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If virtually any fabric (cotton, silk, wool, etc.) can be made a certain weight (heavy, light), and be made to feel just like any other fabric (again, cotton, silk, wool, etc.), what is the point of having a variety of fabrics that make up one's wardrobe? Is it tradition?

I mean, people complain about how silk isn't breathable (which I disagree), so if one were to have a suit in heavy silk made, couldn't he wear it for the fall/winter, instead of medium wool or flannel?
 

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Sure.

You could probably make anything be like anything else in some superficial way. Most fabrics are made for mass market in the case of our clothes. We can't all go around supporting unique choices in fabrics to be made just because we want a cotton suit that looks and feels like gold lame, or whatever you like.

So we are stuck in what is available, and I am not ready to trust a cotton suit in the biting cold, or a thick wool on the beach, etc. Most clothes and their clothes function at certain times for certain reasons.

The wool tends to be rather manageable, where cotton would wrinkle. There is safety in the event of a fire where plastics would melt to you and the thicker wools would probably protect you instead of igniting instantly, etc.
 

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If virtually any fabric (cotton, silk, wool, etc.) can be made a certain weight (heavy, light), and be made to feel just like any other fabric (again, cotton, silk, wool, etc.), what is the point of having a variety of fabrics that make up one's wardrobe? Is it tradition?
Simple. Most fabrics can be made in different weights but cannot be made to feel, look or, most important, behave, like other fabrics.
 

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Never thought (shudder) of that!

The wool tends to be rather manageable, where cotton would wrinkle. There is safety in the event of a fire where plastics would melt to you and the thicker wools would probably protect you instead of igniting instantly, etc.
I must admit that it had never crossed my mind how my clothes might behave in a blaze. I suppose I just always assumed that, if the flames were close enough, or the heat high enough, to ignite them that I would already have succumbed to smoke inhalation or having my brain fatally cooked:icon_smile_wink:

Of course, there are fire safety standards for infants' clothing, so why not for adults as well? After 911 all our conceits about safety are in a cocked hat. Perhaps that could be a campaign for the site and the members of AAAC.
 

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I"m with Will here, You can make most materials into yarns of different thicknesses and weave them differently into fabrics of different weights, but they will not behave like each other. Wool will handle differently from silk from cotton from polyester, and each will behave differently by weight and weave. There are specific uses and places for each fabric that make wearing suiting even more comfortable and enjoyable.
 
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