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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am a doctoral student working on my dissertation that investigates the difference between owning and accessing apparel, specifically more high-end or luxury apparel.

I was hoping to see if any of you had accessed clothing/accessories in the past from companies like Rent The Runway Unlimited, Eleven Jordan, or Mr Collection and if you would be willing to share your experiences: https://msstatebusiness.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0ktbYix3EvLIkcZ

Alternatively, if you are an owner of high-end apparel, I would love to hear your opinions as well: https://msstatebusiness.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6s1OJZAynNQq9XD

If you complete either survey within two weeks, you will be entered into a drawing to win one of two $100 gift cards.

Your opinions are important and your responses are anonymous and confidential. The survey should take 10-15 minutes to finish.

Thank you for your help!!
 

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Is your supervisory team aware that you are pestering gentlemen on the internet? Do you have ethical approval? Further have you considered researching something that matters? Social science! Pah!

At any rate I only rent my Solomons.
 

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The miserable pedant that occupies my soul has obliged me, despite my ferocious effort to contain its urging, to note that a dissertation is incompatible with doctoral study.

Thesis.

Not that I would honour such frivolous nonsense either way but, if you must, it is a thesis.

A joke - my PhD in Literature proves that Joseph K was simultaneously guilty and innocent.

I am so well educated that I have become stupid.
 

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Not to pile on the guy, but have post graduate studies come to a point where we need PhDs to ask and answer such questions.

I’m all in favor of the furtherance of human knowledge, but is this really a priority?
 

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The miserable pedant that occupies my soul has obliged me, despite my ferocious effort to contain its urging, to note that a dissertation is incompatible with doctoral study.

Thesis.

Not that I would honour such frivolous nonsense either way but, if you must, it is a thesis.

A joke - my PhD in Literature proves that Joseph K was simultaneously guilty and innocent.

I am so well educated that I have become stupid.
I wrote a dissertation for my PhD. A thesis is written for an MA.
 

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To: Jenn 2489

Imagine that there is a gentlemen's club (that now allows women as well, though the architecture and furnishings are still decidedly masculine) in a good but not ostentatious part of town. The club has a dress code, albeit modestly idiosyncratic (with some licence permitted older members). The regular members know each other, mutter greetings, are happy to engage in banter and learned discussion with equal pleasure and respect.

And suddenly, someone with a clipboard stands by the entrance to the club, accosting all and sundry with requests to answer questions about their attire. While there is nothing actually wrong with the request, it is not the kind of thing that members are particularly responsive to, and one or two might even think that this really is not "on".

This analogy, somewhat laboured though it is, is how I feel about your question.
 

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Honestly? I had a colleague who was a non-religious person (we did our undergrads together, he was an absolute and total idiot) do a thesis on "Sikhs in the 21st century". I suspect somebody had dared him to put that on a form over a night of heavy drinking. Somehow he got profiled in the alumni magazine as an up and coming writer on such a critical topic. I was not asked for a quote to describe his character.

In my undergrad, there was the option of doing something called an "honours thesis". I wrote mine on the international counterfeiting of wine. Mostly Canadian icewine and the problems with selling it internationally. I was a political science major, you'd expect that I would have picked a gripping and exciting topic, I just picked something over a bottle of sherry with friends.

As for asking people their opinions on renting apparel? I own everything in my closet.

This seems like the makings of a 1st year retail marketing major's term paper. If you are truly getting a doctorate over this, I pity your personal banker and whoever manages your trust fund.

Of course, I did have a retail marketing prof who, after getting her PhD, worked for Macy's as the person who designs window displays. She was quite a fan of Holt Renfrew and we had extensive conversations as to whether HR was a department store or a luxury brand retailer.



C.
 

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I did Philosophy. Mostly Carnap, Wittgenstein and Quine.
Am I supposed to be impressed? Really?

Ha.

Whereas you apparently didn't get up to speed on Carnap until your postgraduate endeavors, I proved myself to be quite the precocious Carnap expert by the time I was a mere 2 years of age. I could nod off in a heartbeat, no matter how contorted my body was. How about that?! By the time I was 4, I was the undisputed authority on all things Carnap, as I dramatically proved time and again during late-evening rides back home in the family station wagon after a long, action-packed day at my cousins' house.

And Wittgenstein, you say? Big deal. Suppose you try this: Try grappling with the formidable intellectual challenge posed by Guggenheim-Crazy Guggenheim, that is: the constantly-plastered character played in the mid-1960s by the late comedian Frank Fontaine on "The Jackie Gleason Show," of whose delicately perceptive humor and subtle yet incisive commentary on the human condition I was the master by the time I was a lad of 9.

I'll grant that it is profitable to note Wittgenstein's thoughts on death and eternity and on the strong influence that our interpretation of words and the context of words has on our ability to solve philosophical problems. His views on those topics are not unpersuasive. However, as you well know, Wittgenstein stubbornly (and inexplicably) disregarded the advice that every one of his academic colleagues (and his dry goods dealer) pleaded with him to heed: namely, that to ensure a lasting legacy, he deliver each of his lectures while bulging his eyes as much as possible; pretending to be roaring drunk; and laughing goofily after each sentence. Witty refused, leaving the path clear for Guggenheim to come along in the 1960s and take that advice to heart, thereby achieving lasting-and much-deserved-fame and acclaim. Writing scholarly books is well and good, but to secure a positive legacy that will never be extinguished, a true philosopher must perfect the art of looking bug-eyed, acting wasted, and giggling insanely on national television.

Philosophy students will be discussing the works of Crazy Guggenheim far into the next century and beyond, while your Dr. Wittgenstein, alas, is destined to become but a footnote in your discipline's scholarly literature on October 19, 2026. I think around 2 in the afternoon.

And Quine you say? Well la-de-da. Way back in 1965, at 10 years of age, I was an early adopter of Quisp, the sublimely delicious pre-sweetened cereal. You can have your Quine. See how much good he does you when you need breakfast but are pressed for time, or when you get the munchies at 10 pm, and they're the kind of munchies that can be satisfied only by the vaguely subversive act of eating cereal, and eating it far outside of usual breakfast time. See if Quine cuts it then. Quisp for me. Anyway, anything worth knowing gets printed on the back of cereal boxes sooner or later. Really. Go to a supermarket. Go to the cereal aisle. Read the back of each brand's box. That's a Harvard education right there.
 
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