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From the title, it sounds like this is some sort of doctoral dissertation, but really it's just a few questions to ponder.

When I read Flusser's book it made lots of sense: Low and high contrast complexions and involving garment color(s) to add another level of distinction to one's appearance. The idea being that the tie or shirt shoud not call attention to itself, but rather, re-focus the eye on what happens above the shirt.

What remains unresolved for me is.. how does this 'square' with the notion that everyone looks better in formal wear, which is extremely high contrast black and white?

And if one accepts Flusser's argument, and buys shirts and ties that works well together as well as support one's complexion, is there suit colors that are 'wrong' for certain people?

Does a navy suit focus attention on a light colored blonde and fair complected person's hair and face...or would they be better seen in a lighter shade? Back in the days when technicolor movies were so prominent and studios had wardrobe experts, I can recall seeing light colored, low contrast complexions (such as Danny Kaye) in blue suits that were almost robin's egg blue!

Perhaps that was a fashion in the 50's, but today, who ever sees a really light colored blue, (or taupe for that matter) suit? Thoughts anyone?
 

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From the title, it sounds like this is some sort of doctoral dissertation, but really it's just a few questions to ponder.

When I read Flusser's book it made lots of sense: Low and high contrast complexions and involving garment color(s) to add another level of distinction to one's appearance. The idea being that the tie or shirt shoud not call attention to itself, but rather, re-focus the eye on what happens above the shirt.

What remains unresolved for me is.. how does this 'square' with the notion that everyone looks better in formal wear, which is extremely high contrast black and white?

And if one accepts Flusser's argument, and buys shirts and ties that works well together as well as support one's complexion, is there suit colors that are 'wrong' for certain people?

Does a navy suit focus attention on a light colored blonde and fair complected person's hair and face...or would they be better seen in a lighter shade? Back in the days when technicolor movies were so prominent and studios had wardrobe experts, I can recall seeing light colored, low contrast complexions (such as Danny Kaye) in blue suits that were almost robin's egg blue!

Perhaps that was a fashion in the 50's, but today, who ever sees a really light colored blue, (or taupe for that matter) suit? Thoughts anyone?
I have trouble with black, tans, and lighter gray suits.

Thusly, I perfer blue shirts and have chosen formalwear that hints at a blue-ish black. I chose dark suits frequently but do try to ensure that I am not "washed" out in my complexion by my attire. The wife says I have "winter coloring"- whatever that means.
 

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Flusser's theories on colour along with all other colour wheels etc are grossly overrated. They should, at best, be taken as an extremely rough guide.

I think all complexions can wear all 'basic' colours (by this I mean black, white, browns, greys, greens, yellows, reds, blues, pinks, purples). Some wear certain colours somewhat better than others. Some colours only necessitate that the wearer be more careful in choosing a more favourable hue of that colour, or that the wearer pay more attention to cut and fit.

Next, the quality of the cloth matters. Really quality cloths are dyed using quality dyes, which are subtle and rich. I could almost choose cloths at random from the Acorn, Alumo or H Lesser books and end up with a wearable garment 95% of the time.

The only real use for colour theories is when you are choosing cheaper RTW garments, when it helps to make them look less awful.
 

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What remains unresolved for me is.. how does this 'square' with the notion that everyone looks better in formal wear, which is extremely high contrast black and white?
I do admit, however, that in evening light the strength of the contrast is softened. Those whom black-white flatters less, need only concentrate more on fit and cut. As I say, everyone can find a way to successfully wear all colours.
 

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I have trouble with black, tans, and lighter gray suits.

Thusly, I perfer blue shirts and have chosen formalwear that hints at a blue-ish black. I chose dark suits frequently but do try to ensure that I am not "washed" out in my complexion by my attire. The wife says I have "winter coloring"- whatever that means.
Not the best link but it will do. https://www.beauty-and-the-bath.com/Season-Color-Analysis.html

If you're really a winter primary colors including black should look great on you.
 

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I would say that there are certain colors that I am not confident wearing because of red undertones. I find too much red, like a red shirt, makes me look nervous, overheated, or like I have really bad skin. I usually find a way to work with warm colors, but I have to be aware of what looks good on me.
 
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