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I would be very happy to wear the first suit, lapels and all. The second suit, I've just never been too fond of single breasted jackets with peak lapels,....And yes, I do believe the second suit's lapels are a bit much.

Great images,
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I like the color of the first suit, along with the cut and the jetted pockets; however, it would take me twenty minutes to go to the rest room with the buttons on the trousers of the second suit.
Frankly, I view them as a bit of an affectation. I've enjoyed going through Esquire's vintage archives, and in them are many ads for Talon zippers informing the well-heeled that they can now request them from their tailors and reap very well specified benefits compared to the then traditional buttons.

I would be very happy to wear the first suit, lapels and all. The second suit, I've just never been too fond of single breasted jackets with peak lapels,....And yes, I do believe the second suit's lapels are a bit much.

Great images,
Yes, I think that dark brown glen check is marvelous! Another example of brown cloth that would be perfectly fine for most business.
 

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Larger lapels seem to be the current trend. The problem is that one might invest a small fortune in a jacket that will be dated in a few years. I think it best to reign in the extravagance a bit when having a suit tailored.

Button fly high waist trousers with belt loops? No thanks. Remove the loops and wear braces.

Love the fabrics in the photos.


Cheers,

BSR
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Larger lapels seem to be the current trend. The problem is that one might invest a small fortune in a jacket that will be dated in a few years. I think it best to reign in the extravagance a bit when having a suit tailored.

Button fly high waist trousers with belt loops? No thanks. Remove the loops and wear braces.

Love the fabrics in the photos.

Cheers,

BSR
A broader lapel is part of their house cut which is an adaptation the Neapolitan cut. But while broader than some current fashion, it has always remained harmonious as in the jacket worn by head cutter Jung Yul Park below. But the two jackets I featured seem to go a bit overboard.

 

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Larger lapels seem to be the current trend. The problem is that one might invest a small fortune in a jacket that will be dated in a few years.
Especially when a short trip to your nearest thrift/consignment store could reward you with any amount or ridiculously wide lapel garments. There is no shortage of such sartorial anachronisms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Especially when a short trip to your nearest thrift/consignment store could reward you with any amount or ridiculously wide lapel garments. There is no shortage of such sartorial anachronisms.
But is it truly an anachronism?

I would argue rather that it is the current skinny-look lapels that are the anachronism where the mass-market fashions of 5 and 10 years ago have filtered down to general American RTW, whereas most of the world had abandoned them at least that long ago.

And while anyone might prefer lapels a bit narrower, and this or that, the disparity between current American RTW and what's seen here reveals more about how out of touch current American RTW is with greater style. Stylish men have never embraced it, and the better dressed avoid it. I consider AAAC member Bespokewrinkles to be among the best dressed of our congregation, and certainly don't consider the stylish clothing made for him by Steed to be the slightest bit anachcronistic.

 

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But is it truly an anachronism?

I would argue rather that it is the current skinny-look lapels that are the anachronism where the mass-market fashions of 5 and 10 years ago have filtered down to general American RTW, whereas most of the world had abandoned them at least that long ago.

And while anyone might prefer lapels a bit narrower, and this or that, the disparity between current American RTW and what's seen here reveals more about how out of touch current American RTW is with greater style. Stylish men have never embraced it, and the better dressed avoid it. I consider AAAC member Bespokewrinkles to be among the best dressed of our congregation, and certainly don't consider the stylish clothing made for him by Steed to be the slightest bit anachronistic.

Am I mistaken or has this gentleman gone by another name on this forum or the other forum who has also had garments made for him by a well know Italian house as well ? I could be wrong in which case I would like to be corrected. That aside I believe I have a Gieves OTR jacket in that same pattern, may not be the same fabric but that is not relevant here. What is relevant is lapel width which was in part the subject of the post and I personally find this lapel to be a bit too wide as one who does not favor the current trend of narrow lapels. Lower the notch and it becomes anachronistic, otherwise a nice jacket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Am I mistaken or has this gentleman gone by another name on this forum or the other forum who has also had garments made for him by a well know Italian house as well ? I could be wrong in which case I would like to be corrected. That aside I believe I have a Gieves OTR jacket in that same pattern, may not be the same fabric but that is not relevant here. What is relevant is lapel width which was in part the subject of the post and I personally find this lapel to be a bit too wide as one who does not favor the current trend of narrow lapels. Lower the notch and it becomes anachronistic, otherwise a nice jacket.
If member Bespokewrinkles has used another handle, I am unfamiliar with it. He does also publish a blog, which you can find here -

https://bespokewrinkles.com/

When he originally posted the photo above of this Steed jacket here in AAAC we had a discussion concerning lapel width, and both he and I agreed we might prefer them a bit narrower, as indeed they are on most of his other notch lapel jackets. But the issue really isn't might these lapels be more desirable were they slightly narrower, but rather whether wider as contrasted to narrower lapels are anachronistic. And the photo simply serves as an example of contemporary bespoke tailoring where wider lapels are employed to support my contention that they are most definitely not anachronistic.
 

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Wide lapels can be cut narrower as time changes. Narrow lapels is another story.
Of course it depends on how close you want to come to the top button hole/ boutonniere ____ and on a 3 roll 2 to the first button at the waist. Not much room.
I too wonder how lapels can be narrowed when there is a buttonhole or two in the way.
 

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I too wonder how lapels can be narrowed when there is a buttonhole or two in the way.
It depends on what is available. Back in the early sixties lapels where down to two inches, maybe less. Don't remember if any rtws even put real buttonholes up there. Like sleeve buttonholes - fake. If you are more fashion forward a buttonhole doesn't need to be cut. Just put in stitches like there is one. As far as flowers go use a flower holder that pins to the lapel.

My lessons were not about judging a coat by lapel width and other style choices. They were about shaping the jacket so that it looks good on the person no matter what style choices they make. Rtw coats are not shaped for the person, therefore, can look ugly. True tailoring is about making, shaping garments that is a part of the person. This means fit the personality and his body no matter what styles chosen so that it is an extention of what he wants to portray, therefore a better art than rtw that doesn't really fit. Fit has a lot of meanings than just the body.
 

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"... the disparity between current American RTW and what's seen here reveals more about how out of touch current American RTW is with greater style. Stylish men have never embraced it, and the better dressed avoid it."

A tailor, believe it was this person, Jeff (https://tuttofattoamano.blogspot.com/) wrote that the rtw clothing business changes very quickly. It changes according to what people are buying. As soon as a" style" wanes in sells they do not make it. They keep a very close eye on the cash register. The business is all about money and there workers stay employed to keep the gravy train moving. The few who want what is liked here do not bring in enough money for the large companies to make for them. They make what is popular.
 
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