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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok I'm a total newbie so don't yell at me yet!

I only started to notice the difference between flimsy thin ties and nice thick quality ones. I always thought there were two different types, the polyester type, and the silk type. lol.

So I am guessing a 7-folded tie is pretty good? Any other guide lines?
 

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Ok I'm a total newbie so don't yell at me yet!

I only started to notice the difference between flimsy thin ties and nice thick quality ones. I always thought there were two different types, the polyester type, and the silk type. lol.

So I am guessing a 7-folded tie is pretty good? Any other guide lines?
There are also wool and linen ties. :)
 

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Ok I'm a total newbie so don't yell at me yet!

I only started to notice the difference between flimsy thin ties and nice thick quality ones. I always thought there were two different types, the polyester type, and the silk type. lol.

So I am guessing a 7-folded tie is pretty good? Any other guide lines?
I've seen some cheap 7-fold ties before.

First, try holding the tie from one end to see if it hangs straight (without twisting). If it does, that means it is cut along the bias (a good thing).

Also, look at the back and unfold the fabric a bit, if you see a slip-stitch (a small thread with a loop hanging down) that is another indication of a quality tie.

If I like the pattern, and the tie isn't a piece of junk, I'll buy it. I get plenty of positive comments on no-name brand ties - probably more than I do on my Talbott ties.
 

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In many cases, price can be a pretty good differentiator of quality. In other words, don't expect to buy top quality when you spend $50 on the Daniel Cremieux special at Dillards. There are exceptions of course, as very good quality ties can be had from time to time at places like Neiman Marcus Last Call or Filene's Basement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In many cases, price can be a pretty good differentiator of quality. In other words, don't expect to buy top quality when you spend $50 on the Daniel Cremieux special at Dillards. There are exceptions of course, as very good quality ties can be had from time to time at places like Neiman Marcus Last Call or Filene's Basement.
so if my most expensive tie is $29.99 that's a bad thing right? :(
 

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The better woven silk ties (which are generally heavier) are made in Italy and by hand, though some very good hand made ties are being made in China as well. There were other discussion threads about the Chinese quality issue, but some of the better names make them there and make sure their manufacturing standards are employed. So, if your tie is hand made, you're generally in good shape in addition to the other indicators listed above.

BT
 

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so if my most expensive tie is $29.99 that's a bad thing right? :(
Personally, I wouldn't worry about price.

I don't think I've ever spent much money on ties. I typically frequent places like TJ Maxx and Marshall's and pick up ties that I like and that I know are of good quality.

I mean, I have some Tommy ties, which aren't great ties or anything, but I like the pattern, so I wear them.
 

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I'd look at a few things, first is the biasing, meaning the tie will have some stretch to it. Also you should see some extra thread from the slip stitch that closes the back of tie, which usually hangs down either in a loop or down behind the facing of the tip of the tie. This is because when you tie a tie you pull on it and stretch it, assuming it's biased correctly. The thread that closes the tie doesn't stretch however, so if there isn't any extra thread for the enclosure it'll snap and you'll tie will open. I typically consider a four fold of better quality if it has two layers of interfacing running along the inside of the tie. You can open it up a bit and pull back the lining on the tip to see if it's one or two layers in there. Also, make sure the tip has a nice point and comes evenly. A poor tipped tie is never good. Also, woven silk is normally considered higher quality than printed silk, so is silk with a better hand.

and usually seven fold is considered higher quality. most important, if you like it and it makes a nice knot it's a good tie.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't worry about price.

I don't think I've ever spent much money on ties. I typically frequent places like TJ Maxx and Marshall's and pick up ties that I like and that I know are of good quality.

I mean, I have some Tommy ties, which aren't great ties or anything, but I like the pattern, so I wear them.
+1 and this is...great advice!
 

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Could someone possibly link a picture featuring the loop in a slip stitch? I'm having trouble visualizing it and looking at a few of my ties has only confused me a bit more. It would particularly helpful to me as I'm a frequent thrift store shopper, so discerning quality for brands I don't know is a skill I'd like to have. I can do it with most garments, but less well with ties.
 

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Marcus, If youre shopping at thrift stores The sure fire way to pick good ties is, only buy the ones made in italy. It will be hard to go wrong on that route.
Cosmo
 

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In many cases, price can be a pretty good differentiator of quality. In other words, don't expect to buy top quality when you spend $50 on the Daniel Cremieux special at Dillards. There are exceptions of course, as very good quality ties can be had from time to time at places like Neiman Marcus Last Call or Filene's Basement.
Sorry but that is just utter nonsense! Some of the best quality ties available in Europe cost no more that $30. And I've bought what have turned out to be pieces of crap for $60.
Price in my experience is not an indicator of any sort whatsoever.

RGR, go by look and feel alone. Nothing else, not even brand name.
 

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One of the best feeling and wearing and looking ties I own is from a place called Andrew's Ties in Milan I got for 25 or 30 dollars retail. It's a great tie, better than zegna and armani ties that retail at over 120.

The tie was very well made as described before, the price was no indicator of quality
 

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In all fairness, I think that price can be a rough estimate of quality, just as in other items of clothing. That said, you can always find extremely pricy junk and very reasonably priced quality.

If you're at the store, try tying it there and see how the knot looks and how well it drapes. I personally prefer woven silk ties because I like how they knot. If you're going to spend some serious cash on a few nicer ties, make sure that they are versatile.

Just my opinions...
 

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I often buy silk ties when I go to Italy, but, to be frank, they are generally not as good as English ones.

My favourite ties are all made by Turnbull & Asser. They are beautifully made, with a lining, and tie perfectly - the knot never slips. They are expensive - around £70 - but the quality is outstanding.
 

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One thing I did not hear mentioned is to look for the sides to roll, not be creased. This indicates being hand made and hand pressed as opposed to some machine mass producing neckwear and just pressing the whole thing flat.
 

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Sorry but that is just utter nonsense! Some of the best quality ties available in Europe cost no more that $30. And I've bought what have turned out to be pieces of crap for $60.
Price in my experience is not an indicator of any sort whatsoever.

RGR, go by look and feel alone. Nothing else, not even brand name.
Thanks for those kind, gentlemanly words My Lord.

In the U.S., at retail, $30 might buy you a Nautica tie. Read the original poster's question. In the U.S., unless you are thrifting or shopping at one of the discount outlets I referenced in my OP, $30 buys you a junk tie that knots horribly and looks like its made out of satin. Period.

Perhaps you have a different perspective on quality, and you are entitled to it. I was giving my opinion, as were you.

Note I didn't reciprocate your classy behavior by referencing your post as nonsense.
 

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In all fairness, I think that price can be a rough estimate of quality, just as in other items of clothing. That said, you can always find extremely pricy junk and very reasonably priced quality.

If you're at the store, try tying it there and see how the knot looks and how well it drapes. I personally prefer woven silk ties because I like how they knot. If you're going to spend some serious cash on a few nicer ties, make sure that they are versatile.

Just my opinions...
Exactly. My original post said in many cases price can be a good indicator, but there are exceptions.

I would be willing to bet for example, that a Borrelli tie will be better quality than a Nautica or Hilfiger or Jos. A. Bank tie 99.9% of the time.
 
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