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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I just received in the mail a new navy Hardwick suit I purchased recently. It's a phenomenal fit; I'm very pleasantly surprised such a fit can be obtained for me off-the-rack.
However I was also surprised that such a highly-reputed suit was so light, especially in the chest, and the fabric so rough (98%/2% wool/Lycra; Super 100s). Are Hardwick suits canvassed at all? My understanding is that they are half-.
Is wool fabric weight necessarily indicative of quality?
Any other great, economic options for conservative suits that have some weight to them?

Thanks for your input and help!
 

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(98%/2% wool/Lycra; Super 100s).
I don't know how a blend of wool/Lycra ( 98/2 ) equates to super 100 wool. The so called super numbers are generally assigned to all wool fabric.

Is wool fabric weight necessarily indicative of quality?
Not necessarily, but manufactures would like you to believe they do by assigning those super numbers. Weights are generally given as grams/ounces per square meter/yard fabric. A good quality lightweight wool will weigh considerably less than a good quality heavy wool fabric, both are good quality fabric.
Hang out for the technical, scientific, voodoo magic.
 

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If Wikipedia can be believed, the standard does apply to both wool and wool blends...

The International Wool Textile Organisation (IWTO) is the promulgator of the Fabric Labelling Code of Practice which governs the use of the "S" and "Super S" designations for fine wool and wool blend fabrics. (Underline added.) The Code defines the S number by correlation to maximum fiber diameter. For example, 80s must have maximum fiber diameter of 19.75 micrometres or finer and 90s, 19.25 micrometres or finer. This scale continues to the 210s at 13.25 micrometre or finer. Thus each step of ten (as from 80s to 90s or 90s to 100s) corresponds to 0.5 micrometre less in allowed maximum fiber diameter. It has been proposed to extend the scale to 250s at 11.25 micrometre or finer.

In the United States labeling of wool products is regulated by the Wool Products Labeling Act of 1939 (15 U.S.C. § 68). The Act was modified, for wool products manufactured on or after January 1, 2007, by the Wool Suit Fabric Labeling Fairness and International Standards Conforming Act which defined the use of the Super S and S designations in a manner conforming to the IWTO Code. The U.S. defines the S numbers for 80s to 250s. Violation of the WPLA may carry a substantial penalty.

Source
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S_number_(wool)
 

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If Wikipedia can be believed, the standard does apply to both wool and wool blends...

The International Wool Textile Organisation (IWTO) is the promulgator of the Fabric Labelling Code of Practice which governs the use of the "S" and "Super S" designations for fine wool and wool blend fabrics. (Underline added.) The Code defines the S number by correlation to maximum fiber diameter. For example, 80s must have maximum fiber diameter of 19.75 micrometres or finer and 90s, 19.25 micrometres or finer. This scale continues to the 210s at 13.25 micrometre or finer. Thus each step of ten (as from 80s to 90s or 90s to 100s) corresponds to 0.5 micrometre less in allowed maximum fiber diameter. It has been proposed to extend the scale to 250s at 11.25 micrometre or finer.

In the United States labeling of wool products is regulated by the Wool Products Labeling Act of 1939 (15 U.S.C. § 68). The Act was modified, for wool products manufactured on or after January 1, 2007, by the Wool Suit Fabric Labeling Fairness and International Standards Conforming Act which defined the use of the Super S and S designations in a manner conforming to the IWTO Code. The U.S. defines the S numbers for 80s to 250s. Violation of the WPLA may carry a substantial penalty.

Source
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S_number_(wool)
To the OP, did you get all that. Arm yourself with this knowledge. You were warned. Pose this info the next time your dealing with a SA. or when purchasing online.
 

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If Wikipedia can be believed, the standard does apply to both wool and wool blends...

The International Wool Textile Organisation (IWTO) is the promulgator of the Fabric Labelling Code of Practice which governs the use of the "S" and "Super S" designations for fine wool and wool blend fabrics. (Underline added.) The Code defines the S number by correlation to maximum fiber diameter. For example, 80s must have maximum fiber diameter of 19.75 micrometres or finer and 90s, 19.25 micrometres or finer. This scale continues to the 210s at 13.25 micrometre or finer. Thus each step of ten (as from 80s to 90s or 90s to 100s) corresponds to 0.5 micrometre less in allowed maximum fiber diameter. It has been proposed to extend the scale to 250s at 11.25 micrometre or finer.

In the United States labeling of wool products is regulated by the Wool Products Labeling Act of 1939 (15 U.S.C. § 68). The Act was modified, for wool products manufactured on or after January 1, 2007, by the Wool Suit Fabric Labeling Fairness and International Standards Conforming Act which defined the use of the Super S and S designations in a manner conforming to the IWTO Code. The U.S. defines the S numbers for 80s to 250s. Violation of the WPLA may carry a substantial penalty.

Source
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S_number_(wool)
Are we to guess at what they mean by wool blends.
Wool/cashmere.
Wool/alpaca.
Merino/cashmere.
Vicuna/ cashmere, if such a thing exists, etc.
Wool/silk.
Wool/silk/cotton

No mention of wool/synthetic blends or is it implied?
I find no mention of wool/synthetic in the code but, I could be wrong.
Manufacturers have a way of persuading such organizations to change the codes to suit them, no pun intended.
 

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Hi everyone,

I just received in the mail a new navy Hardwick suit I purchased recently. It's a phenomenal fit; I'm very pleasantly surprised such a fit can be obtained for me off-the-rack.
However I was also surprised that such a highly-reputed suit was so light, especially in the chest, and the fabric so rough (98%/2% wool/Lycra; Super 100s). Are Hardwick suits canvassed at all? My understanding is that they are half-.
Is wool fabric weight necessarily indicative of quality?
Any other great, economic options for conservative suits that have some weight to them?

Thanks for your input and help!
It depends on what you bought. Prior to their acquisition in 2014, everything was fused only. When they were acquired and the factory and product line overhauled, they were taught how to make half canvas and all the fits were remade; all of the suits and most of the sport coats were made like this, but there was a line of very softly constructed sport coats which were fused, only in order to maintain the most lightweight and soft construction possible. In fact, being a southern company, lightness in general was strongly emphasized, in stark contrast to the heavy, stiff poly/wool they had been making prior to the acquisition.

Post either the tag from inside the breast pocket or the model name and I can tell you with more certainty what it is you bought.

You will not find a better value for made in America clothing, if you want something comparably priced you will have to look at offshore products.
 

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It depends on what you bought. Prior to their acquisition in 2014, everything was fused only. When they were acquired and the factory and product line overhauled, they were taught how to make half canvas and all the fits were remade; all of the suits and most of the sport coats were made like this, but there was a line of very softly constructed sport coats which were fused, only in order to maintain the most lightweight and soft construction possible. In fact, being a southern company, lightness in general was strongly emphasized, in stark contrast to the heavy, stiff poly/wool they had been making prior to the acquisition.

Post either the tag from inside the breast pocket or the model name and I can tell you with more certainty what it is you bought.

You will not find a better value for made in America clothing, if you want something comparably priced you will have to look at offshore products.
Excellent post, most informative to the OP. who's query was a simple one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for letting me know @jefferyd. I agree it's a good value, it just depends I suppose what someone is looking for in terms of style; it's a nice conservative suit.

Do you have any other recommendations for half-canvassed suits in the Hardwick price neighborhood (not necessarily made in America)? I have a Charles Tyrwhitt suit in my closet now; while the drape is actually quite nice, the fabric is really so-so, so. Lots of great designers, tailors and so forth out there, the problem is I wear a 44R jacket and 44 waist trousers, so short of made-to-measure I'm left with separates.

Thanks for all your input.
 
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