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How long can a fused suit last with every day wear and proper care?

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I've only very recently learned about the construction of a suit and the differences between a fused and canvassed suit. As a tall and skinny guy, I've found Charles Tyrwhitt suits to be a great fit for me as their British cut complements my figure, and at a great price point when on sale. I found that the initial 3 suits and blazer that I bought are fused. When I upgraded and bought one of their "luxury" half-canvassed suits, I felt an immediate difference. The canvas made the suit noticeably thicker and draped better, which led me to wish I had strictly bought only half-canvassed from the beginning.

In terms of care, I've read to dry-clean suits once a year at most and to use a garment cleaner when necessary. Also to specifically avoid steaming the fused chest/lapel region to prevent premature bubbling. Given that I alternate between 4 suits for work, what would you guys expect to be the lifespan of the fused suits. If I can get 10+ years, that would be great. Thank you.
 

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The answer to that question is unknowable given available information.

But a fused suit may not have a lifespan very different from one with a half, or full canvass depending upon many factors other than the construction.
 

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With proper care and proper wear, you can have a fused suit for a very long time. The lifespan of a half-canvas suit will be no different than the life of a fully fused suit. This is because a half-canvas suit is made just like a fused suit, plus there is a layer of canvas in the upper half. Any problems that may arise from a fused suit are just as likely with a half-canvas suit.
 

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Given that I alternate between 4 suits for work, what would you guys expect to be the lifespan of the fused suits.
Don't worry about the lifespan of your Tyrwhitt suits. There's no point, inasmuch as you have them now. (Your horses have already escaped, so it's a little late to sweat the quality of the lock on your barn door.)

Just wear the hell out of the suits for as long as they look good, however long that may be. Then get rid of them and replace them with fully-canvassed suits if suit longevity will still be a major concern of yours. (Who knows? Perhaps in three or four years you may have a different job, and you'll need to wear a suit only a few times a year.)

If I can get 10+ years, that would be great.
Yes, I agree that would be great (assuming you don't gain weight). Still, looking ahead ten years may be wise when you are pondering things such as investments, retirement income, career options, buying a dream house, funding the kids' college educations, etc. However, pondering whether or not you can get a good ten years of wear out of some fused suits might represent a bit more anxiety-inducing planning than the suits deserve. Why don't you shoot for three or four years, then consider any length of time after that to be a pleasant bonus? They're only suits.

P.S. It's probably reasonable to want and expect an expensive, truly bespoke suit to last ten years. But a fused off-the-rack suit? It will last as long as it lasts. Take it one wearing at a time. Enjoy sunrises and sunsets; those will be around a long time.
 

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Bottom Line; Purchase what you can afford and above all else, have it fit to you by someone who knows what they are doing.

Always hang your clothing up and a good brushing goes a long way towards keeping your clothing looking presentable. (After you learn the proper technique for brushing.)

Do not dry clean too often.

I have given away suits that I have become too large for and they were in wearable, serviceable condition after several years of wear. Some old, lower line, Hart Schaftner Marx suits and jackets come to mind. I remember some Stanley Blacker fused suits that gave me excellent service for five years plus. (Rotating four suits and a couple of jackets and blazers.)

It was a big day when I purchased my first Hart Schaftner & Marx Gold Trumpeter! I still have that one just for old times sake,....
 

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I'll just say that I had a fused navy blazer I wore the hell out of for about 20 years before it became so shabby that I discarded it. I never had the slightest problem with the fusing (bubbling, etc.). I've had other fused jackets that I got good, long service from. The antipathy to fusing is blown out of all proportion in the menswear forum subculture.
 

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I'll just say that I had a fused navy blazer I wore the hell out of for about 20 years before it became so shabby that I discarded it. I never had the slightest problem with the fusing (bubbling, etc.). I've had other fused jackets that I got good, long service from. The antipathy to fusing is blown out of all proportion in the menswear forum subculture.
+1!
 

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I'll just say that I had a fused navy blazer I wore the hell out of for about 20 years before it became so shabby that I discarded it. I never had the slightest problem with the fusing (bubbling, etc.). I've had other fused jackets that I got good, long service from. The antipathy to fusing is blown out of all proportion in the menswear forum subculture.
My take on fused suits is this -- if it's 100% wool and looks/feels/fits nice, and is cheap, go for it. Buy them when your favorite cheap suit manufacturer has their big sales.

But don't spend real money on them.
 

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One of my first suits was a Calvin Klein suit I got from Macy's for $300. It was fused, but 100% wool.

The fit was great, got tons of compliments, and lasted me about 5 years, with at least twice a week wear.

I had to throw them out not because of fused construction, but the wool was just wearing thin, and my tailor told me that there is little point in trying to repair them at that point.

If it's reasonably priced, made of wool, fit is good, and reasonably comfortable, I see nothing wrong with fused suit.
 

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One of my first suits was a Calvin Klein suit I got from Macy's for $300. It was fused, but 100% wool.

The fit was great, got tons of compliments, and lasted me about 5 years, with at least twice a week wear.

I had to throw them out not because of fused construction, but the wool was just wearing thin, and my tailor told me that there is little point in trying to repair them at that point.

If it's reasonably priced, made of wool, fit is good, and reasonably comfortable, I see nothing wrong with fused suit.
And that illustrates the typical limiting factor; given a competently constructed suit made by any method, the cloth is likely to wear out before the construction gives way.
 

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Tried some fused coats on from decades ago they felt like a board in back two boards in front. They were absolutely horrible. Todays fused coats are considerably better. Although, a hand shaped coat cannot be a fused one. The shaping of the cloth with an iron removes the ability of being able to add fuse. The canvas foundation is usually two different kinds of canvas and they can be at different angles and different weights. Pad stitching can be loose to tight and other variables. The list of what can be done can create an incredible magnificent coat. Of course the Rolls Royce version has that price, too. A mass produced non fused coat does not have all of these bells and whistles. It really comes down to the why's of why the coat is made the way it is. Buy accordingly and you may find a nice coat fused or not.
 

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The more money you spend on a suit the less time it will last. The trousers wear first and if it's made out of fine quality wool it will last much less time than a cheaper wool/polyester blend and also wrinkle more.
 

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The more money you spend on a suit the less time it will last. The trousers wear first and if it's made out of fine quality wool it will last much less time than a cheaper wool/polyester blend and also wrinkle more.
I'm sorry, but that's completely untrue.

Price isn't a determinant of anything except how much you paid for it.
 

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Some bespoke has been around for three generations. Good quality wool last and last and last.
Change that last sentence to,, "Good quality wool can last and last and last." and I'm in complete agreement. Evidently it has become fashionable for some high-end RTW, and even some tailors, to use ultra fine fiber wool that can be delicate, which is likely what member phr33dom had in mind with his generalization. But not all ultra fine fiber cloth is delicate as exampled by Esocorial wool, and even many lesser cloths. My tailor made me a suit of lighter weight, very soft merino lambs wool almost 30 years ago which despite it's softness and weight has worn extremely well.

The source is of the fiber is one factor, but how it's spun and woven can be of equal or even greater significance, which is why broad generalizations can't be used.
 

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Another reason for shorter life span is that fibers that are short ends up in cheaper cloth.

Flanderian, yes, should have put can last in there. Luck of the draw when it does.
 

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The more money you spend on a suit the less time it will last. The trousers wear first and if it's made out of fine quality wool it will last much less time than a cheaper wool/polyester blend and also wrinkle more.
Other people's experiences may differ from mine regarding suits made from 100% wool. I no longer have suits made from 100% wool because of the short life span of the trousers which wear and split at the seat due to numerous cycles of sitting down on office chairs, car seats etc. The material is not robust enough for regular use. I'm only 140 pounds. A tweed would obviously last longer but for suits for office wear a wool material containing 25% to 33% polyester is the sweet spot for me between feel and longevity.
 
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