Men's Clothing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,460 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A previous thread mentioned spray sizing (as opposed to the dreaded spray starch). I found it at Wal-mart next to a couple of products that advertised themselves as a home dry cleaning process in which the garment is placed in some sort of chemically treated bag and shoved in the dryer.

It sounds dubious to me but I wondered if any bold soul here had experimented with this.

(BTW, the sizing is much better than starch.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Tried the do-it-yourself at home dry cleaning once... About all it does is mask odors and then that's very temporary. You're better off just going to the dry cleaner and avoiding the hassle.

In my case the stuff caused a spot on the suit that the dry cleaner had a nightmare getting out. It came out but he had to work at it.

I believe it was the Dryel stuff. It just wasn't worth what I paid for basically nothing.

- Denver
 

·
Site Creator
Joined
·
13,166 Posts
Sizing was developed for synthetics and fabric blends. It restores the original body of fabrics without stiffness and can be used on natural fibers for a light finish. Regular starch gives more body than sizing and is designed to be used on natural fabrics.

I've tried the home dry cleaning kit on a couple of sweaters and they came out fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,998 Posts
I've used it for a few wool sweaters and a few silk blouses my wife wanted freshened up.

If you need something actually cleaned, then take it to the cleaners. But for freshening, it's fine.

I've never used it for tailored clothing and don't think I would.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top