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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having just read the "Tell us about yourself" thread in 'Andy's Fashion Forum', I'm amazed at the range of occupations there are on the site, and felt like some of this knowledge should be tapped for the young member of AAAC forums who are thinking about potential careers.

What sort of advice would you give to people chosing their career, or yourself if you got to chose all over again?

How important do you think your degree choice was in your career? Should I just chose something I enjoy and go for it, or should I think about my career choices first?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As a mentor, the advice I give the most is: There is no such thing as "job security." There is only "market security." This is an absolute statement and the world is much grayer, but I am usually trying to wake up people that are RIP or ROAD.

Most people are "good at something", but fail to acquire skills and credentials that keep them marketable; either as an employee or a business. They incorrectly focus on "getting and keeping their job."

I was watching Jamie Dimon CEO of JPM Chase speak just today and he said the top talent always finds good paying jobs.

Along the same thought path, don't think about getting your "degree" think about "credentials."

Following the "get degree, get job, punch clock 9-5" roadmap can work, but it leaves you on the tail end of the dog sometimes.

Good Luck!
From what you are saying, the package of skills I am going to need will change over time, and will be developed on the job. Would you therefore advise that I get a degree in order to broaden myself and add to my education, therefore go for something like a liberal arts degree, such as philosophy (probably one of my favorite areas of study)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, that depends.

Is it your desire to be a teacher or professor of philosophy?

When evaluating your choices ask yourself what marketable skills you learn in a specific curriculum?

While studying philosophy may make you better at something else it may or may not be marketable. For example, I think I would feel better if my doctor studied philosophy (she makes some very narrow-minded recommendations sometimes), but I'm glad her degree is in medicine. :icon_smile_wink:
Career choice wise, I'm considering Sales, Senior Executive/Management Roles later on in my career, possibly Managemnt consulting and Law. Obviously the degree teaches a great deal of critical thinking and analytic skills, and then any practical skills are built up on the job. Does this sound like I'm going the right way about things?
 
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