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I watched two interviews with Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger recently. He's the Pilot of Flight 1549 that ditched in the Hudson.

The first was with Katie Couric on 60 Minutes and then the next night with Charles Gibson on ABC Nightly News.

No comparison! Couric asked the dumbest questions ever. Did someone write those out for her? Did no one review the questions before the interview?

And I'm all for no emotional involvement in a news interview, but not total indifference and no feelings! Couric may be a robot! I'm certainly not one to denigrate a person's IQ, but Couric's may be suspect! I'll guess around 85!

Gibson, by comparison, was warm and friendly and got more information out of Sully. It was like two guys casually talking in a bar.

The above is my humble opinion only!
 

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I was kind of surprised to see that Katie Couric was doing a program of pre-Grammy interviews the other night. It seemed to me that that is exactly the kind of thing that confirms her image as a lightweight in people's eyes.

On the other hand, she is cute as a button, and what more could you ask for in a national journalist?

On the Sullenberger thing, haven't we heard just about enough? Sure, it was a remarkable event, and he deserves credit for bringing the plane and passengers in safely, but it really has no broader implications for our understanding of the world, our society, or life in general. Just another brand of celebrity gossip.
 

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On the Sullenberger thing, haven't we heard just about enough? Sure, it was a remarkable event, and he deserves credit for bringing the plane and passengers in safely, but it really has no broader implications for our understanding of the world, our society, or life in general. Just another brand of celebrity gossip.

It's a form of anxiety-management through a fantasy narrative.

The plane is the United States of America. Sully is the mythical hero with super-human abilities who miraculously saves us from disaster. He is the benevolent-though-distant father-figure, calm and capable, protecting his helpless children.

In this case, the pilot genuinely saved everyone's lives with his experience and skill. Fine. The problem is the use of this event as a metaphor. It becomes a kind of mythology when extended to other areas, such as government, for example. When people interpret events through the lens of a false mythology, they fail to see reality, even when it is BLARING at them like a siren. Instead, all they see is the fantasy.

Which leads to problems.
 

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Andy,
Once all the hoopla and confetti gets swept up, and he is legally free to discuss flight details: My website has a interview with Captain Scully. We will be talking in depth about dressing safely on commercial flights.
 

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Couric asked the dumbest questions ever. Did someone write those out for her? Did no one review the questions before the interview?
Couric is an annoying little (albiet cute in her younger days) troll. I've never felt she's a very good journalist.
 

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I strongly suspect Katie Couric is the least skilled journalist to ever hold an evening news anchor position with a major network! She should have struck with the AM news entertainment shows...that is surely where she belongs.
 

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The whole crew was on Letterman last night. It was very funny. Apparently one guy stripped down to his underwear once the palne touched down ready to make a swim for it. I laughed becaused I imagined it being some AAAC member protecting their clothing.
 

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The whole crew was on Letterman last night. It was very funny. Apparently one guy stripped down to his underwear once the palne touched down ready to make a swim for it. I laughed becaused I imagined it being some AAAC member protecting their clothing.
That is a funny thought. I have a vision of an AAAC guy out there in the Hudson, sculling with one arm while holding a pair of shell AE's high with the other.
 

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Unfortunatly the good Captain risks over-exposure at this point. Interveiws by the insipid Couric and Gibson, having to dredge for profundities to reply with, edited here and there to insert interveiwers facial expression after answer that wasnt to the question, aaaggghhhh!!.

Re-union of crew and passengers and breif unedited interveiw with AP pool, great, but we dont need more than that.

The Capt is no doubt a humble man who may have some post-traumatic stress to deal with (though not neary as much some passengers and the stew from the back), I would hate for him to have to also come crashing down from his 15 minutes of fame.

NY magazine dubbed him the "Last Aviatior" as if to imply that they dont make em like him anymore. I would submit that we have many such hereos amongst us, they just may never get a chance to demonstrate such. They are born and bred in parts of the country that NY media types refer to as flyover country or red states, maybe the outer boros, begin their adult lives in the US Military or municipal uniformed services, may be educated, if at all, at the service academies or colleges on no NY media types kid's A list, and opt for less than glamourous or highly renumerative careers that nonetheless make a difference, and occasionally may requires them to perform highly skilled or heroic feats under less than ideal circumstances. When one does though, pampered media types seem to have far more need to mince and fawn over them than those of us not so out of touch with our fellow Americans.

I would love to buy Capt Sully a beer, but I wish he would stay away from cameras and mikes hereafter. No need degrade himself in the hype machine for network ratings.
 

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...On the Sullenberger thing, haven't we heard just about enough? Sure, it was a remarkable event, and he deserves credit for bringing the plane and passengers in safely, but it really has no broader implications for our understanding of the world, our society, or life in general. Just another brand of celebrity gossip.
I disagree with the above-italicized. For the vast majority of people who have not been in a group situation hazarding disaster and likely death, the way all these people behaved presents an important understanding of what usually happens in moments like a plane crashing. Unlike the movie versions where everyone panics, shoots others and generally acts in a way designed to get the maximum bang out of screen time, in reality most people are relatively calm, helpful and very undramatic. Some people panic but most seem not to. Reality makes for bad movies in this sense but hearing about what went on is a great thing for people to know and for a greater understanding of what makes people tick and what they do in times of extreme stress.

In the movies, the heroes are obvious and few. In times of common disaster many heroes are made in the moment and often aren't bare-chested or wearing latex body suits. I think it's important sometimes for stuff like this to be remembered if not celebrated.
 

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Sully was able to do what he did because of years of training and experience that went way beyond that of most commercial pilots and an ability to stay calm under pressure. When a person who has done what is necessary to be prepared is able to use their training to save hundreds of lives they deserve to be treated as a hero. It's nice to see a real hero in the news for a change.

That said, I haven't been overexposed because I avoid TV & radio news and only read the Wall Street Journal. If you feel he's being overexposed you may be right, but if you'd stop paying attention to the crap that is presented in lieu of news the problem would be solved.
 

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Sully was able to do what he did because of years of training and experience that went way beyond that of most commercial pilots and an ability to stay calm under pressure. When a person who has done what is necessary to be prepared is able to use their training to save hundreds of lives they deserve to be treated as a hero. It's nice to see a real hero in the news for a change.

That said, I haven't been overexposed because I avoid TV & radio news and only read the Wall Street Journal. If you feel he's being overexposed you may be right, but if you'd stop paying attention to the crap that is presented in lieu of news the problem would be solved.
I wasnt worried about you being over-exposed, its the good Captain I'm concerned for.
 

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Someone in CBS got their wires crossed, or they never had wires to begin with.

Katie was great eye candy for middle aged men when she was bubbling around on morning "news". However, morning "news" is about as close to journalism as SPAM is to filet mignon. She never should have transitioned to anything other than fluffy pre-edited stories on news shows.
 

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Unfortunatly the good Captain risks over-exposure at this point. Interveiws by the insipid Couric and Gibson, having to dredge for profundities to reply with, edited here and there to insert interveiwers facial expression after answer that wasnt to the question, aaaggghhhh!!.

Re-union of crew and passengers and breif unedited interveiw with AP pool, great, but we dont need more than that.

The Capt is no doubt a humble man who may have some post-traumatic stress to deal with (though not neary as much some passengers and the stew from the back), I would hate for him to have to also come crashing down from his 15 minutes of fame.

NY magazine dubbed him the "Last Aviatior" as if to imply that they dont make em like him anymore. I would submit that we have many such hereos amongst us, they just may never get a chance to demonstrate such. They are born and bred in parts of the country that NY media types refer to as flyover country or red states, maybe the outer boros, begin their adult lives in the US Military or municipal uniformed services, may be educated, if at all, at the service academies or colleges on no NY media types kid's A list, and opt for less than glamourous or highly renumerative careers that nonetheless make a difference, and occasionally may requires them to perform highly skilled or heroic feats under less than ideal circumstances. When one does though, pampered media types seem to have far more need to mince and fawn over them than those of us not so out of touch with our fellow Americans.

I would love to buy Capt Sully a beer, but I wish he would stay away from cameras and mikes hereafter. No need degrade himself in the hype machine for network ratings.
Great points. I agree (for what its worth).
 

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On the Sullenberger thing, haven't we heard just about enough? Sure, it was a remarkable event, and he deserves credit for bringing the plane and passengers in safely, but it really has no broader implications for our understanding of the world, our society, or life in general. Just another brand of celebrity gossip.

It's a form of anxiety-management through a fantasy narrative.

The plane is the United States of America. Sully is the mythical hero with super-human abilities who miraculously saves us from disaster. He is the benevolent-though-distant father-figure, calm and capable, protecting his helpless children.

In this case, the pilot genuinely saved everyone's lives with his experience and skill. Fine. The problem is the use of this event as a metaphor. It becomes a kind of mythology when extended to other areas, such as government, for example. When people interpret events through the lens of a false mythology, they fail to see reality, even when it is BLARING at them like a siren. Instead, all they see is the fantasy.

Which leads to problems.
Spot on!

As for Katie, I would!
 
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