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I won't bore you with equestrian lore, but hack is from an old french word refering to horses rented for riding. So think rental cars and clothing reflecting needs while traveling.
They will 'hack it' for everything a sports coat 'sports' in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I won't bore you with equestrian lore, but hack is from an old french word refering to horses rented for riding. So think rental cars and clothing reflecting needs while traveling.
They will 'hack it' for everything a sports coat 'sports' in.
Thanks. I wonder if that's where a hackney license for taxicabs comes from.

What's the relationship between a hacking jacket and a shooting jacket?
 

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If I am correct, and I am not an expert by any stretch, a Hacking jacket was designed with slanted pockets so the person wearing it could access the pockets easier while on horseback to load his shotgun with the shells stored in the pockets of the jacket.

A shooting jacket has pockets with more of a patch flap style that have extra material in order to store shells.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If I am correct, and I am not an expert by any stretch, a Hacking jacket was designed with slanted pockets so the person wearing it could access the pockets easier while on horseback to load his shotgun with the shells stored in the pockets of the jacket.

A shooting jacket has pockets with more of a patch flap style that have extra material in order to store shells.
I think I read that somewhere here as well.

I know that deer hunting on horseback (as opposed to stalking) was outlawed in England in 2005 I think, but is still allowed in Ireland. Is there any other kind of hunting/stalking still permitted on horseback? If not, it will be interesting to see if the fashion survives its purpose.
 

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Yes, the term hackney cab is a british carriage term that carried over, like many carriage terms to automobiles.
A shooting jacket is traditionaly for upland hunting with shotguns. The bi swing back, special construction for the arms all facilitate sweeping lead shots. The bellows pockets are for field supplies and the cut is roomy for movement vs tight for riding.
You can see both @ Booksters.
 

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The shooting isn't done horseback, but after dismounting, deer viewing horses as non predatory animals.
Any horse that tolerates any fiream discharged from it's back is two things; well trained and often deaf.
 

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You like flannel hacking jackets? Really?
Will

I was referring to Saxony tweed fabrics that are woven by the likes of Reid & Taylor, Johnstons and Teviotex (all in Scotland). They are usually around 17/18oz in weight and have a softer handle than, say, a cheviot or crossbred tweed.
If you are interested in learning about cloths and their properties I can suggest an excellent blog that will keep you informed of great little bits of information just like this...oh hang on, you write it.:icon_smile:

W_B
 

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I agree with other posters that it is an interesting alternative to a more conventional odd jacket. Don't think I'd care for a wardrobe composed just of these, as I think it's more stylized appearance could wear thin with excessive exposure.

Bookster makes this style almost exclusively, and does them in fabulous tweeds.
 

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Bookster also makes hunting jackets, and you can tweak the style with horizontal pockets.
If you DO want to get fatiqued with hacking togs, go to a Tennessee walking horse ( Bookster's logo) or Saddlebred park horse class.
The riders wear nice ones, but the pants are deliberately overlong to drape over the foot.
Go into the stables and all these people with rolled up pants walk around like ducks.
 

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Ede and Ravenscroft puts hacking pockets ....

on their suits as well as Paul Stuart. I think it is a nice look. I wouldn't wear one for business, but I see nothing wrong with having hacking pocets on a suit or sport coat. If I could afford Paul Stuart, I'd get a suit with hacking pockets.
 

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on their suits as well as Paul Stuart. I think it is a nice look. I wouldn't wear one for business, but I see nothing wrong with having hacking pocets on a suit or sport coat. If I could afford Paul Stuart, I'd get a suit with hacking pockets.
They are almost default on London suits at the moment. However, slanting pockets alone do not make a hacking jacket.
For me, a classic hacking jacket has the following features;
  • longer body
  • higher waist
  • waisted and skirted
  • deep centre vent (12" not unusual)
  • sb3 notch lapel
  • high buttoning
  • shallow scye
  • Tapered sleeves
  • Sleeves set forward
  • Slanting pockets and outside ticket pocket.
W_B
 

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W-B: I appreciate your viewpoint, but you are looking at a hacking jacket ....

from an entirely different perspective than I am. I liked the Ede & Ravenscroft suits with hacking pockets as well as a ticket pocket and side vents. I've never been on a horse in my life and I don't intend to in the future. I like the style of Ede and Ravenscroft and Paul Stuart and that'a all I'm interested in, not conformance to some features I could care less about. To each his own.
 
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