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For some reason, over the past couple of months or so, I've gotten really into fried chicken...now, I've had a long standing love affair with wings, but recently, I've gotten into all the other parts of the chicken, breaded up and fried golden brown, even the leg and thigh which I refuse to eat baked or BBQ'd I have no problem with scarfing down when it's fried...any-who...I usually order it out (no, not KFC...although I can manage with some KFC or Popeyes if nothing else is available)...but seeing as how I enjoy getting behind the stove, I'd like to try my hand at frying up some chicken...anybody have any good seasoning recipies or frying methods they'd like to recommend to me???
 

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For some reason, over the past couple of months or so, I've gotten really into fried chicken...now, I've had a long standing love affair with wings, but recently, I've gotten into all the other parts of the chicken, breaded up and fried golden brown, even the leg and thigh which I refuse to eat baked or BBQ'd I have no problem with scarfing down when it's fried...any-who...I usually order it out (no, not KFC...although I can manage with some KFC or Popeyes if nothing else is available)...but seeing as how I enjoy getting behind the stove, I'd like to try my hand at frying up some chicken...anybody have any good seasoning recipies or frying methods they'd like to recommend to me???
Young man, if you're just now getting interested in fried chicken you need to spend much more time in the south. We could really broaden your horizons. :aportnoy: Arteries be damned.
 

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Fried chicken is a beautiful thing. Once you master it yourself, you will better appreciate what you can get carry out from the competent place. I would suggest that you work first with smaller pieces and dark meat.
 

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I cook my own fried chicken often. It's one of my favorite foods, always has been.

There's enough frying methods out there to fill a library, but the one I use is fairly simple.

First you soak your chicken pieces in a bowl of water with a little bit of salt, baking soda and sugar. The amount varies depending on how much chicken you're making, but is at least a half-teaspoon of each. (The salt draws out some of the excess blood, the baking powder tenderizes the meat a bit, and the sugar sweetens it somewhat. You can leave out the last two if desired, but the salt is essential.) Soak for at least 30 minutes.

Pat dry your chicken and dredge it in seasoned flour. (I use a local variety (Big Spring Mill of Elliston, Va.) but is much more widely available and will create the desired flavor. Alternatively, you can make your own seasoned flour, but it's a bit trickier. It's not something you can do correctly the first time unless you're really good with flavoring.)

Let your chicken rest for at least 20 minutes while you heat your oil. It can rest either at room temperature or in the fridge. After about 10 minutes, you can put a second coat of flour on to produce a thicker, crispier crust, but it's personal preference on this.

A word on oils: I use Crisco or Wesson, but just about any kind of oil will fry chicken. I don't tend to use olive oil, coconut oil or peanut oil because they have low smoke points, but any conventional oil is fair game.

Make sure you have a pot of sufficient depth so that the chicken will be completely immersed in oil without splattering. (Some people prefer shallow frying, but I use deep frying, preferably in a heavy-bottomed pot with at least a couple of inches of oil inside. You can use a deep fryer instead, but make sure it has a temperature control. Fry Daddies (which have no temperature control) don't work well with chicken.)

Heat your oil to 350 degrees (use a candy thermometer to gauge the heat) and immerse your chicken into the hot oil. Breasts with bones and thighs tend to take longer to cook, so put them in first. Do not crowd your pan with chicken. Give each piece space to fry.

Turn your chicken at last once while frying. Wait about 5 minutes before you do.

Mostr chicken will fry to perfection in 10 to 20 minutes. It's done when clear juices run from the pieces. drain on absorbant paper or a rack and let it sit for at least 3-4 minutes.

That's pretty much it.
 

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Steven, that sounds great!

My mother uses a half fry/ half bake method with great results. She uses a procedure close to Steven's (although she uses seasoned bread crumbs.)

She leaves the chicken in the oil long enough to brown, and then transfers it to the oven to complete the cooking process.

Both ways can produce excellent chicken. (Although, I admit I'm partial to my mother's method.)

I seldom try to fry chicken myself because about half the time I get it right and half the time, I engage in slapstick comedy.
 

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Steven, that sounds great!

My mother uses a half fry/ half bake method with great results. She uses a procedure close to Steven's (although she uses seasoned bread crumbs.)

She leaves the chicken in the oil long enough to brown, and then transfers it to the oven to complete the cooking process.

Both ways can produce excellent chicken. (Although, I admit I'm partial to my mother's method.)

I seldom try to fry chicken myself because about half the time I get it right and half the time, I engage in slapstick comedy.
Thanks for the kudos. I've tried a method similar to your mom's, but typically i ony use the oven to keep the chicken warm if I'm fixing multiple batches.

Bel;ieve you me. I occasionally screw up on my chicken. rushing things will make go chicken go bad in a hurry.
 

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If you are in the Dallas area, go to Babe's on 35E and beltline in downtown carrollton. They serve it up family style with unlimited cream corn, mash potatoes, cream gravy, green beans, salad, and biscuits.

The original Babe's in Roanoke, TX is the easiest place in the world to order. You can only choose two menu items off the "menu". Fried Chicken or Chicken Fried Steak.

Another recommendation (if it still exists post-Katrina) is Dunbar's on Freret in New Orleans, just east of Tulane university. Wednesday's were (are?) all you can eat Fried Chicken and red beans and rice. Excellent!
 

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Here's Alton's recipe:

https://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_15279,00.html?rsrc=search

I have no firsthand experience with it, however, an acquaintance has tried it and recommends it enthusiastically.

In Michigan, the big name in fried chicken is Frankemouth, a bavarian town near Flint that has two competing chicken houses across the street from each other, Zehnder's and Bavarian Inn. Both are massive edifices with multiple, German themed dining rooms. Both offer a fairly decent fried chicken experience, including noodles and gravy and, at Bavarian Inn, a superlative Orange/Cranberry sauce.

A bit further north, placed squarely in the middle of nowhere, is the Damsite Inn, purveyor of absolutely fantastic lightly fried chicken, incredible egg noodles and mashed potatoes, fresh peas and hot biscuits. The swanky, authentic 60's art-deco revival decor and beautiful lakeside setting add to the experience. Highly recommended if you are in the northern lower peninsula area.
 

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Here's Alton's recipe:

https://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_15279,00.html?rsrc=search

I have no firsthand experience with it, however, an acquaintance has tried it and recommends it enthusiastically.

In Michigan, the big name in fried chicken is Frankemouth, a bavarian town near Flint that has two competing chicken houses across the street from each other, Zehnder's and Bavarian Inn. Both are massive edifices with multiple, German themed dining rooms. Both offer a fairly decent fried chicken experience, including noodles and gravy and, at Bavarian Inn, a superlative Orange/Cranberry sauce.

A bit further north, placed squarely in the middle of nowhere, is the Damsite Inn, purveyor of absolutely fantastic lightly fried chicken, incredible egg noodles and mashed potatoes, fresh peas and hot biscuits. The swanky, authentic 60's art-deco revival decor and beautiful lakeside setting add to the experience. Highly recommended if you are in the northern lower peninsula area.
I've been to Zehnder's, and they do have great chicken.
The best place for fried chicken in St. Louis is Hodak's in South City.
 

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Tony's Creole Seasoning makes a fine seasoning for the chicken. I preferred the deep fry in the stockpot method, but have had incredible cast iron skillet birds as well. Chicken fried steak or chicken breast has to be done in cast iron.
 

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Wow. I grew up in Frankenmuth.

I agree about the chicken. (They boil theirs and then fry it enough to get the coating to stick.)

The restaurants are now owned by the second generation, but the two founders were actually brothers (Zehnder is the surname.) The Bavarian Inn and Zehnders both were hotels about 70 years ago, but the chicken business was a big draw, so they started doing that.
 

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Wow. I grew up in Frankenmuth.

I agree about the chicken. (They boil theirs and then fry it enough to get the coating to stick.)

The restaurants are now owned by the second generation, but the two founders were actually brothers (Zehnder is the surname.) The Bavarian Inn and Zehnders both were hotels about 70 years ago, but the chicken business was a big draw, so they started doing that.
Trying to decide if it's worth a quick drive up there when I'm in Windsor. Hmmm, long drive for chicken and an Xmas ornament. Nah, better take the train up to Toronto :)
 

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Once you are through the tunnel, it should only be about 90 minutes. Unless you run into road construction, it would be two hours at the worst.
 

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Trying to decide if it's worth a quick drive up there when I'm in Windsor. Hmmm, long drive for chicken and an Xmas ornament. Nah, better take the train up to Toronto :)
There's also the Birch Run outlet complex, with really nice Brooks Brothers, Orvis and Smith & Hawken stores, as well as the regular Polo/RL/Waterford/Crueset/etc...

On the way back, Great Lakes Crossing with Nieman Marcus Last Call, Saks Off Fifth, another BB outlet, etc... The Last Call has a great selection of ties, and just started carrying T&A shirts. Last time I was there they had a great summer weight Oxxford houndstooth jacket for $200. Not my size, alas.

Get off once more at Rochester Road in Troy, and there's a Nordstrom Rack and a Syms that usually carries a nice selection of ties and RLPL.
 
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