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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There have been a few questions about shoe 'construction' methods lately, and I thought it might be more useful to see an Allen Edmonds shoe de-constructed to examine the process...

Here is an open view of the details. So, the uppers are assembled, wrapped around the last and the insole is placed on the last. The leather insole has a glued on paper feather that is covered with cotton/linen and glue.

The upper assembly which consists of the upper, adhesive tape, layer of cotton (muslin?) and lining is stapled to the feather to secure it for stitching.

https://www.imageshack.us

https://www.imageshack.us

Then a multiple layer, twisted thread is used to sew the welt/upper/feather/insole together.

The welt has two seperate stitches run thru it - the single heavy stitch mentioned above, and then the outsole is secured to the welt (and therefore the upper assembly) by means of a lockstitch.

You can clearly see the two threads (one black, one white) that run thru the welt and 'lock' together in the welt photo. As you can also see, a glue/cork mixture is spread into the space created by the raised feather before the outsole is attached.

As for the upper assembly, here is a scan of the components that make up a toe box...

They are: upper leather, adhesive tape, cotton , paper with a glue covering, and the lining leather.

Hope this helps clear up how a 'welted shoe' is made.

The main difference between a 'welted' shoe and a 'Goodyear welted' shoe is that the insole should have a feather carved from the insole itself and the stitches that run thru the upper/lining/insole are done by hand. Also, this is a relatively minor distinction that I use more to seperate the truely handwelted shoes that I have (Borgioli Roma) and the many welted shoes that I carry.

I'll try and get a tear-up of a Blake shoe posted as well...
 
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