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I would like to add my "two cents" to this post, for what it is worth. I do all of my own alterations on clothing using an inexpensive sewing machine ( a new $75.00 sewing machine is more than enough for the job). I started doing so about 6 months ago. I have developed my skills to the point that I can remove a center vent, slim the waist of a suit jacket and adjust sleeve length (the most time intensive alteration). This is a skill that quickly improves with practice. The good thing is that every suit is constructed exactly the same way so you improve through repetition. I thrift my entire wardrobe. The only shortcut I take is when closing up a jacket lining. I haven't learned a way to do so expertly with a machine so I use "Stitch Witchery" hot press stitching tape to quickly and invisibly do so. It works!

Buy some cheap but quality items from a thrift shop and practice on them. At best, you will have some nice, perfectly tailored items to add to your wardrobe at very low cost. At worst, you'll have some throwaway items that offered good practice. Here are some of my self-altered suits and sportcoats. The money I saved on altering just one or two garments paid for my sewing machine. If you like to thrift menswear, this reduces the cost of building a quality wardrobe to peanuts. Try it, you'll like it!

Clothing Outerwear Shoulder White Product

This is a thrifted sportscoat I paid $13.00 for. I removed the rear center vent and slimmed the waist.
Outerwear Shirt White Dress shirt Tie

Cheap seersucker sportcoats always fit like a sack. I removed the rear center and slimmed the body here as well.
 

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Good photography. No cell phone aimed at a tooth-paste splattered mirror for you.

However, I would caution anyone new to tailoring to spend even a nickle on a machine. Most jacket tailoring requires the precision only a steady hand holding a threaded needle can achieve. I speak of altering cuffs, reattaching sleeves after shoulder adjustment and, one you mention, resewing lining. The glue thing you used is a rube move. You seem hung up on removing center vents, why's that? A machine's useful for long straight lines, narrowing pant legs, fabricating garment bags maybe. Otherwise, a good light, needle, steady hand and a ball game on the radio is all you need.
I agree! I don't pretend to be an accomplished tailor, I am a rube! However, a basic sewing machine with a decent straight stitch, a seam ripper, good scissors and a chalk pencil (and the aforementioned Stitch Witchery) allows me to take in jackets, remove center vents, and alter pant waists. I can do hand sewing for cuffs and inseams. Because my entire tailored wardrobe is thrifted, if a garment requires more tailoring than I can master, I practice on it or get rid of it. Did I mention that I enjoy tailoring my clothes?

Many times we intimidate ourselves into never attempting to master a new skill. Sewing is a craft that has a learning curve, but so does anything that is a worthwhile accomplishment.

I like a ventless jacket purely as an aesthetic preference, I think they are more flattering for my body type than a center-vented jacket. Here is another thrifted jacket (linen, Hart Schaffner & Marx Gold Trumpeter) that I altered by removing the center vent and slimming the jacket:

Outerwear Dress shirt Neck Sleeve Gesture
 

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I do hope the original poster and anyone else who wants to try learning basic tailoring do so. It is not as difficult or esoteric as some may claim. When I was a child it was taught at the Junior High School level as part of Home Economics. Every home had a sewing machine.

Basic alterations can be learned fairly quickly. It is quite satisfying to have control over how each item of clothing you own will fit.
 

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What a great thread! Not sure how missed it before.

I too teaching myself to do alteration tailoring....

Hope this helps.
Thanks for a very insightful and inspiring post. I also do a basting stitch by hand for all of my alterations to insure proper fit. This gives me an accurate guide for the final stitching by machine. I found that I could not do accurate final stitches with pins as guides as is often shown in youtube 'how to sew' videos (very frustrating way to sew). I create a temporary baste stitch in a contrasting color and use it as a guide for my final stitches, removing it after I've done the final stitching.

I use an inexpensive Brother sewing machine (made in Japan) and I would not attempt to do heavy denim with it. However, it is perfect for any fabric used for tailored suits, sportcoats and slacks. The basic straight stitch is sufficient for 95% of the alterations I do.

I will need to practice a slip stitch by hand so that I can quickly close up the lining properly rather than 'cheating' by using Stitch Witchery stitch tape. Your post has inspired me to invest a bit more time in practicing proper hand stitching. Thanks for a great post!
 
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