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Good day, Gentlemen,

I am reading a book of one of Soviet authors called Julian Semenov. He states that it was fashionable among British nobility to wear well worn, but still in good shape, shoes. I wonder if it is true or one of the myths created by the author. To some extend it seems to be true because good leather on older shoes will develop a “character”, if looked after properly…

Thanks.
 

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uum...I don't see how an everyday occurrence like that can be a myth. Most people who own good quality shoes continue wearing them as they wear out, nobility included. No myth involved.

Or are you suggesting that if this statement (not myth) is not true then the nobility in Britain changed their shoes at the first sign of wear and tear?
 

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+1. I agree w/the Earl. Nobility or not, most of us who purchase quality shoes, can be found wearing them 20, plus years later...and they generally look to have been well cared for! :)
 

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uum...I don't see how an everyday occurrence like that can be a myth. Most people who own good quality shoes continue wearing them as they wear out, nobility included. No myth involved.

Or are you suggesting that if this statement (not myth) is not true then the nobility in Britain changed their shoes at the first sign of wear and tear?
I'm thinking the same thing.

The better the shoe, the longer it should last if properly maintained.

Perhaps the author's goal was to convince the proletariat that they really didn't need new shoes (during a shortage) or that they did need new shoes (during a surplus)?
 

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Good day, Gentlemen,

I am reading a book of one of Soviet authors called Julian Semenov. He states that it was fashionable among British nobility to wear well worn, but still in good shape, shoes. I wonder if it is true or one of the myths created by the author. To some extend it seems to be true because good leather on older shoes will develop a "character", if looked after properly…

Thanks.
Always have the footman wear them in first.
 

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This reminds me of a text that was circulating a while back and is attributed to the Odessa News though I daresay this may be apocryphal.

"The English officer is least of all an officer. He is a rich landowner, house owner, capitalist or merchant and only an officer incidentally.

He knows absolutely nothing about the services and is only seen on parades and reviews. From the professional point of view he is the most ignorant officer in Europe. He enters the services not to serve but for the uniform, which is magnificent.

The officer considers himself irresistible to the fair-haired, blue-eyed English ladies. The English officer is a beautiful aristocrat, extremely rich and an independent sybarite and epicure. He has a spoilt, capricious and blasé character and loves pornographic literature, suggestive pictures, recherché food and strong drink.

His chief amusements are gambling, racing and sports. He goes to bed at dawn and gets up at mid-day. He is usually occupied with two mistresses simultaneously; one a lady of high society and the other a girl from the opera or ballet.

His income runs into several thousands, and often tens of thousands, per year, of which he keeps no account; being incapable of keeping accounts. The pay he receives from the government hardly suffices to keep him in scent and gloves.

English officers, especially the young ones, do no work of any kind. They spend their days and nights in clubs noted for their opulence."


Needless to say most of my fellow cadets felt the text to be largely aspirational though the more cynical thought the journalist must have infiltrated a Guards mess.
 

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Needless to say most of my fellow cadets felt the text to be largely aspirational though the more cynical thought the journalist must have infiltrated a Guards mess.
ROFLMAO...aspirational indeed!!!:icon_smile_big: :icon_smile_big:

Of course the Soviets had the utmost respect for the Prussians.
Perhaps the Russians would have had more respect for our officer corps if their experience wasn't based on our latest engagement with them, namely, the Crimea.....which was, as we all know, full of fops, purchased commissions, glory hunters. All mostly second sons to the gentry of course looking to make a name for themselves. And some rather gorgeous,dashing young men in Hussars uniforms....very tight overalls don't you know! :icon_smile_wink:
 

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I was rding one day and came upon a rider in the british UP (universal Purpose ) saddle.
That was enough to 'spur' a conversation, that saddle one I've wanted for sometime in between my cyclical finances.
that's polite for being broke ;o)
My second observation were his boots; with an anntiqued patina no amount of multiple coloured cremes could fake.
" Nice boots!" I commented. " yes, thankyou. They were my grandfather's, in India. I felt ever so lucky inheriting his tack AND his feet"
 

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I'm thinking the same thing.

The better the shoe, the longer it should last if properly maintained.

Perhaps the author's goal was to convince the proletariat that they really didn't need new shoes (during a shortage) or that they did need new shoes (during a surplus)?
I would agree, even if I was royalty and could afford new shoes every day, why would I want to break in a new pair all the time :confused:
 

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You are overlooking the glaring exception of Captain Corcoran, Commander of H.M.S. Pinafore. As he explained, he is not an officer solely because of his relations to a peer, but can hand, reef, and steer (unlike The Rt. Hon. Sir Joseph Porter, KCB, First Lord of the Admiralty, who generally dislikes the winds inherent in the commanding a ship)
 

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It's not a myth, because . . .

. . . nothing is "as comfortable as an old shoe." At least not since 1825 in the North Country:icon_smile_wink:
 

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"The English officer is least of all an officer. He is a rich landowner, house owner, capitalist or merchant and only an officer incidentally.

He knows absolutely nothing about the services and is only seen on parades and reviews. From the professional point of view he is the most ignorant officer in Europe. He enters the services not to serve but for the uniform, which is magnificent.

The officer considers himself irresistible to the fair-haired, blue-eyed English ladies. The English officer is a beautiful aristocrat, extremely rich and an independent sybarite and epicure. He has a spoilt, capricious and blasé character and loves pornographic literature, suggestive pictures, recherché food and strong drink.

His chief amusements are gambling, racing and sports. He goes to bed at dawn and gets up at mid-day. He is usually occupied with two mistresses simultaneously; one a lady of high society and the other a girl from the opera or ballet.

His income runs into several thousands, and often tens of thousands, per year, of which he keeps no account; being incapable of keeping accounts. The pay he receives from the government hardly suffices to keep him in scent and gloves.

English officers, especially the young ones, do no work of any kind. They spend their days and nights in clubs noted for their opulence."
How does one apply for one of these jobs?
 

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^Allow me to echo Will's query..."How does one apply for one of those jobs?" I must have served in the wrong country's military service. I was an officer and, in my case, they threw me one of perfectly good airplanes several times; they made me run around in the wild, trying to avoid capture and eating all manner of detritus, that good manners prevent me from detailing in these fora; they crash landed my helicopter; for four years of my service, every three days or so, I took a freight elevator 60 to 120 feet below the Missouri landscape to work in an ICBM launch control center, secured with a five and a half ton blast door. I won't tell you about the launch crew that was trapped in that electronic high tech tomb for five days, when the 10" diameter pins securing the blast door wouldn't retract and they couldn't open the door.
........and those are just the good times. You mean to tell me that life can get any better than that!

Now, I'll ask again, "how does one apply for one of those jobs" in the British military? ;)
 
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