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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After taking a non-fused suit to be dry cleaned at a supposedly reputable cleaner (they charged $20 to clean the suit), there is some tiny puckering in the quarters of the jacket, a couple inches under the pocket flaps. The suit had never been dry cleaned before and the puckering problem doesn't really seem to be occurring elsewhere on the jacket.

The person who sold me the suit is very reputable and tells me they have never heard of this problem before in six years of selling this line of suits, so the problem is attributable to the cleaners. The seller thinks they either cleaned or pressed the suit on too high of heat, causing "warping" in the fabric. I should also mention the suit is made of a fairly delicate high thread count wool, which I informed the cleaners of when I dropped off the suit.

I am going to call the cleaners today and see what they have to say about my problem.

My hunch is they are going to try to avoid responsibility, since the clerk tried to tell me it was the suit's fault that they pressed a 8 inch vertical crease into an area of the suit where there wasn't even a seam underneath. I did not notice the puckering on pick up...I didn't notice it until the next morning before putting on the suit for an interview.

Has anyone experienced a problem like this before? Any thoughts on it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Update from the cleaners:

I called them and they told me to bring the suit in and they would have a look. I asked what could be done to fix it and they said they could repress the suit with sizing (I assume that means starch, which I hate). That doesn't sound right to me...any thoughts? I don't want to mess up the suit any further because I will need to wear it next week for on campus interviews at my law school.
 

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dry cleaning

truth is cleaners do not press jackets. they press trousers only.
the jacket is placed on a canvas dummy and buttoned up. spring loaded forms are placed in the sleeves. then steam inflates the canvas and then turned off. then cold dry air is pumped in to dry the jacket.
they call it pressing because as this process is done, a small form comes down and presses the collar and the top of the shoulders. the rest of the jacket is just steamed.

every one should ask your cleaners for a tour of the cleaning plant.
this should a part of your sartorial education.
 
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