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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello -
I am going to have a kilt made, and want a jacket and waistcoat to accompany it. The standard tweed jacket that is available has the sort of costumey-looking faux 18th century cuffs, which strike me as being a little, well, "faux". I saw a recent photo of Prince Charles in a kilt and his jacket and waistcoat were made along traditional suit coat lines, standard 4 button cuffs, albeit cut higher for the kilt.

What is the opinion of the commonly available kilt jackets I mentioned? I have not seen any other cuts of jackets available. Is bespoke the only option? Any thoughts?

Thanks very much.
 

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I think an Argyle jacket (in either tweed or black wool) is pretty standard...vintage cuffs and all.




I did notice a more modern jacket at



The site says it can be made in a variety of fabrics. Maybe this style is more to your liking?
 

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Hello -
I am going to have a kilt made, and want a jacket and waistcoat to accompany it. The standard tweed jacket that is available has the sort of costumey-looking faux 18th century cuffs, which strike me as being a little, well, "faux". I saw a recent photo of Prince Charles in a kilt and his jacket and waistcoat were made along traditional suit coat lines, standard 4 button cuffs, albeit cut higher for the kilt.

What is the opinion of the commonly available kilt jackets I mentioned? I have not seen any other cuts of jackets available. Is bespoke the only option? Any thoughts?

Thanks very much.
Here you go. This is where HRH The Prince of Wales gets his from.
 

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Anyone who intends to wear the kilt should definitely read this book, So You're Going to Wear the Kilt, by J. Charles Thompson, from cover to cover:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/So-Youre-Going-Wear-Kilt/dp/185217126X

It will correct a raft of misconceptions and help avoid painful (and potentially costly) mistakes. It even has instructions on how you turn regular garments, such as a blazer for instance, into a proper form of jacket to be worn with a kilt. Very practical and pertinent information, delivered with a dollop of humor and a ton of common sense.
 

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Anyone who intends to wear the kilt should definitely read this book, So You're Going to Wear the Kilt, by J. Charles Thompson, from cover to cover:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/So-Youre-Going-Wear-Kilt/dp/185217126X

It will correct a raft of misconceptions and help avoid painful (and potentially costly) mistakes. It even has instructions on how you turn regular garments, such as a blazer for instance, into a proper form of jacket to be worn with a kilt. Very practical and pertinent information, delivered with a dollop of humor and a ton of common sense.
It's a decent book, but I wouldn't take it as gospel.
 

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Aaaargh!What we have here is the infamous "Prince Charlie" jacket and waistcoat,so beloved of Scots at weddings and black tie events.I don't know if this was designed as a joke by some misanthropic tailor but I think it looks horrendous, who would want to wear a waistcoat that was that height above the waist and exposing so much shirt?Whenever I see people wearing them they are always pulling at the the damned thing to get it to cover more of the shirt!Destroy them all I say!Also BL and I know from bitter experence trying to get a kilt to stop dropping over your knees is a full time job!A tailor told me that the only way to do it is to have your kilt made to measure-follow the lead of the PoW and go to a firm such as he uses.-Sorry about the rant but it's only 8.30 am here and I'm still only on my first cup of coffee!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Whereas this is more the thing, I believe. I like the brass buttons on gray - I wouldn't have thought to do that. Many thanks for the links and advice.

 

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I'm not trying to criticise anyone and please correct me if I am wrong here but isn't it bad form to wear a kilt if your family does not officially have one? I know that there are some generic tartans out there which can be used under certain circumstances. From my understanding it is akin to using a coat of arms or crest which does not belong to you.
 

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Ugh. That's awful.
Well, most of the problems with that iteration of kilt kit can be fixed: The kilt is worn much too low. It should hit just above the center of the kneecap. If the waistcoat is still too high in relation to the top of the kilt after making that adjustment, then the waistcoat can be let out at the shoulders a bit. Kilts are normally made with leather straps and buckles to adjust for girth variables. They can be repositioned if necessary to ensure a proper fit. Depending on the body type of the wearer, I don't believe that adding braces would be that outrageous, if needed, even though some purists might disapprove. They won't be seen under waistcoat and doublet.

The shirt sleeves are somewhat too long, which can easily be corrected by a smart tailor or obtaining a better-fitting shirt. One should, however, prior to a picture being taken, or leaving the house for that matter, ensure that the shirt's placket is in line with the center of the kilt's tartan pattern, which is centered on the front apron in a well-made kilt. Also, the wing collar is one over and one under. Need to make up one's mind about that, hopefully in favor of both under.

When I got my kit, I opted for the Regulation Doublet, which harks to the regimental style. The Prince Charlie was developed in the Lowlands by the English-leaning Scots as an adaptation of the English tailcoat. Nothing wrong with it per se. Just a matter of taste. However, the Regulation Doublet tends to have a bit longer and more flattering line.

The one glaring faux pas in this case is wearing a belt with a waistcoat. Not done.

I'm not sure why my suggestion to read So You're Going to Wear the Kilt was questioned as a source without the offer of a better source, but oh, well.
 

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I'm not trying to criticise anyone and please correct me if I am wrong here but isn't it bad form to wear a kilt if your family does not officially have one? I know that there are some generic tartans out there which can be used under certain circumstances. From my understanding it is akin to using a coat of arms or crest which does not belong to you.
There is no tartan police enforcing tartan wear, if that's what you mean by "a kilt if your family does not officially have one?" Since we are all related in some fashion, genetic niceties are really not that significant. All the tartans we see now were invented in the early 19th century, except for MacGregor, perhaps, and maybe a couple of others, and assigned to families by the infamous "Sobieski Stuart Brothers". So, all this concern about legitimacy is rather precious at best.

Of course, if you have an association by lineage with a particular tartan and you like how it (or one of its several variations - hunting, ancient, modern, muted, weathered, even "yule") looks, then by all means wear that. I found my Macdonough family tartan, finally, and overcame the trepidation that I might look a bit "Christmas wrapped" with its green and red, but finding the "bottle-green" used took it out of that realm:icon_smile_wink:

There are also county tartans, in the case of Ireland; country tartans; military service tartans (the U. S. Navy's is very handsome); organization and even state tartans. The relatively new California tartan is particularly good looking (better than any of the online picture renditions I found).

https://www.statesymbolsusa.org/California/CAstatetartan.html

So, there's a tartan for everyone, just about, but no real reason why one can't wear any tartan they want. After all, if questioned, you can always say that it's a tartan from me beloved mum's great grandfather, which is actually the case with me. Who's going to "check"?
 

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Well, most of the problems with that iteration of kilt kit can be fixed: The kilt is worn much too low. It should hit just above the center of the kneecap. If the waistcoat is still too high in relation to the top of the kilt after making that adjustment, then the waistcoat can be let out at the shoulders a bit. Kilts are normally made with leather straps and buckles to adjust for girth variables. They can be repositioned if necessary to ensure a proper fit. Depending on the body type of the wearer, I don't believe that adding braces would be that outrageous, if needed, even though some purists might disapprove. They won't be seen under waistcoat and doublet.

The shirt sleeves are somewhat too long, which can easily be corrected by a smart tailor or obtaining a better-fitting shirt. One should, however, prior to a picture being taken, or leaving the house for that matter, ensure that the shirt's placket is in line with the center of the kilt's tartan pattern, which is centered on the front apron in a well-made kilt. Also, the wing collar is one over and one under. Need to make up one's mind about that, hopefully in favor of both under.

When I got my kit, I opted for the Regulation Doublet, which harks to the regimental style. The Prince Charlie was developed in the Lowlands by the English-leaning Scots as an adaptation of the English tailcoat. Nothing wrong with it per se. Just a matter of taste. However, the Regulation Doublet tends to have a bit longer and more flattering line.

The one glaring faux pas in this case is wearing a belt with a waistcoat. Not done.

I'm not sure why my suggestion to read So You're Going to Wear the Kilt was questioned as a source without the offer of a better source, but oh, well.
The belt was the part that made me wince. My comment about the book is simply because I remember some of it being tongue-in-cheek from what I remember.
 

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I'm not trying to criticise anyone and please correct me if I am wrong here but isn't it bad form to wear a kilt if your family does not officially have one? I know that there are some generic tartans out there which can be used under certain circumstances. From my understanding it is akin to using a coat of arms or crest which does not belong to you.
If you can trace your family linage back to a particular highland clan then by all means wear that tartan, but there is no prohibition on what tartans a person can wear only that it be worn with the respect its due. A common question that comes up from time to time and is answered here: https://www.xmarksthescot.com/

Oldpagan
 

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An important part of the cut of the jacket is its purpose. Just as Saxons have sports coats, suit jackets, morning coats, dress coats and military jackets, so too do Scots. Ask yourself what sort of event you will most likely wear your kilt to. Then ask what you would wear if going in Saxon-wear. Get that style of jacket (suiting, buttons, etc) in a kilt-length cut.
 

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You can wear any tartan you want, as long as its not resticted or private. You are unlikley to find those commercially available anyway.

You can even wear highland attire without a drop of Scottish connections. Not sure why one would want to if they didnt, but it happens.

Please just wear it correctly and tastefully.

The POW is an excellent role model on how to wear and accesorize a kilt, they guy above in the rental is not.

Forget the "Prince Charlie" and go with a regulation or other doublet for evening/semi-formal or formal occasions. (I would skip the jabot ie Austin Powers style frilly cravat, though)

I am personally a big fan of tartan trews with dinner jackets or smoking jackets for evening wear. No reason why non-Scots can do this too.

Commercialy available day wear jackets tend to be whats called an "Argyle" and come in basic tweeds or black with sliver buttons like an eveing jacket. Both have a bit too much military detailing, cuffs, shoulder cords, etc for my taste. The latter is often recomended for both day and evening wear by changing the tie and accesories, but does neither well and is rather lame. The "Craille" jackets advertised more and more are taking a page from the POW (and other well bred Scots) and simplifying daytime jackets. These can be good choices.

If you can afford it, MTM jackets from reputable kiltmakers/tailors are the best bet. You can get the fabric, sizing, and styling you want. And you'll be able get grain rather than satin on your evening lapels.

Your standard OTR fair, not unlike rentals is usually just available in regular lenths. This is a problem for many tall men (Americans) especially in the Prince Charlie. Its usually compounded by wearing the kilt too low on the waist. Our friend in the photo is a prime example.

For evening/formal occasions, please wear your best formal shirt and self tie black bow. For daytime whether tweed or a worsted, match the formality of the tie as you would with a blazer or sport jacket and avoid matching tartan ties. You can also just wear an open collar shirt, layer on a sweater, or whatever the formality dicates just as with trousers.

For real casual I like this rugby shirt: https://www.getshirty.com/getshirty...GBY+SHIRT&pf_id=PAAAIANHKPBEKLCN&dept_id=3107
But a plain rugby is probably more tasteful.

You will also see old guys at American Scottish games wearing their old US army (or other branch) uniform shirts with decoartions above their kilt. I dont get this: they were not in a UK Highland regiment, nor was the kilt part of their US uniform, so why are they combining them? Please avoid this nonsense, even if you are a decorated hero. Feel free though to wear your full uniforn and decorations at the appropriate venue, and always have the lapel pin of you highest award on the lapel of your day kilt jacket and mini medals on your formal evening kilt jacket if you so choose. Just as you would/could with the analogous civilian gear with trousers.
 

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You can wear any tartan you want, as long as its not resticted or private. You are unlikley to find those commercially available anyway.

You can even wear highland attire without a drop of Scottish connections. Not sure why one would want to if they didnt, but it happens.

Please just wear it correctly and tastefully.

The POW is an excellent role model on how to wear and accesorize a kilt, they guy above in the rental is not.

Forget the "Prince Charlie" and go with a regulation or other doublet for evening/semi-formal or formal occasions. (I would skip the jabot ie Austin Powers style frilly cravat, though)

I am personally a big fan of tartan trews with dinner jackets or smoking jackets for evening wear. No reason why non-Scots can do this too.

Commercialy available day wear jackets tend to be whats called an "Argyle" and come in basic tweeds or black with sliver buttons like an eveing jacket. Both have a bit too much military detailing, cuffs, shoulder cords, etc for my taste. The latter is often recomended for both day and evening wear by changing the tie and accesories, but does neither well and is rather lame. The "Craille" jackets advertised more and more are taking a page from the POW (and other well bred Scots) and simplifying daytime jackets. These can be good choices.

If you can afford it, MTM jackets from reputable kiltmakers/tailors are the best bet. You can get the fabric, sizing, and styling you want. And you'll be able get grain rather than satin on your evening lapels.

Your standard OTR fair, not unlike rentals is usually just available in regular lenths. This is a problem for many tall men (Americans) especially in the Prince Charlie. Its usually compounded by wearing the kilt too low on the waist. Our friend in the photo is a prime example.

For evening/formal occasions, please wear your best formal shirt and self tie black bow. For daytime whether tweed or a worsted, match the formality of the tie as you would with a blazer or sport jacket and avoid matching tartan ties. You can also just wear an open collar shirt, layer on a sweater, or whatever the formality dicates just as with trousers.

For real casual I like this rugby shirt: https://www.getshirty.com/getshirty...GBY+SHIRT&pf_id=PAAAIANHKPBEKLCN&dept_id=3107
But a plain rugby is probably more tasteful.

You will also see old guys at American Scottish games wearing their old US army (or other branch) uniform shirts with decoartions above their kilt. I dont get this: they were not in a UK Highland regiment, nor was the kilt part of their US uniform, so why are they combining them? Please avoid this nonsense, even if you are a decorated hero. Feel free though to wear your full uniforn and decorations at the appropriate venue, and always have the lapel pin of you highest award on the lapel of your day kilt jacket and mini medals on your formal evening kilt jacket if you so choose. Just as you would/could with the analogous civilian gear with trousers.
Lace jabot and cuffs would be worn as part of the highland version of white tie.The best type of jacket to wear with this is called a"Sherrefmuir coat"and has a gillie collor and is designed to be worn open with or without a white doeskin waistcoat.It can be in normal barathea or (to my mind)look much better in velvet.
 
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