Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
With a little motivation I could rip it from your chest.

Is it possible?
But that's not what you mean, is it? I've asked for this to be done because I prefer shirts sans pocket. The response has always been no, not without leaving an imprint of the pocket behind but I'm sure there is a tailor or two in the forum who could answer better than I.

noble
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,387 Posts
I've done this successfully on several shirts, just be VERY careful when removing the stitching and you have to do it before washing/wearing the shirt too many times.
You may have some luck if the shirt is from "must iron" material. Non iron shirts will most definitely leave a "pocket mark".
+2 Both of you are absolutely correct. The trick to this is:

1) The shirt cannot be a non-iron shirt - like hreljan said it will leave a mark. Always.
2) I'll go one step further than dfloyd and say do it before you EVER wash the shirt.
3) You will get your best results with coarser, looser-weave shirtings like oxford cloth or a herringbone. I've yet to try this with a poplin but I'd be slightly more hesitant.

I'd get your drycleaner to do this. The seamstress will have more experience with a seam-ripper than you do and if something does happen, its their fault. My cleaners only charges $5 - well worth it IMO.

I've done this with several OCBDs and a few nicer dress shirts with beautiful results. I simply wear the shirt one time straight from the store and leave instructions with the cleaner to remove the pocket before the first cleaning, accomplishing both in one trip. Shirts look SO much better sans pocket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
My Experience with Pocketectomies

I have removed pockets from over 100 shirts successfully, with only one spectacular failure. I know this because I save the pockets as a possible source of repair material for the shirt in question, and the shoebox I just counted out has 111 pockets in it.

Recommendations:

1, Remove the pocket before washing, as other posts have mentioned. Oddly, I have gotten away with a delay a couple of times if the shirt was a poly-cotton blend.

2. Remove stitches from the pocket side, not the shirt body side, so any damage is done to the pocket fabric.

3. Take greatest care at the pocket corners, where two lines of stitching meet and the stitches form a "knot." My one failure was a chambray in which the stitching was so tight that removing it accidentally pulled a warp thread out, leaving me with a line across the chest. I can't bear to throw it away, but I have never worn it publicly.

4. Good light helps: thread generally has a different appearance than fabric, even at the single stitch level.

5. My shirts are darted and altered by a dressmaker. In my experience, dressmakers have experience with delicate fabrics, tight fits, and small dimensions of alteration-- all attributes of shirt alterations. She uses a hummingbird scissors (needle-like blades) to pull and snip each stitch.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top