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My heavy tweed sport coats don't crease easily and usually are wrinkle free by the time I come back to each one through the rotation.

With lighter fabrics, some with linen or silk blends, how does one get the wrinkles out? I used to wear jackets infrequently so would dry clean them after one wear but that would be to severe. Do steamers work and which ones would you recommend?
 

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Serious tailors do not recommend steaming jackets, ymmv.

I'm hoping your linen jackets are minimally lined, in which it's probably all right to handwash in cold, then iron. Lightweight linens crease and get messy looking; that's just part of the aesthetic. Heavier linen (11oz +) crease less and crumple more.
 

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I'm no tailor either but I'm having a hard time seeing how a properly sewn seam can be compromised by steam.
Temperature!! The temperature of hot steam could burn or break the thread on the seam that causes puckering.

According to the Iron's manual, Linen is pretty hard to withstand Iron so that you can use highest temperature on it. However, depends on the materials of the thread, the thread itself can be broken by steam or iron if temperature is high enough.

That is the reason that one shall never steam press seam with too high the temperature.
 

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Temperature!! The temperature of hot steam could burn or break the thread on the seam that causes puckering.

According to the Iron's manual, Linen is pretty hard to withstand Iron so that you can use highest temperature on it. However, depends on the materials of the thread, the thread itself can be broken by steam or iron if temperature is high enough.

That is the reason that one shall never steam press seam with too high the temperature.
Would a hand steamer produce the same results though? Or just passive steam as from the shower.

I get it with a commercial steam press given the temperature and the mechanical agitation.
 

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Would a hand steamer produce the same results though? Or just passive steam as from the shower.

I get it with a commercial steam press given the temperature and the mechanical agitation.
This is quoted in the attached link in the middle of the first paragraph.

...
NEVER use a steamer on a suit, and never hang your suit in a steamy bathroom. A steamer will undo all the shaping that was created when the suit was made, and steaming a suit can also make problems appear such as puckering and blown seams, breaking sleeves etc.
https://www.styleforum.net/threads/guide-to-touching-up-your-suit-without-wrecking-it.88504/

Personally I don't have handheld steamer so I do not know its capability. However, with a home use iron, it is fairly easy to steam or shine a wool clothes, if not careful, with high temperature. Silk and polyester thread may not withstand the high temperature too long. Cotton thread should be stronger, but given time it could still break.
 

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I’ve never actually steamed a tailored garment. Usually whatever wrinkles are present just fall out when hung.

I have, however, steamed a few unlined and unstructured linen and cotton jackets and never had an issue.
 

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Embrace the wrinkles! If the jacket is very nice, i.e. for important business meetings, keep it hung until the meeting, then take it off right after. Otherwise, learn to love the wrinkles.
 

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I've "tactically" steamed my suits with a hand steamer for years. By that I mean, if a sleeve or the back skirt is aggressively wrinkled but the rest of the suit is in good shape, I'll steam just that area and I'll do that, ideally from the back side and at a touch of a distance (I don't run the steamer hard against the front facing material). Also, I never steam the canvassed areas as those rarely wrinkle and, if they do, it's time for a professional pressing.

It's a way, IMHO, to both reduce the wear and tear of dry cleaning / pressing on the jacket as many times all it needs is a tactical sprucing up (same with the trousers) and to save some money (I'm in my third decade of steaming and only on my second hand steamer - and that's only because I dropped my first one on the hard bathroom floor - plastic doesn't like falling onto tile from about five feet up).
 

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I use a steamer on something I feel needs a once over to relax some of the wrinkles. Mine is a hand held Rowenta. Quick and easy to use, and effective within it's limitation. Gets steam almost instantly and shoots it into the cloth. But it has a tiny reservoir and runs out of water after a few minutes of operation.

It's essential for some areas like sleeve heads, but flat panels, like the front and back, can also quickly be touched up with a steam iron, and that is more effective if you're not in a hurry.

But bottom line, a few wrinkles are no big deal. Looking as if one has been on a park bench for a few weeks is.
 
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