this coat needs to be crooked. If you draw a vertical line through the coat the two shoulder points would be moved out, and straight is the opposite. Actually, I think I'm saying that wrong. If you draw a line across the shoulder seam, then rip the seam you can now move the whole front piece towards front, which means the inlay at the armhole is opened up and used to match the back and the front excess is pressed away. Grandad said that the fronts can be balanced by using one pin per side. Which is true. This also puts the roll line in its proper place. Roll line/bridle. With the one pin I've combined all three per side, left and right.

Sometimes sales men recommend the wrong model. The alterations tailor should know which model will give him the least amount of work and, more important, the best fit for you.

To better understand this there are a couple books on the internet that explain with pictures. One of these is Clarence Poulin's book (for got the name. Another is by David Carlin, an alterations book.
 

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There is front to back balance and then there is lateral balance, which some tailors call Crook or Straight. For lateral I'm saying this coat needs to be crooked. If you draw a vertical line through the coat the two shoulder points would be moved out, and straight is the opposite. Actually, I think I'm saying that wrong. If you draw a line across the shoulder seam, then rip the seam you can now move the whole front piece towards front, which means the inlay at the armhole is opened up and used to match the back and the front excess is pressed away. Grandad said that the fronts can be balanced by using one pin per side. Which is true. This also puts the roll line in its proper place. Roll line/bridle. With the one pin I've combined all three per side, left and right.

Sometimes sales men recommend the wrong model. The alterations tailor should know which model will give him the least amount of work and, more important, the best fit for you.

To better understand this there are a couple books on the internet that explain with pictures. One of these is Clarence Poulin's book (for got the name. Another is by David Carlin, an alterations book.
These two books?:

Tailoring_Suits_the_Professional_Way_by_Poulin_1973.pdf

AlterationsMW.pdf

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