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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're attending an animal rescue league fundraiser next week, and it's been strongly suggested the attire is "cocktail." Lord knows I've been to plenty of these types of things, and I've normally worn a suit if its in the evening, or a sports coat (sometimes with a tie, sometimes without) if its during the day.

Similarly, we're attending a fundraiser in two weeks for the Truman Presidential Library. The attire on that invitation is listed as "business attire."

Is there really any difference between "cocktail" and "business" attire? Or, is this more for the benefit of women?
 

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I think it's more or less for the ladies ...

Cocktail attire would mean a suit for you and a dressier dress or pants suit for the lady. Business attire means about the same. Some seem to think that women always get it right, but recently, I've seen so many improperly dressed women that I thinke the distaff sides needs an AAAC (Ask Ann?). One of the things I've noticed, is older women wearing a dress without hose. Someone needs to tell them that this may be ok for the 'Sex in the City' actresses, but older women with bruises and veins need to cover them up.
 

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We're attending an animal rescue league fundraiser next week, and it's been strongly suggested the attire is "cocktail." Lord knows I've been to plenty of these types of things, and I've normally worn a suit if its in the evening, or a sports coat (sometimes with a tie, sometimes without) if its during the day.

Similarly, we're attending a fundraiser in two weeks for the Truman Presidential Library. The attire on that invitation is listed as "business attire."

Is there really any difference between "cocktail" and "business" attire? Or, is this more for the benefit of women?
No difference!

If you review the article "Cracking the Dress Code" linked from the Home Page:

BASICS


How to Look Your best


DAY or EVENING INFORMAL (Don't think casual!) also COCKTAIL, or BUSINESS ATTIRE: This requires a business suit, necktie, lace-up shoes, and for evening occasions a non-button-down collar dress shirt.

Make certain that the person sending out the invitations really means informal and not casual since this is a common misconception!

There is also Business Casual!:

BUSINESS, also EXECUTIVE- or CORPORATE CASUAL: The level beneath the business suit and tie, which can consist of a suit or sport jacket and/or sweater, and an optional tie. This is what you'd wear to a company party (retirement, holiday, etc.). The fabrics may be less dressy, and the tie a knit or novelty print. You may have slightly relaxed the look, but you're still there for business.​
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
And I'm almost ready to have a cocktail wearing a Rugby shirt and khaki's!! :icon_smile_big:
Thanks for the reminder about the article, Andy. It's been awhile since I've read it...good refresher.

Wrapping up some work, then it's cocktail time for me too. Beautiful day in The Heartland. I think there's a Tanqueray Gimlet in my very near future!
 

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Did someone say "cocktails"?
I'll take a beefeaters martini with a twist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
tmmkc

What is you recipe for a gimlet?
I like mine a tad more "limey" than most, so I use a 2.5-1 ratio of gin to lime juice (traditionally it's a 3-1 ratio). If I have the time, I will squeeze my own lime juice and make my own simple syrup. If not, Rose's lime juice will do.
 

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I like mine a tad more "limey" than most, so I use a 2.5-1 ratio of gin to lime juice (traditionally it's a 3-1 ratio). If I have the time, I will squeeze my own lime juice and make my own simple syrup. If not, Rose's lime juice will do.
So there has to be some sugar syrup in it?

I ask because one of the favourite characters of fiction, Philip Marlowe, orders one in the The Long Goodbye- which I think is the best book of the 'series'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So there has to be some sugar syrup in it?
Certainly. I prefer to make my own, which is really easy: About a 1/2 sugar over medium heat with a little water. Simmer and stir it until a syrup forms. Let it cool to room temperature, mix with lime juice and gin, and enjoy! What ever you do, don't leave the syrup unattended while its cooking!

I like to mix my own lime juice and simple syrup because I find the pre-packed stuff too sweet.
 

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Did someone say "cocktails"?
I'll take a beefeaters martini with a twist.
 

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No difference!

DAY or EVENING INFORMAL (Don't think casual!) also COCKTAIL, or BUSINESS ATTIRE: This requires a business suit, necktie, lace-up shoes, and for evening occasions a non-button-down collar dress shirt.
I'd have to differ. When I hear "business attire", I figure I'm good to go with the suits I wear to work. "Cocktail attire" means I can pull out the dreaded black suit, or more frequently, a subtle Glen Plaid that I think is too nice for daily wear.

Interested in the Forum's opinion, but I don't wear a pocket square to work (I think it would come across at TOO much), but don't hesitate to wear one on those "cocktail" occasions.
 

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...Wrapping up some work, then it's cocktail time for me too. Beautiful day in The Heartland. I think there's a Tanqueray Gimlet in my very near future!
I knew there were more reasons than your casserole jokes that I liked you! A Gimlet! My favorite warm-weather cocktail. And it seems you make it the way I do, too, which means right. :icon_smile:
 

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cocktail attire

We're attending an animal rescue league fundraiser next week, and it's been strongly suggested the attire is "cocktail." Lord knows I've been to plenty of these types of things, and I've normally worn a suit if its in the evening, or a sports coat (sometimes with a tie, sometimes without) if its during the day.

Similarly, we're attending a fundraiser in two weeks for the Truman Presidential Library. The attire on that invitation is listed as "business attire."

Is there really any difference between "cocktail" and "business" attire? Or, is this more for the benefit of women?
I believe there is a difference. I think business attire is more like a grey pinstripe daytime go to work type outfit, which in a cocktail environment looks like you just got off work and didn't have time to change. You may want to make inquiry as to how those inviting define "cocktail." I forget the term for a garment other than a tuxedo, that looks similar: dark, elegant, but not a suit. I just don't recall right now. Otherwise, it might be dark, refined attire which is not a suit. Sorry for being so vague, but I realize the issue exists.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I knew there were more reasons than your casserole jokes that I liked you! A Gimlet! My favorite warm-weather cocktail. And it seems you make it the way I do, too, which means right. :icon_smile:
That's a reflief!:icon_smile: Despite our recent Interchange debates, at least we'll always have tuna hot dish and gimlets!

We tried out a new restaurant last night, and I ordered a Hendrick's gimlet (for a change) before dinner. More cucumber than juniper...I'll stick with Tanqueray. It was still very good, enough so that I said to my wife: "The problems with gimlets is that one isn't enough, and two is too many."

Back to the thread...thanks all for the advice. The "business attire" function is fairly self-explanatroy. I did inquire a little further on the other "cocktail attire" function. I was told a suit may be a little too much, but considering it starts at 5 p.m., a sports coat and tie would be acceptable.
 
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