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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Knowing I have yet to catch up with current prices, come here to see if anyone has had a watch serviced and can help.

Asked a reputable watch service company for a quote to service the Aggisy and came back with a quote of $400. 馃槻 I thought $100 to $200... Is this a reasonable cost?

Sent back an inquiry of what the cost includes.

Than you all in advance.
 

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You鈥檒l find the costs will vary depending on the merchant.
The cost will also depend on what needs to be done.
Is there a reason you鈥檙e getting it serviced? Is it not keeping time properly?
 

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Service on automatic/manual watches can be dear, especially if a watch has not been serviced in a while and parts need replacing. Much like a car service. My sons recent (and past due mind you!) service on his run of the mill Longines ran about $600 on a watch that cost $3000 new.

It is specialty work and one must go to a qualified shop to get good guaranteed work. Any guy with a jewelers loop can claim to 鈥渟ervice鈥 a watch. In horology maintenance, one typically gets the service one pays for. I have not found any cheap shortcuts. Even qualified service in Asia was expensive.

Cheers,

BSR
 

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Service on my Rolex Sea-Dweller is about $1000, and that's about every decade or so. It's a 25 year old watch, and I use it as God intended (a "working" watch, diving, mountaineering, hot and muggy conditions, I've chopped wood and ice-climbed wearing it, etc).

It's maybe a $15,000 watch (these days), so service costing 7% or though of the value seems hardly unreasonable; one assumes part of the fee is simply insurance coverage for the repair process, so at least a portion of the repair fee is indexed to value.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You'll find the costs will vary depending on the merchant.
The cost will also depend on what needs to be done.
Is there a reason you're getting it serviced? Is it not keeping time properly?
Seems you missed the previous post so will say for all those that missed, the watch was found deep into a drawer full of papers in Oma's kitchen. Best guess it was Opa's and when the strap and crystal broke, was put in there until such time it was repaired.

Now, when attempting to wind, get no results. Being made during Longines ownership and love the appearance, rather take care of it and enjoy it many years. Meaning, not going to take it to anyone (as might be one of those who apply oil to an uncleaned movement).

Service on automatic/manual watches can be dear, especially if a watch has not been serviced in a while and parts need replacing. Much like a car service. My sons recent (and past due mind you!) service on his run of the mill Longines ran about $600 on a watch that cost $3000 new.

It is specialty work and one must go to a qualified shop to get good guaranteed work. Any guy with a jewelers loop can claim to "service" a watch. In horology maintenance, one typically gets the service one pays for. I have not found any cheap shortcuts. Even qualified service in Asia was expensive.

Cheers,

BSR
This is helpful seeing based also on the movement. The watch was created during Longines ownership, though not enough information to determine how much oversight they had. Good point about time between service, probably never had it so should be prepared for the quote to increase.

Service on my Rolex Sea-Dweller is about $1000, and that's about every decade or so. It's a 25 year old watch, and I use it as God intended (a "working" watch, diving, mountaineering, hot and muggy conditions, I've chopped wood and ice-climbed wearing it, etc).

It's maybe a $15,000 watch (these days), so service costing 7% or though of the value seems hardly unreasonable; one assumes part of the fee is simply insurance coverage for the repair process, so at least a portion of the repair fee is indexed to value.
Ouch! Myself quit wearing a $300 Tag Heuer as scared get robbed and was getting damaged. Now I would wear the Aggisy part of the time as the crystal already well scratched (probably because he was a flight engineer). Sadly now the Tag Heuer will need a service and battery as apparently even with the crown out they still drain. And no, when I was 20 and given to me as a gift didn't know anything about watches, other than dive watches were cool. Did take it scuba diving in Tahiti and was nice to have a countdown.
 

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I recently paid about $350 for service on a 30 year old Tag Heuer.
It's been just a couple of decades since I purchased my Tag Heuer Link Series Chronometer, but I can certainly feel your pain. During my ownership, I have had the band repaired once and replaced twice, which cost me just about what I originally paid for the watch. Add to that perhaps ten battery replacements and one general servicing and I'm in the proverbial 'hole,' spending more on maintenance that I paid for the watch. Owning and wearing a good watch is not cheap! Although, other that a $700 charge for servicing, my Rolex Air King has been reasonably economical. :icon_scratch:
 

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I own several nondescript watches from the '20s - '50s all of which cost (or were gifts that cost) $100-$300. (The watch in my avatar is one.)

For these, I've found that they need serving or some repair and servicing about every five years and that costs today (used to be less, but I don't own a time machine) $200 - $300.

Effectively, maintaining these old watches means you will all but "rebuy" them every five years and will pay several times the cost of owning them over the years.

To several of the comments above, I agree, there are no shortcuts - you need to find a good repair person and they all charge about the same. Sadly, in the twenty-plus years I've owned old watches, many of the old-time repair men have passed away and I'm finding it hard to find good, reputable ones now.

I have a few friends who own Rolex's, Tag's, etc. and they tell me that the authorized dealers for these watches charge three, four or more times what an regular watch repair guy will charge, but if you don't go to the dealer, you void the warranty, can hurt the resale value of the watch and, if the guy isn't good, end up paying more to have his bad work undone.

Some of those friends only go to authorized dealers and some have a good repair guy they trust and they use him to save money once the watch is out of warranty.

Several years ago, I bought a circa '50s Girard-Perregaux for about $250 that needed a new crystal and servicing. Stupid me, I went into the local GP dealer and was quoted (from memory) about $800 ("but sir, when they get it opened, it could be more and we need you to sign this release [or something] acknowledging your responsibility if the cost exceeds the estimate").

Uh-huh. I took my watch and went to an old-watch repair guy who did it all for (from memory) ~$200 and it was five years 'till I needed to service it again (and the crystal's still perfect).

That said, my Perregaux was bought second hand and was long since out of warranty, so I did what I did - I am not recommending doing that for expensive watches still in warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'd have Mark Sirianni [email protected] take a look at it. He does work at a reasonable price.
Seems more honest to have the prices right on the homepage. Nothing stating will not clean and oil a mechanical Timex (Brother found Dad's and gave it to me) so will give a call Monday. The period literature from Timex says to leave the movement together when cleaning and oiling, so hopefully can. If can, then ask about the Aggisy.

I own several nondescript watches from the '20s - '50s all of which cost (or were gifts that cost) $100-$300. (The watch in my avatar is one.)

For these, I've found that they need serving or some repair and servicing about every five years and that costs today (used to be less, but I don't own a time machine) $200 - $300.

Effectively, maintaining these old watches means you will all but "rebuy" them every five years and will pay several times the cost of owning them over the years.

To several of the comments above, I agree, there are no shortcuts - you need to find a good repair person and they all charge about the same. Sadly, in the twenty-plus years I've owned old watches, many of the old-time repair men have passed away and I'm finding it hard to find good, reputable ones now.

I have a few friends who own Rolex's, Tag's, etc. and they tell me that the authorized dealers for these watches charge three, four or more times what an regular watch repair guy will charge, but if you don't go to the dealer, you void the warranty, can hurt the resale value of the watch and, if the guy isn't good, end up paying more to have his bad work undone.

Some of those friends only go to authorized dealers and some have a good repair guy they trust and they use him to save money once the watch is out of warranty.

Several years ago, I bought a circa '50s Girard-Perregaux for about $250 that needed a new crystal and servicing. Stupid me, I went into the local GP dealer and was quoted (from memory) about $800 ("but sir, when they get it opened, it could be more and we need you to sign this release [or something] acknowledging your responsibility if the cost exceeds the estimate").

Uh-huh. I took my watch and went to an old-watch repair guy who did it all for (from memory) ~$200 and it was five years 'till I needed to service it again (and the crystal's still perfect).

That said, my Perregaux was bought second hand and was long since out of warranty, so I did what I did - I am not recommending doing that for expensive watches still in warranty.
What a post, more than asked for.

See, this trend of owning a non-quartz watch never mentions the operational costs. Oh sure, you can purchase that brand new $100 mechanical watch, though come to find out can't be serviced. Or that $300 automatic has to have a $500 service every five years. At least was aware there would be an operational cost, though didn't expect it to be this high.

I found the company though their YouTube channel. Mostly sell vintage watches, though before sold serviced by an older fellow with certifications. Realizing the need, now also service outside watches. However, I would feel more comfortable having more than one to obtain a quote.

Though the advantage with vintage is less initial cost with about the same operational cost (plus in my opinion a reasonable case size). Though will not be purchasing another anytime soon!

Goodness, what a markup by the GP dealer! Maybe a reason to purchase out of warranty so don't have to take to the dealer.
 

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Living in the NY area spoils you. You go to a watch repairer on 47th/48th, they can find parts for old movements easily, and it's competitive so prices aren't too high. I needed a mainspring replaced for a 50s Longines. $100 all in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Living in the NY area spoils you. You go to a watch repairer on 47th/48th, they can find parts for old movements easily, and it's competitive so prices aren't too high. I needed a mainspring replaced for a 50s Longines. $100 all in.
You don't know how bad I wish I had the funds to travel to New York for sartorial reasons. Though at this point not happening. I had a trip planned about five years ago, included New England and Canada, then few months before leaving Grandmother diagnosed with cancer and given three months, so didn't want to be back there when she passed. Turns out she made it almost seven months and that Summer we as a family had a wonderful time.
 

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Living in the NY area spoils you. You go to a watch repairer on 47th/48th, they can find parts for old movements easily, and it's competitive so prices aren't too high. I needed a mainspring replaced for a 50s Longines. $100 all in.
Hi, would you be okay with giving me the name/exact address of your watch guy as he sounds better priced than mine, Thank you.
 

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In defense of "costly to maintain" watches:

I bought my Sea Dweller in 1994; I still have all the "stuff" (Box, manual, documentation, receipt, even the spare bracelet links from having it fitted at purchase). My local Rolex dealer has mentioned it's worth about $10,000, realistically, to a collector.

I bought it for $3500 (new, in 1994.)

I've put $2200 into it (service, bracelet repair), so my total investment is $5700, which means I'm $4300 ahead in value. Hardly a retirement plan, but not too bad!

(I"d have to look up its insurance value - I know I was pretty creative. Maybe $12,000 or so?... but that would be some fire, destroying a Sea Dweller!)

If you stick to the definitive, core pieces, a luxury watch *is* an investment.

DH
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
In defense of "costly to maintain" watches:

I bought my Sea Dweller in 1994; I still have all the "stuff" (Box, manual, documentation, receipt, even the spare bracelet links from having it fitted at purchase). My local Rolex dealer has mentioned it's worth about $10,000, realistically, to a collector.

I bought it for $3500 (new, in 1994.)

I've put $2200 into it (service, bracelet repair), so my total investment is $5700, which means I'm $4300 ahead in value. Hardly a retirement plan, but not too bad!

(I"d have to look up its insurance value - I know I was pretty creative. Maybe $12,000 or so?... but that would be some fire, destroying a Sea Dweller!)

If you stick to the definitive, core pieces, a luxury watch *is* an investment.

DH
Interesting, appreciate the information.

Seems inflation wasn't considered? That $3,500 in today's dollar is $6,000. Let's say about $3,000 in repairs adjusted for inflation, so all in $9,000. Still a profit rather than a loss.

The question then is what brands at least hold value? How about vintage Wittnauer? If so, then spending an amount to keep its value makes financial sense. Just to toss out there, how about vintage Tudor?

By the way, just the other day had the similar realization about inflation regarding stock's dividends. They pay about the same as inflation and instead the return is on the sale of the share(s). So one can't easily live on dividends and due to the hands off approach of my Brother (meaning does not want to actively trade), need to focus on the basics, such as replenishing my wardrobe after outgrowing or wearing out all my shirts and pants. Which of course I am greatly looking forward to, being have learned so much since their purchase, thanks to this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'd have Mark Sirianni [email protected] take a look at it. He does work at a reasonable price.
@cdavant, Mark Sirianni is one of the worst snobs I ever met. Apparently he only services watches newer than 10 years old and now because has a backlog, only taking Rolex watches. So guess either you have a newer watch or got lucky, shame such a resource has been lost.

Same with sewing machines, no one here will repair a machine over ten years old. I have a top of the line 1980s sewing machine that my Grandfather bought for his daughter's home economics degree, only used a few times, though a plastic gear broke and now has to go in the recycle (still struggling to do that). Welcome to capitalism at its finest.

Will PM @StephenRG and see if he has a name for this $100 repair shop.
 

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@cdavant, Mark Sirianni is one of the worst snobs I ever met. Apparently he only services watches newer than 10 years old and now because has a backlog, only taking Rolex watches.
So he's a snob because he has a successful business and is limiting his work? Would you rather he accept every watch that comes his way and then make you wait an unacceptable amount of time for repair? Just wow. SMH.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So he's a snob because he has a successful business and is limiting his work? Would you rather he accept every watch that comes his way and then make you wait an unacceptable amount of time for repair? Just wow. SMH.
It was his attitude that only Rolex watches are worth repair, even if a fine Swiss watch. If his website said only repairs Rolex, then neither of us would have our time wasted (for example, I wouldn't take a Mercedes to a Ford repair shop). Is Longines and Tudor not quality?

Myself, don't see backlog as good business practice as means don't have time management skill. How hard is it to say you are no longer taking in watches? My friend who does high end Mercedes restorations finally had to, otherwise very probable of having further heart trouble. Even I am right now getting rid of projects as realizing I don't have the time to get everything done, despite the huge financial impact. We must learn how to say no and accept we can only do so much.
 
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