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I've seen several pictures of the new Attorney General, and it seems that he hasn't bought a suit in about a decade. Did we really wear suits with notch lapels that were this low?

From 2008:

From 2006:

https://photos.upi.com/topics-Eric_Holder/5f07bfe1caabd1457eadae4069d6a60d/Eric_Holder_2.jpg

From 2001:

https://photos.upi.com/topics-Eric_Holder/e58d0e1f7533e28bd23a6074b72d68eb/Eric_Holder_10.jpg

I don't know much about Mr. Holder, other than that he was somehow involved in the pardon of Mark Rich on Clinton's last day in office, but I figured it would be safer to put this in the Interchange to start out with...
 

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^^Indeed, Mike61's judgement is as good as his sartorial eye...this could be an interesting thread. As observed in the OP, Mr Holders' fashion sense is perhaps as dated as his politics and his sense of social justice? Oh-oh...Incoming!! :eek:
 

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^^Indeed, Mike61's judgement is as good as his sartorial eye...this could be an interesting thread. As observed in the OP, Mr Holders' fashion sense is perhaps as dated as his politics and his sense of social justice? Oh-oh...Incoming!! :eek:
No, we just tried eight years of rejecting any sense of social justice and it turned out not to work out so well.
 

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No, we just tried eight years of rejecting any sense of social justice and it turned out not to work out so well.
Many people don't think that social justice is a government function. I can't find it mentioned anywhere in the constitution, unless its in one of them essences of a penumbra. I'd suggest reading Atlas Shrugged, but I think we're starting to live it.
 

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Many people don't think that social justice is a government function.
Some people don't think that regular-old-plain-Jane-vanilla justice is a government function.

What exactly is "social" justice, anyway? Justice is inherently social. And the term justice already includes the universality of moral principle. That's a social as it gets.

Using the qualifier social is therefore unnecessary, and considering how I have seen it used, is typically just another euphemism for increased state control.
 

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Some people don't think that regular-old-plain-Jane-vanilla justice is a government function.

What exactly is "social" justice, anyway? Justice is inherently social. And the term justice already includes the universality of moral principle. That's a social as it gets.

Using the qualifier social is therefore unnecessary, and considering how I have seen it used, is typically just another euphemism for increased state control.
How do I know your universality of moral principle is the same as my universality of moral principle and why should government favor one of ours over the other? :icon_smile_wink:

When we speak of plain jane vanilla justice we're usually talking about justice under the law, that is that the nation's laws should be applied consistently and with out regard to the defendant's or victim's identity. I think we can all agree that is a desirable objective. My professor in business law stressed that the law is different from morality, a lawyer's and judge's job is to apply the law, not to necessarily try to achieve a moral outcome.

When you start talking about having the government define and enforce someone's version of morality or social justice you're talking about a system where some citizens force others to live by their beliefs, the tyranny of the majority if you will. That's not to say that that isn't a function of many governments, its just that the United States was established to avoid exactly that outcome. Many of the early settlers, such as the pilgrims, came to the colonies fleeing exactly that sort of system. Social justice is not to be found as a function of government in the Constitution, the document meant to limit governments reach into our lives.

Our system was originally meant to guarantee equal opportunity, not equal results.
 

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Some people don't think that regular-old-plain-Jane-vanilla justice is a government function.

What exactly is "social" justice, anyway? Justice is inherently social. And the term justice already includes the universality of moral principle. That's a social as it gets.

Using the qualifier social is therefore unnecessary, and considering how I have seen it used, is typically just another euphemism for increased state control.
Justice means that I have the right to be paid back the money I lent, and government will enforce such a right. Mercy means that I voluntarily exercise forebearance in enforcing my right to be repaid back out of sympathy for the borrower. Charity means that I if I do get paid back I voluntarily give away some or all of the proceeds to those who are in need. Social justice is the conversion of mercy and charity into involuntary acts via government force. It is often favored by those who are uncomfortable with the concepts of mercy and charity as belittling or some such thing. The acceptance of mercy or charity can impair self-esteem and that is something many social justice advocates cannot abide.
 
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