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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,
I'm taking a practice LSAT in February then the real deal next September. I want to start studying a little now and will hopefully pick up a couple books of logic games and logical reasoning problems this month.

I'm just wondering if any of you gentlemen (or women) have any tips for prepping for the LSAT.

Any tips on studying or just general law school discussion would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Mark
 

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I taught the Stanley H. Kaplan LSAT course for about ten years, and the best advice I can give you is to take it. Start early, and really apply yourself. I can tell you that some of my students showed significant improvements in their scores.

If you are planning now for a test almost a year from now you should be in good shape.
 

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I feel like the games section is where the most improvement can be made the quickest, but with a year in advance, you should be set. Remember, most schools are taking your highest score now, so don't worry too much about taking it more than once.

Good luck, I'm at Vanderbilt Law now and loving it. Can't recommend it highly enough.
 

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Your school admission goals also play a big part in it. If you aren't trying to go to a top school, and you don't need an absolute top score, you can make time by throwing away one of the games and doing well on the three that remain. On the other hand, that pretty much means you're not going to a top tier school.

I guess this is more of a test taking than a test prep strategy, and you have plenty of time for that. For now, the more questions, reading passages, and logic games that you see, the better your chances are on test day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I used the Princeton Review book, back when online or even computer-based courses were non-existent, and I got a 167.

And no, I didn't go to law school. I chose another path and now I'm a CPA. :)
Congrats! 167 is a commendable score. I know this sounds like I am a very confused individual but I am actually also working on completing the educational requirements so I can take the CPA exam. I currently work at an accounting firm and hopefully will be able to find somewhere to draft financial statements or do tax returns for a couple of hours a week while attending law school.

Your school admission goals also play a big part in it. If you aren't trying to go to a top school, and you don't need an absolute top score, you can make time by throwing away one of the games and doing well on the three that remain. On the other hand, that pretty much means you're not going to a top tier school.
I'm hoping to apply to a handful of mid to lower tier 1 schools. I don't have the best grades so while I am trying to pull them up I am largely banking on a great LSAT.
 

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Did you have to take both the LSAT and the GMAT?
The GMAT is required to enter the MBA program. At Georgia, you have to apply to both the law school and the business school. The program is designed so that the first year is the first year of law school (where I am now), the second year is the first year of the MBA program, and the third and fourth years are electives from both programs.

Many schools that offer dual degree programs allow you to apply for the MBA program after you start the law program. Although most students follow the "standard" four-year program, I know of a student here who did not apply to business school until her 2L year had started.

If you're interested in such a program, I would recommend contacting the admissions offices of both the law school and the business school of the universities at which you intend to apply.
 

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Is there any way I can talk you out of law school? I am a 3L at a pretty good mid-Atlantic/northeast law school and there are NO jobs. Last summer lots of firms who take on 10-30 summer associates and who normally make offers to all of them were only making offers to 25%. I am in the top 1/3 of my class and I can't land an offer to save my life.

Also, law school sucks!!! My school has a top 20 business school on the other end of the campus. I drive by it on my way to and from school. All of the students are out drinking and having a good time 5 days a week. It's a big cocktail party! They are "networking" while I am killing myself. If I had it to do over again I would get an MBA and be done with it.
 

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I know this sounds like I am a very confused individual but I am actually also working on completing the educational requirements so I can take the CPA exam.
The CPA exam is much easier now that you can do each section individually.

I used the Gleim online courses for my CPA, CMA, and CFM, because they look exactly like the computerized tests. That reduced a lot of test anxiety for me.

Different instruction styles work better for different people, but I can definitely say that you need to pace yourself and don't try to take them all in one testing window. Also, don't take the easiest one first, or the hardest one. I took BEC first and passed it on the first try. I nearly lost credit for it because it took so long to pass the other three parts. If you take the hardest one first and don't pass, you might be tempted to give up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Does anyone here practice corporate law? I've been poking around looking at the different specialties and this seems to be the most appealing to me. I am just wondering if anyone has any experience or has heard any rumors about the type of work corporate lawyers do.

Thanks for all the great posts so far and the ones that are sure to follow,
Mark
 

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Does anyone here practice corporate law? I've been poking around looking at the different specialties and this seems to be the most appealing to me. I am just wondering if anyone has any experience or has heard any rumors about the type of work corporate lawyers do.

Thanks for all the great posts so far and the ones that are sure to follow,
Mark
From what I understand, corporate work (transactions) lags when the economy suffers (fewer mergers, etc.).

Admittedly, I don't practice much in that area so I could be mistaken. It seems an area that is more sensitive to the current economy.

However, if you were to start law school in the near future, you would probably graduate and hit it during an upswing. Corporate attorneys make some good money, depending on where you practice. I know some partners who practice in that area for Biglaw firms, and they do very, very well. :icon_smile_wink:

I prefer a less transactional and more litigious practice. Litigators always have work to do and people are always suing each other, especially during recessions. :cool:

As to the original question, I have heard that Powerscore has excellent prep materials for the LSAT.
 

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Does anyone have any opinions on becoming a Patent Attorney? A friend who's in a part-time evening law program is considering taking the Patent Bar. Apparently one of her classmates is working as a Patent Agent (having passed the Patent Bar but not yet having a law degree), and he's making a very nice salary working part time while finishing school.
 

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Is there any way I can talk you out of law school? I am a 3L at a pretty good mid-Atlantic/northeast law school and there are NO jobs. Last summer lots of firms who take on 10-30 summer associates and who normally make offers to all of them were only making offers to 25%. I am in the top 1/3 of my class and I can't land an offer to save my life.

Also, law school sucks!!! My school has a top 20 business school on the other end of the campus. I drive by it on my way to and from school. All of the students are out drinking and having a good time 5 days a week. It's a big cocktail party! They are "networking" while I am killing myself. If I had it to do over again I would get an MBA and be done with it.
Quoted for accuracy. I don't post much here any more, I will tell you this much, I passed the July 2007 NY bar. Top 50 school. Published Law Review article. Over a year experience. And my unemployment kicks in next week. Do not go in to law unless you are getting a full ride (or mommy and daddy are paying) or get in to a Top-10 school. There are no exceptions. If you get a JD you are most likely going to practice law, forget the "opening doors crap". Even if you do get a "BigLaw" job you will be working 60+ miserable hours a week and after three years will burn out and have little to no practical experience. At the going rate of $35-$50k tuition per year + living expenses you need to earn six-figures coming out to make it even remotely worthwhile, especially if you are in a major city. This is all after spending 3 pretty awful years learning crap that has little to no application in your prof. career.
 

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Part of me always seems to be trying to think of ways to toll the statute of limitations on a potential cause of action against the guidance counselor who told me a BS in mathematics would let me take the patent bar (it won't, by the way).

I need to sit down and figure out how many of the 40 hours I'd need to take it sometime. I'll bet it's not as much as I'd think.
 

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Is there any way I can talk you out of law, too? I'm going into medicine. A glut of lawyers looking for work won't be good for me.

Whatever you do, all the best. Sounds like you're doing the right thing preparing far in advance... I started studying for the MCAT 2 weeks before I took it, 8 hrs a day. I did great, but that probably has more to do with me generally being good at tests.
 

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My school has a top 20 business school on the other end of the campus. I drive by it on my way to and from school. All of the students are out drinking and having a good time 5 days a week. It's a big cocktail party! They are "networking" while I am killing myself. If I had it to do over again I would get an MBA and be done with it.
I can assure you that the job search for recent business school graduates isn't much better.

In my opinion, the only way an MBA works is if you graduate with a BA or BS, work for a few years and start to learn the ropes in the business world, and THEN go back and get your MBA.

Going straight from undergrad to graduate school leaves you with an advanced degree and no clue what you want to do with it.
 

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^+1. Business school is clearly more fun than law school, but an MBA is far more useless than a JD (unless of course you have amazing previous experience - in which case you are ultimately hired for that experience and the signaling tha b-school gives, rather than anything inherently obtained during those two useless years).
 
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