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What most honest people would do, go back to goodwill and try to find another pair or, buy new and keep for the rest of your life.;)
I was only kidding. I'm glad that LL Bean is implementing this policy.

I saw someone at Sears return a bunch of old rusty Craftsman tools that looked like garage sale buys just to get brand new tools. That kind of abuse makes me mad.
 

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Damn millennials ruined a good thing. The internet has a generation believing everything should be free.
This comment is wildly off-base. Rather than denigrating a particular age group unfairly, why don't you ask a retail store manager about the age of typical return policy abusers. You may actually learn something.
 

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This comment is wildly off-base. Rather than denigrating a particular age group unfairly, why don't you ask a retail store manager about the age of typical return policy abusers. You may actually learn something.
Sorry if I offended you. It was meant to be funny, crusty old man-like. I'd check with a store manager, but I'd have to walk five miles in the snow, each way in my old worn out Bean boots that they won't replace anymore thanks to those damn kids.
 

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A close friend worked at LL Bean for quite a number of years and it was always common knowledge that the "old grumpy" types were the ones "abusing" the policy.

I personally don't consider it abuse, rather it was just taking advantage of the policies and benefits. I found that email to be incredibly offensive as a customer and this may have been the final nail in the coffin for what was once a great company.
 

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A close friend worked at LL Bean for quite a number of years and it was always common knowledge that the "old grumpy" types were the ones "abusing" the policy.

I personally don't consider it abuse, rather it was just taking advantage of the policies and benefits. I found that email to be incredibly offensive as a customer and this may have been the final nail in the coffin for what was once a great company.
Offensive, interesting.
I look at it this way: Obviously their warranty did not imply that you were getting a free lifetime supply of whatever object you purchased from them. No company can afford that.
The warranty was given in terms of "We won't bind you to a bunch of fine print terms so long as you don't act in a way that would mean we have to." Guess who wasn't the gentleman in that situation. Look at the widely published story this Christmas season of a woman returning a dead Christmas tree to Costco- the few who think life owes them everything will ruin gentlemen's agreements between retailers and consumers for everyone.
 

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Offensive, interesting.
I look at it this way: Obviously their warranty did not imply that you were getting a free lifetime supply of whatever object you purchased from them. No company can afford that.
The warranty was given in terms of "We won't bind you to a bunch of fine print terms so long as you don't act in a way that would mean we have to." Guess who wasn't the gentleman in that situation. Look at the widely published story this Christmas season of a woman returning a dead Christmas tree to Costco- the few who think life owes them everything will ruin gentlemen's agreements between retailers and consumers for everyone.
Agreed. Decency is part of the social contract. When people draw more than their fair share from the local well, everybody loses.

Selfishness abounds!

Cheers,

BSR
 

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Always looking for the "basic good" in the other guy/gal has become decidedly more difficult in recent years. I am becoming convinced that perhaps people are not intrinsically honest at their respective core! :(
 

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I had one pair of boot “lowers” replaced in 50+ years of owning Bean boots. I had worn holes in the rubber. My son-in-law recently got a replacement pair for boots his grandmother had given him as a young teen. Service above and beyond is one reason I’m a Bean customer. Service no longer above and beyond could change my loyalty.
 

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I had one pair of boot "lowers" replaced in 50+ years of owning Bean boots. I had worn holes in the rubber. My son-in-law recently got a replacement pair for boots his grandmother had given him as a young teen. Service above and beyond is one reason I'm a Bean customer. Service no longer above and beyond could change my loyalty.
And you think it's fair to wear a pair of Bean boots for 20+ years and then seek to have them replaced under the LL Bean Warranty program? It just doesn't seem like a sustainable business model fro LL Bean. :icon_scratch:
 

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And you think it's fair to wear a pair of Bean boots for 20+ years and then seek to have them replaced under the LL Bean Warranty program? It just doesn't seem like a sustainable business model fro LL Bean. :icon_scratch:
Actually, I think the company was OK with the original owners returning boots for repair or return, even after many years. It was the jerks buying them at yard sales (or acquiring them in other ways than buying them new) and then turning them in for free replacement that ruined the admittedly generous program. It's up to each individual company to decide whether their desire to be known for world class service will overshadow expenses and allow them to continue such programs. I won't abandon Bean when they offer products that represent value to me, but I may not view their service model with the same degree of admiration. Bean says they will work with customers who have service issues with their products, so I kind of think that in most cases, they will continue to support products well beyond the stated one-year period, as long as you can prove you bought them yourself.
 

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I am becoming convinced that perhaps people are not intrinsically honest at their respective core! :(
There are certainly a lot of individual people who are honest through and through. The vast majority, I like to think. But what generalizations, if any, can we make about the human race as a whole?

Imagine that a person from another planet in another galaxy were to visit us here on Earth. Imagine, further, that dishonesty doesn't exist on the visitor's planet. No cheating, no stealing, no lying, no fraud of any kind whatsoever. It's a place of 100% honesty 100% of the time.

Now imagine that some earthlings have volunteered to show this extra-terrestrial person around. The Grand Tour. Are there any earthly things that our visitor, being from a planet where dishonesty doesn't exist, might find utterly baffling? A few, I imagine. Here's but a partial list:

Door locks
Bicycle locks
Padlocks
Lock boxes
Safes
Bank vaults
Car alarms
Surveillance cameras
Keypads on doors
Locksmiths
Security guards/Night watchmen
Armored vehicles
The FBI
Dye packs
Police officers
Police stations
Police detectives
Most highway patrol officers
Border patrol guards
House alarms
Airport luggage inspectors
Luggage X-ray machines
People who operate luggage X-ray machines
Security wands
Security software
Keys
Motion detectors
Companies that make and sell the above security devices
Criminal courthouses
Prosecutors
Criminal defense attorneys
Bail bondsmen
Judges, clerks, bailiffs and everyone else who works in the criminal court system
Government regulations
Bureaucrats who administer government regulations
Auditors
Prisons
Prisoners
Jails
People who work in prisons and jails
Plastic security tags on merchandise

Now-What conclusions do you think our visitor from another galaxy might come to concerning the human race in general? After getting an eyeful of everything in our world related in some way to protecting ourselves and our property from each other, what might go through his mind? "Wow. What is it with these people? What would their planet and their lives be like if there were no such thing as dishonesty here? About 90% of these funny humans would have to find other work for starters. Which means most of them would not find other work. Which means these silly earthlings would probably be better off continuing to be dishonest at worst or suspicious of each other at best. Better for their economy."

The human race: it's weird. In defense of our species, I'd tell the visitor that if 100% of the houses in a town have door locks, that doesn't mean that 100% of the population is dishonest. It means that 100% of the people have made the rational decision to protect themselves from the potential trespasses of the very tiny part of the population that probably shouldn't be trusted. [Still, a tiny part of several billion earthly inhabitants is a worrisome number. But I wouldn't say that. Let him do the math himself.]

Then I'd say, "And what if we humans are an untrustworthy lot? So what if we aren't exactly God's gift to the cosmos? At least we invented the ice cream sundae. And Monday night football! Do you have those things where you come from, Mr. Spock? Huh? And that red Tesla roadster that we just launched-pretty cool, right?" And with that, I would rest my case. My expensive leather case. Which is equipped with a combination lock.
 
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