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Correct.
No.
 

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micahb2002:

Correct!!
The waistband of formal trousers must always be covered! This is dictated from the practice of wearing the jacket of White Tie open.
The formal shirt will have a pleated front (to the waist only, so that it doesn't buckle when you sit down) - that's the other reason (as we discussed in shirts above) the waist is always covered.

The choices are cummerbund (has nothing to do with holding up your pants), a vest or a double breasted dinner jacket which is never unbuttoned in public!
And you are not going to unbutton it are you?
 

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No no no, you never wear a cumber(some)bun round your middle with a double-breasted evening suit. Ideally the trousers should have a high rise with a split back and be held up with braces that button. No clip-ons, please. If braces aren't to your liking, side adjusters with buckles will do nicely.

Regarding wing-collared shirts: Unless you're a waiter in a restaurant, nobody wears winged shirts these days. You wear a folddown soft collar shirt,
always white, and a bow-tie. Whether the shirt has box pleats or not, it should be made of pique marcella or broadcloth and have double cuffs. Ideally the bow-tie should be the type you tie yourself. If you can tie your own shoes, you can master a bow at your neck. Practice! No clip-ons,
please.
 

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Why all the hate for the wing collar? I thought it did nicely here.

 

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Photos in magazines from the 30s 40s 50s and since show the vast majority of black tie ensembles to include a wing collar.

"nobody wears wing collars any more" ... well well well ... and "nobody" wears neckties or suits or well made shoes any more either, you might say ....

If you're going to wear a turn down collar with formalwear you might as well go the whole George Clooney and wear a four in hand tie.
 

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Though trhat is a recent (last 15 or so years) development. Throughout the 80s and up to the mid-90s nearly EVERYONE wore wing collars with black tie.
Bakc then turn down collars with black tie were considered "undressed".
In the 80's and 90's, the wing collar came back, but in the attached style. Before that in the 40's-60's soft turndown collars were what people were wearing. I've read that the Prince of Wales in the 1930's popularized the turndown collar with black tie. Turndown collars with black tie have a long history.
 

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...the Prince of Wales in the 1930's popularized the turndown collar with black tie...
Thank you for reminding us of this fact. In the post-DOW era, the turn-down collar, while OK, is not necessary for black tie/evening semi-formal. You may combine the turn-down collar with the DB PL tuxedo jacket if you wish, but, personally, I do not prefer it. The cummerbund is superfluous with the DB tux as the jacket will always be buttoned (at least when standing) so the waist band would not be exposed. You would already have a double layer of cloth over the stomach so the cummerbund would tend to make the wearer even warmer...
 

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I usually wear a wing collar shirt with a dinner jacket if it is worn as ersatz 'formal' wear. I think wing collars should be considered de rigeur for formal events. In it's proper place as informal dinner dress (ie how the Duke of Windsor wore it) then the turn down collar is preferable.

If the double breasted jacket is quite low cut then a white pique waistcoat would look splendid with it:
 

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In the 80's and 90's, the wing collar came back, .
Not sure I agree with that. As far as I'm aware the wing-collar was in constant use in the 20th c. i.e. had never gone away at some specific point in fashion-time. And there is plenty of ephemeral proof for this showing wing-collars throughout the whole of the 20th c.

but in the attached style. .
That is true. In fact I've never seen a new dress shirt on sale without its collar, requiring the wing-collar to be fitted by studs, other than in retro and antique clothes shops of course. Additionally I've never actually seen anyone wearing one.

My first and thankfully only international faux pas regarding wing-collars.
The first formal dinner I went to in Sweden (1997) I went in black tie and wing-collar of course. Well, the Swedes don't wear wing-collars at all I found out on that evening. The only other wing-collars present were on another ex-pat, from Hampshire. And on an ultra-anglophile Swede, who now he is retired seems to spend more time in England than in Sweden.

When a couple of years later I tried to buy a new wing-collar dress shirt in the best gentlemen's outfitters in town I was told in no uncertain terms that "We don't wear wing-collars in Sweden sir, so might I recommend this fine shirt"

Yes, you might. And I bought it. Since then I have never worn a wing-collar with black tie in Sweden.

However, I was at a black tie wedding in Denmark a few years ago and all the ex-pats there, myself included, wore wing-collars. Not a single turn down collar in sight. The Danes, to a man, turned up in lounge suits and lesser forms of dress.
 

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Yes, it is my opinion. Where did you see me claiming it was a standard?
Jovan,
Sorry.I was trying to answer your question on why all the hate for wing collar. The staements of dislike by some posters as a reason others should not wear them.
 
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