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I purchased a suit from a department store and brought it to a tailor. He came highly recommended so I wanted to give him a try. My shoulders are somewhat broad so I needed to take in more than usual around the stomach area. Other than that, just a little off the waist from the pants and no cuffs. I also brought in a another suit jacket because I wanted to expand the back a little more, it was getting a little snug.

So basically, in the end, the price came out to be about $140 for the full suit and $60 for the suit jacket. Seems pretty high to me but this was my first time to an actual tailor, not a seamstress. Did I get ripped off?
 

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It would depend on exactly what work he did to flatten the stomach. Sounds to me that he did more than nip the waist. Perhaps he had to open the jacket up and bring some cloth in around the darts? I've had 'just' the waist taken in for around 50-70 bucks, but if it involved other subtle alterations, it can quickly add up.

If the jacket fits great now and looks great, I think it's money well spent. I always tip my tailor big because I know he's undercharging me on some of the work he does. I just appreciate true craftsmen and I hope people like him continue to do business.
 

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You probably paid a lttle more than if ...

you had purchased the clothes at a store and the store was doing the alterations. When a store is doing the alterations, they have the profit from the retail sale as well as the alterations pricing. You weren't trememdously over charged. If things fit, then get on with wearing the newly adjusted clothes. Next time, ask the price in advance.

I would never tip a tailor who owned his own business. He sets his own price and should be satisfied with that. Tipping an independent businessman just makes it harder for the next guy to do business with him. If he's not making enough, he can always raise his prices. Being a craftsman doesn't mean he is entitled to a tip.
 

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I would never tip a tailor who owned his own business. He sets his own price and should be satisfied with that. Tipping an independent businessman just makes it harder for the next guy to do business with him. If he's not making enough, he can always raise his prices. Being a craftsman doesn't mean he is entitled to a tip.
If you would **never** tip a tailor who owned his own business it's probably likely you never received exceptional service, i.e. above and beyond a reasonable expectation.

If you have received exceptional service and chose not to tip out of economic principle, then let's just say you and I are just two very different people.

I guess I'm just not as parsimonious as you. When I get exceptional service my natural inclination is to tip: not because I HAVE to but because I WANT to.
 

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I would never tip a tailor who owned his own business. He sets his own price and should be satisfied with that. Tipping an independent businessman just makes it harder for the next guy to do business with him. If he's not making enough, he can always raise his prices. Being a craftsman doesn't mean he is entitled to a tip.
I wouldn't tip a tailor either.

I think those alteration prices were too high...unless the tailor was adjusting your shoulders or something more substantial than you have indicated in your post. I mean, for an extra $50, you can get a new suit from the Wizard.
 
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