Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 20 of 83 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is probably a well-worn subject by now, but I'd be most interested in hearing the ways in which men dress well in this age of casual rule.

I would happily dress as our esteemed member Upr_Crust does each day! Sadly, a button-down shirt, khakis, and a blazer now elicits comments such as, "Why so dressed up?" Dressed up? My late father would never be caught in public in anything less!

I got to thinking about this topic (yet again), after reviewing an interview with Roycru. As part of this, he said:
" It seems as if, for the first time in history, there is a universal world wide style for all sexes and ages consisting of tennis shoes, jeans (or short pants), back packs, ball caps (worn indoors and outdoors), and tee shirts, which almost all people wear wherever they go and whatever they do. Any other style seems to be a relic of a time that has gone and will never come back." (italics my own)

The interview concluded with:
"Finally, what can readers learn from traditional American dress?

RP: Probably the same things that they can learn from looking at dinosaur bones, seeing what's left of a time that has passed forever. When I was young, everyone looked like me. Now, very few people still look like me. Eventually, probably no one will look like me. Some time in the future traditional American prep-ivy-trad style will be as rare as knee breeches, tricorn hats, and powdered hair are now."

So I ask anyone interested in commenting, how do you dress these days, and not look as a relic?

Or do you just say (as I often do) that if people can put steel in their faces, and wear pajamas in public, how can anything that is classic style (or anything else these days for that matter) be considered weird?
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
2,318 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,593 Posts
Being in clinical medicine, a suit is the least appropriate form of dress. I does not instill confidence, and has an entrepreneurial association amongst patients. So I wear them only for social occasions that are dressy affairs short of Black Tie, and business functions. Otherwise alas, they get no use.

Luckily for me, I get to wear sports coats and odd trousers everyday to work, even if the coat is replaced by a white lab coat when seeing patients. I still get to enjoy them driving in to work, going home and running errands as well as at lunch.

For leisure time activities I doff the tie, and try to wear a sports coat as often as possible, if weather permits a sweater. Except for hot days or exceptionally balmy nights its a nice Polo shirt. Especially in winter tweed can be usd in place of a jacket on milder days, and cords and moleskins make their debut. In the summer lightweight jackets, and blazers, pair well with chinos, linens, cotton trousers, and cav twills. I do not think they are going away, just less people are making the effort to dress well. I seem to always get appreciative comments, mostly from women whose partners could use a good improvement in their sartorial endeavors. Living near NYC, I find much more opportunity to be fitting in with the dress of the natives when dining out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,022 Posts
This is probably a well-worn subject by now, but I'd be most interested in hearing the ways in which men dress well in this age of casual rule.

I would happily dress as our esteemed member Upr_Crust does each day! /QUOTE]

Trust me, it's a heavy burden of responsibility dressing well, so that hordes of under-dressed people can think me weird. :)

As it is, I am recognizing the true extent of my own eccentricity, but, for me, it just feels normal. Happily, my work environment allows me great latitude in how I attire myself, such that I can wear pretty much whatever I want, and only be thought to be "that harmless old eccentric in the corner", without fear of greater castigation
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,775 Posts
Seems like the imminent demise of menswear has been predicted before, yet somehow there persists, like the Resistance in Star Wars: The Last Jedi, a few stalwarts that keep the spark alive. I'm typically an optimist, and with the ever-growing influence of social media, including sites like the Forum, there seems to me a healthy environment for folks of a similar ilk (don't wear baseball caps 24/7; occasionally tuck in a shirt; can still tie a tie, etc...) to share ideas and opinions. Besides, I have long since stopped 'dressing for others'. They usually are indifferent to the particulars of sartorial significance, and really, why would I want their input if that's the case. Do I get strange or judgemental looks? Actually, if anything, the odd compliment here and there, which is fine and occasionally flattering. I'm not quite in the "clothes make the man" category, but I simply enjoy thinking about and wearing nicer clothes. Hey, it's cheaper than a stable of cars I can't drive to their fullest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
So I ask anyone interested in commenting, how do you dress these days, and not look as a relic?
Can you look good and look like a relic at the same? Well, of course--they're not mutually exclusive.

People and I agree that I look good in a suit/sport coat; we disagree whether it's outdated. I can live with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
In my field of aerospace structure assembly, dressing well is impossible. My work clothing gets destroyed in a couple months of use. It consists of jeans, boots and work issued polo/t-shirts. My free time on the weekend is when I can wear nice clothing.

My social circle has no interest in dressing appropriately outside of perhaps church so I am a bit limited in that regard. I wore a flatcap one night when we arrived for a group dinner and was asked if I just got home from playing a round of golf.. wearing a sportcoat around them is out of the question. Casual dressup for me is a nice pair of wool trousers, dress shoes and typically a buttondown with a sweater-vest or a heavy cable-knit or v-neck.

Unfortunately my only opportunities to wear a suit or sportcoat are either at church and evenings out. In a way it’s sort of sad because Charleston used to be a fairly well dressed city but, with the tourism boom in the last 10-15 years you can well imagine the current dressing style. Restaurants that required at a minimum- sportcoat, have all but vanished. Requirements are now “prefered” dress codes, end result is typically jeans, sneakers and a polo. My fiancé and I went to a very nice establishment downtown last year called the Penninsula Grill, dressed as stated, suit & ladies dress, even the hostess asked why we were all dressed up..

I will continue to dress as “old Charleston” because it makes me feel good, even if it continues to bring the snide comments. Maybe it will wear off on them..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,460 Posts
My typical daily wardrobe consists of brown brogues, solid color socks, khakis, a leather belt, a BB dress shirt, a waist coat, a jacket and an occasional tie. My wardrobe is mostly mundane with some sartorial flashes, nothing special. The waistcoat is what gets the most attention.

I am known at my work as one of the better dressed men. I find this a sad commentary on how standards have collapsed.

A few things that work for me that place me at the pinnacle of the work dress pyramid: My clothes fit, they are well made, they create a unified look, they are clean and pressed.

I spend about $1500 per year on clothes with shoes taking the biggest bite of the budget. This year, I went a bit over the average since I had to buy an entire white tie ensemble.

Cheers,

BSR
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,969 Posts
Think that if you find coats that fit your personality people will feel more comfortable around you. Not all sports coats fit your personality, which goes for other garments, too.

A lack of color coordination with some styles of clothes can really make a person stand out in an unfavorable way.
 

·
Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Joined
·
37,088 Posts
Hey, what do you expect? I am a retiree. I relocated to central Florida and purchased a home in a development that is ensconced in a golf course and what is effectively a nature preserve, with several beautiful nature trails that are just begging to be explored. Leisure rules and the clothing I kept (after the move) and wear regularly reflects that reality. My daily uniform consists of chinos, vented fishing shirts, with the sleeves rolled to the elbow (I think the count is up to 17 at this point), and boat shoes or penny loafers. Suits and sport coats are reserved for Sunday services and even then, I am part of a very small minority that is wearing anything more than the casual wear that I described as my Monday through Saturday uniform(s) or, even worse, shorts and printed T-shirts:oops:! Five suits and perhaps 9 sport coats remain in my closet, mostly unworn. I fear that inventory of more dressy garments will continue to shrink as time passes. Egad...I think I may be going native! :eek: LOL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,971 Posts
There will always be people who appreciate fine clothing. For most this is a luxury that has no practical purpose. Temperature controlled buildings and transportation has eliminated the practical need for much of our clothing and global warming as well as migration to warmer climates has furthered this trend. I think you will see a continued loss of brick and mortar men's stores. BB/JAB/MW are all at risk over the next 10 years. Even higher end stores like Zegna and the like are at risk. There will be consolidation but a few flagships will remain. My guess is Europe and China will continue to create demand for higher end products made of better fabrics. It's not like human kind will suddenly stop appreciating the feel of fine fabrics - the hand of beautiful wools and silks - more just the average American will have no interest in wearing them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,716 Posts
Hey, what do you expect? I am a retiree. I relocated to central Florida and purchased a home in a development that is ensconced in a golf course and what is effectively a nature preserve, with several beautiful nature trails that are just begging to be explored. Leisure rules and the clothing I kept (after the move) and wear regularly reflects that reality. My daily uniform consists of chinos, vented fishing shirts, with the sleeves rolled to the elbow (I think the count is up to 17 at this point), and boat shoes or penny loafers. Suits and sport coats are reserved for Sunday services and even then, I am part of a very small minority that is wearing anything more than the casual wear that I described as my Monday through Saturday uniform(s) or, even worse, shorts and printed T-shirts:oops:! Five suits and perhaps 9 sport coats remain in my closet, mostly unworn. I fear that inventory of more dressy garments will continue to shrink as time passes. Egad...I think I may be going native! :eek: LOL.
My experience is almost exactly like Eagle's except that I have not moved out of the college town where I worked for 36 years. Daily wardrobe is washed khakis, polos in summer, LL Bean non iron OCBD in winter with sweaters and boat shoes or Timberland's with a tread for icy weather. Suits are down to five and sport coats are about ten in number and I've added a couple of "travel sport coats" that have several secure zippered pockets to hopefully ward off pickpockets when we're in Europe. I'm one of about two fellows who now wear a tie to church and our priest told both of us about two years ago, "hey- it's hot- you don't have to wear even the seersucker jackets now" Needless to say, we both resisted. Ive recently learned that he's not well and I may soon be the lone dinosaur in our parish. Not planning on checking out anytime soon but may well be a "singleton" in dressing for church.
SO BE IT!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,999 Posts
So I ask anyone interested in commenting, how do you dress these days, and not look as a relic?

Or do you just say (as I often do) that if people can put steel in their faces, and wear pajamas in public, how can anything that is classic style (or anything else these days for that matter) be considered weird?
Rule #1, dress in a manner you're most comfortable with. Everything is just tweeting around the edges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
My standard work wear is wool trousers and a dress shirt. Most men wear a polo and chinos. Our engineers typically wear jeans, sneakers, and a polo shirt. It used to be common for people to wear a suit for meetings with customers, auditors, etc. but not anymore. I'll occasionally wear a sport coat to church. We have a couple of work parties that I wear a suit to, and I also wear a suit when I take my daughter to the symphony. If I wore a suit to work, everyone would think I was going to a job interview.
 

·
Connoisseur/Curmudgeon Emeritus - Moderator
Joined
·
37,088 Posts
^^WA, you are absolutely right regarding the blazer designs utility.
A navy blazer is indeed a 'must have' in every gentleman's wardrobe. Four hang in my closet at the moment. If I have a blazer in any color, but navy, in my closet, Iam blissfully unaware and must consider such to be just another sport coat! LOL. ;)
 
1 - 20 of 83 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top