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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Off to The Oval for the Test this Saturday courtesy of a well known cricket brand. These things happen when you're a serious retailer of cricket equipment and apparel:icon_smile:
Now, I obviously know exactly what to sport at a Saturday at HQ, but in Sarf London?!

I'm thinking of forgoing the blazer for unstructured linen and chinos, maybe polo shirt and panama.....Lord help me....panama stands anyway, anywhere....

I do intend to watch Mr Pietersen's captaincy and not just chaff Chablis and tapas-esque nibbles.

Still, I have two wonderful days to ponder such.....
 

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That's excellent Simon. I'm very jealous.

I, and I am sure others, would be very keen to see if you were able to take any photos of the garb donned by those around you at the ground. Just out of curiosity. Or any sartorial notes that you could take during the quieter moments (hopefully a long Bell/Cook crease occupation or other such).

Enjoy yourself!
 

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Jolly good show. I don't mind test cricket at all.

It isn't that hard to explain to Americans who understand baseball. The difference is that there are effectively only two 'bases' - striker and non-striker's ends. After you hit the ball you don't have to run if you don't think you'll make it to the other end (ie no force outs), and can bat on almost endlessly once you do score. You can swing and miss as many times as you like and not get out unless you 'nick' (ie 'tip' in baseball parlance) the ball to a fielder or wicket keeper (ie 'catcher'). You only change sides once everyone is out.

The real trouble is to explain cricket to someone from Europe.

p.s. English summers usually require a trilby and an umbrella rather than a Panama don't they? :icon_smile_wink:
 

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Check with the ground - last time I was there there was a dress code for certain parts.

The 'smart' look for cricket is the same as for Henley - panama, blazer, striped shirt, club tie, khaki or white trousers, brown brogues.

I wouldn't wear a lounge suit as that just says 'sweaty corporate entertainment client' to me.

The dress down look for the stands is polo shirt, tilley hat, shades, khaki trousers, big picnic box.
 

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The Oval is fairly chilled out - any casual garb will do! It's a nice ground.

It isn't that hard to explain to Americans who understand baseball.
The most important thing to get them to understand is the key emotional difference between the games - in baseball, it's all about the runs - they're the rare event that you get a build-up of anticipation for, with strikes being relatively common. In cricket, you have to flip your expectations - the build-up is all about the next strike (wicket), with runs being relatively routine. Once they "get" that, the rules and pace of the game aren't difficult for them to understand and they can appreciate the game. :)
 

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Once they "get" that, the rules and pace of the game aren't difficult for them to understand and they can appreciate the game. :)
I had a South African girlfriend many years ago who explained the game to me and it isn't all that hard to pick up the elements of the sport. When Americans hear that test matches may go on for days, they don't realize that it's not much different than a series of games between two teams during the baseball season (each season made up of sets of three games between opponents, e.g. tomorrow our beloved Chicago Cubs start a three game "homestand" against the rival St. Louis Cardinals).

What I don't really understand is how cricket is organized, unlike other major sports (American football, Aussie rules, soccer/footie, basketball, rugby league/union)...in England, each county has its own team and these teams aren't for-profit enterprises, right? Is it like that in other Commonwealth countries? I know that there is a new Twenty20 cricket league in India that is organized more like other sports leagues.
 

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I had a South African girlfriend many years ago who explained the game to me and it isn't all that hard to pick up the elements of the sport. When Americans hear that test matches may go on for days, they don't realize that it's not much different than a series of games between two teams during the baseball season (each season made up of sets of three games between opponents, e.g. tomorrow our beloved Chicago Cubs start a three game "homestand" against the rival St. Louis Cardinals).

What I don't really understand is how cricket is organized, unlike other major sports (American football, Aussie rules, soccer/footie, basketball, rugby league/union)...in England, each county has its own team and these teams aren't for-profit enterprises, right? Is it like that in other Commonwealth countries? I know that there is a new Twenty20 cricket league in India that is organized more like other sports leagues.
It's not quite true that the English counties are not for profit. They would happily make profits if they could but the sad fact is that county cricket has never been a very profitable exercise and the counties have long existed on hand-outs from the England & Wales Cricket Board & its predecessors.

I'm not sure about the structure of the Indian Premier League, other than that its teams are franchises sold to the highest bidder. The original (and still extant) structure of Indian cricket was based around the major cities & states (for the Ranji Trophy) plus a zonal competition aimed at providing a more elite group of players for the Indian national team (the Duleep Trophy).

In my not so humble opinion Twenty20 is a grand debasement of everything that cricket should be. It's cricket with all the finesse, elegance and tactical subtlety removed.

And don't even get me started on the polyester jump suits :mad:
 

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I enjoy cricket, but I couldn't imagine sitting in the stands for an entire day dressed in anything more than casual attire. I mean, if you go to a ground in South Africa, all the young women are lying out in bikinis...which might be why I'm such a fan of the South African team despite having no other allegiance to the country.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Decisions have to be made, tonight and quickly as I'm taking the family to an open-air Alice In Wonderland production followed by a night in a hotel tomorrow, before a quick cab ride to the station and a quick cab ride at the other end to The Oval.
Boden blue/grey striped linen s/b jacket, pink Lacoste polo shirt(tucked-in), PCC beige linen trousers,Sebago brown deck shoes.
Pink/navy silk socks, White Rock (waterproof) sun hat.
Gunn & Moore rucksack for the Mac In A Sack, binoculars, good pork pies, Colmans mustard, sun cream(?), The Times etc.

....forecast is rain all day.....
 

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Thanks Sator for the explaination. I understand baseball which is supposed to be our national pastime and I think is one of the most boring team sports there is. Cricket, for me, might be its equal, but I am glad that the folks who enjoy it get to watch.

I will stick to motor racing, Jim.
 

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AHEM!!!

I may be French but I know what LBW stands for....:icon_smile:

So there!

Frog in Suit
Ah, but what about a chinaman? A googly? A doosra? A wrong'un? And just who is silly mid-off? Don't ask me - I just love listening to the TMS commentary from Blowers - Henry Blofeld (whose Dad was at school with Ian Flemming and is supposed to be the inspiration for Ernest Stavros Blofeld ) and the rest. Blowers normally wears a bow tie and a panama.
See
 
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