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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m ordering a pair of black custom gloves for cold-weather wear. They offer several linings, including silk, fleece, wool, cashmere, suede and rabbit. Suggestions? It doesn’t usually get that cold here, but we’ve had a run of sub-freezing days.
 

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I'm ordering a pair of black custom gloves for cold-weather wear. They offer several linings, including silk, fleece, wool, cashmere, suede and rabbit. Suggestions? It doesn't usually get that cold here, but we've had a run of sub-freezing days.
I've always found cashmere linings best in dress gloves. Obviously, they're soft, but they're also warm. Over the years I've had plenty of gloves with rabbit, and surprisingly they weren't as warm, plus they add bulk. Wool is fine, though it's not as warm or soft. Silk is fine if you're not going to wear them in the cold, and I would think suede would be similar. I've never had fleece, and it might be a practical alternative for more sporting gloves.
 

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Cashmere lining is warm, but not as warm as fleece (meaning actual fleece, not synthetic fleece). If memory serves, C.J. offers a lambskin glove with a shearling lining, so that would probably be their warmest item. I will say that shearling doesn't last as long as a cashmere lining; with frequent wearing (probably not the case in NC), it's a two-season glove. You'd probably get 4-5 good years out of them.

A good glove collection (in my experience) is an unlined glove, a cashmere lined glove, and a shearling lined glove, plus whatever technical gloves you need for skiing, gardening, shooting, etc.

Like you, I've been enjoying temperatures in the teens here in Atlanta. I have technical gloves easily up to the task (I work in Antarctica on occasion, so I have some extreme gear), but when it's stupidly cold AND I want to look like a gentleman, I enjoy a Swedish glove brand (Hestra) which makes a very nice lambskin-lined glove, among some other kinds of arctic leathers (elk and so on). Pricier (much) than Chester Jeffries, but as those of us from the frozen North can attest, keeping the hands and feet warm is nine-tenths of staying cozy!

https://hestragloves.com/dress/en-us/gloves/table-cut/20090-peccary-handsewn-lambskin-lined/710/
 

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Even though I like the feel of cashmere, I have become disenchanted with it as a glove liner.

They're not that warm. For warmth wool or rabbit are my warmest. Cashmere is pretty close to silk IMO. Yet wool or fur do not make for a sleek dress glove.

All my cashmere gloves have had the lining fail way before the leather. Silk in my experience lasts longer. I have not had wool or fur fail before the gloves did. I have thrown out many serviceable cashmere lined gloves. It never seemed worth the money to have them relined.

I've never tried lambskined limed gloves. The combination of durability and thinness is appealing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The old gloves I’ve been wearing are wool-lined and a fairly inexpensive pair that I’ve owned for years. I have long hands and fingers, so I finally decided to pull the trigger on custom fitted gloves. On average, they will probably be worn a couple of weeks a year at most, so I’m not terribly concerned about durability. I may even think about a second pair after paying the £20 pattern fee. CJ is about as expensive as I’m willing to go. Based on replies here, I’m thinking cashmere might be a good choice.
 

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Cashmere and cashmere are often two (or more) different things. Some cashmere linings are thin and not particularly warm, others are thick and toasty. Rabbit fur can likewise be cut at different length and give different degrees of insulation.

Where both fur and cashmere are concerned it also matters a lot how tight-fitting the gloves are. Neither material provides a given amount of insulation in and of itself, their insulating properties are determined by the amount of air trapped. Hence a pair of tight-fitting gloves will never be as warm as one which fits looser, given the same insulating material. That's just simple thermodynamics. :D

I own two pairs of gloves with rabbit fur lining of pretty much the same (initial) thickness. One pair is shop-bought, because they looked good. They're very tight and not at all warm because the fur is compressed and there's no room for air to be trapped. The other is made to measure, fairly loose and the warmest pair I own.

In the past I've owned gloves with a thin cashmere lining which might just as well have been absent altogether for all the warmth it provided. On the other hand my current cashmere lined gloves, all made to measure and with thicker linings, are pretty toasty.

Basically there's no rule as to whether cashmere or fur is warmer/better, it all comes down to a combination of the quality/thickness of the lining and the fit of the gloves.

Wool, wool fleece and silk I have no experience with, but a good synthetic fleece traps more air than almost anything else. The downside is that its insulation properties drops to near zero once it gets damp or wet. It does, however, dry far quicker than other materials. It takes on body odour much easier than wool (or cashmere and fur) though and a nice pair of leather gloves can't really be washed.

For the sparing use you specify I would suggest that both fur and cashmere are equally suitable. Just make sure the fit is right and not too tight and that a good quality lining is used.
 
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