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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read that allot of the members here wax their footwear once a week. I, on the other hand, do not. I take proper care of my shoes but personally don't see the need to wax once a week. The leather is in excellent condition and I generally don't wear my nicer shoes out when the weather is poor so they don't see the elements (meaning rain, I live in Georgia). I'm very easy on my shoes. They get pampered.

What are your thoughts?
Can shoes be waxed too often?

BTW - I generally alternate meltonian and kiwi:icon_smile:
 

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Yes -No

I've read that allot of the members here wax their footwear once a week. I, on the other hand, do not. I take proper care of my shoes but personally don't see the need to wax once a week. The leather is in excellent condition and I generally don't wear my nicer shoes out when the weather is poor so they don't see the elements (meaning rain, I live in Georgia). I'm very easy on my shoes. They get pampered.

What are your thoughts?
Can shoes be waxed too often?

BTW - I generally alternate meltonian and kiwi:icon_smile:
You can overwax and the wax will build up. However, I feel it is better to wax too often than not enough. If you get wax build up, you then use a solvent to remove it and start again. Since you also live in Atlanta, Bennie's sells a product called Afta which is perfect. It is also good for removing spots on clothes when you don't want to over clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks

You can overwax and the wax will build up. However, I feel it is better to wax too often than not enough. If you get wax build up, you then use a solvent to remove it and start again. Since you also live in Atlanta, Bennie's sells a product called Afta which is perfect. It is also good for removing spots on clothes when you don't want to over clean.
Thanks for the tip!:icon_smile:
I'm always hesitant to attempt to remove excess wax.
I had a bad experience using saddle soap on a pair of Alden's. It turned out ok but terrified me!
I was just using the wrong product and too much elbow grease.
I thought I had ruined the shoes.
 

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I brush when ever the shoes go on and again when they come off. Having a total of 15 pairs of shoes it takes a few days to do them all. My system is as follows: first a cream for the leather, let dry brush then apply a very thin coat of wax, let dry then brush vigorously. It works for me.
 

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JayJay brings up something that hasn't been brought up so far. It depends on the leather. If it is cordovan or binder polish, then yes, one isn't supposed to polish the shoes. I'm not sure what the instructions are for alligator or crocodile. For regular leather, as in calf leather, I have limited my polishing to twice a season. I have enough shoes so the shine stays for a little over a month.
 

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With the exception of the leathers that JayJay & Scoundrel mentioned I would find it very difficult to overwax a shoe. If you are brushing/buffing enough then the layers of wax will be incredibly thin. Don't put so much polish on that it looks like cottage-cheese. :eek: I have never had to remove wax from shoes.
 

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I've read that allot of the members here wax their footwear once a week. I, on the other hand, do not. I take proper care of my shoes but personally don't see the need to wax once a week. The leather is in excellent condition and I generally don't wear my nicer shoes out when the weather is poor so they don't see the elements (meaning rain, I live in Georgia). I'm very easy on my shoes. They get pampered.

What are your thoughts?
Can shoes be waxed too often?

BTW - I generally alternate meltonian and kiwi:icon_smile:
I abandoned wax about 20 years ago, after using it for about 30 years. I prefer a luster to high gloss, and use saddle soap and a good shoe creme to achieve it. Wax inevitably leads to wax build up, which requires it be stripped off. Even with regular, often daily, care my footwear would wind up with patches and chunks of wax over time and become unsightly. I came to believe that the process of wax build up and stripping does more harm to the leather than the regime I now use. I've read a few expert sources that concur and many that don't. But I'm very pleased with the results and find that the leather stays almost new looking almost indefinitely when compared to when I used wax.

Less work, better results.
 

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I abandoned wax about 20 years ago, after using it for about 30 years. I prefer a luster to high gloss, and use saddle soap and a good shoe creme to achieve it. Wax inevitably leads to wax build up, which requires it be stripped off. Even with regular, often daily, care my footwear would wind up with patches and chunks of wax over time and become unsightly. I came to believe that the process of wax build up and stripping does more harm to the leather than the regime I now use. I've read a few expert sources that concur and many that don't. But I'm very pleased with the results and find that the leather stays almost new looking almost indefinitely when compared to when I used wax.

Less work, better results.
What products do you use? Just curious. I'm a regular Meltonian user.
 

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What products do you use? Just curious. I'm a regular Meltonian user.
A tin of Meltonian saddle soap purchased at Arthur's in Morrisville Vermont. (This suggests it may be an antique!) and what's left of jars of Properts English Shoe Creme, which I fear is no longer available.

I had purchased a tin of Kiwi saddle soap previously which was useless junk that I threw away.
 

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I only polish my shoes as needed, which is maybe twice a year. I've just done a little experiment: The EGs I'm wearing today looked a bit dull, so I buffed them up with a tissue. This renewed the shine a bit and the tissue came away with a surprising amount of black wax on it. It's been at least half a year since I last polished them, which suggests to me that it is indeed possible to overwax shoes, or at least under-buff.
 

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I have a hunch this is an age thing. Younger men tend to wax their shoes less often than older men.

When I was a child I remember a survey was done ( think by Blue Peter _ kids TV programme) on how often people polish their shoes. Horror was expressed that people were polishing less often - like once a week only or once a month even! The man who cared for his shoes polished them every time he wore his shoes.

I polish my shoes after each and every wearing and always have done. I have it on pretty good authority that Prince Charles Valet does the same thing!
 

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...I buffed them up with a tissue. This renewed the shine a bit...
The fact that the shine was only renewed 'a bit' tells you that there was not sufficient polish on all of the leather to buff up to a good shine. I personally apply more polish when a buffing will not produce the required depth of luster. And we shouldn't forget that creams and polishes also contain color to cover scratches and scuffs. More polish needs to be applied when a buffing will not cover wear marks. Black shoes seems to require more frequent polishings than browns, tans and burgundies. Without a layer of polish on the leather, black shoes look grayish.
 

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I only polish my shoes as needed, which is maybe twice a year. I've just done a little experiment: The EGs I'm wearing today looked a bit dull, so I buffed them up with a tissue. This renewed the shine a bit and the tissue came away with a surprising amount of black wax on it. It's been at least half a year since I last polished them, which suggests to me that it is indeed possible to overwax shoes, or at least under-buff.
The fact that the shine was only renewed 'a bit' tells you that there was not sufficient polish on all of the leather to buff up to a good shine. I personally apply more polish when a buffing will not produce the required depth of luster. And we shouldn't forget that creams and polishes also contain color to cover scratches and scuffs. More polish needs to be applied when a buffing will not cover wear marks. Black shoes seems to require more frequent polishings than browns, tans and burgundies. Without a layer of polish on the leather, black shoes look grayish.
The point is, without adding any additional polish, the tissue refreshed the shine and removed excess wax. Achieving only a slight shine may have been due to the texture of the tissue. He did increase the shine though, whether through cleaning of road grime or redistribution of existing wax. If it were a sparingly waxed and well buffed shoe there would not have been any wax for the tissue to remove (through light buffing).
 

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^While I polish my shoes on a fairly regular but, as needed basis (it takes me about two and a half months to work fully through the rotation!), I've found the most effective buffing cloth to be an old pair of nylons. ;)
 

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I've read that allot of the members here wax their footwear once a week. I, on the other hand, do not. I take proper care of my shoes but personally don't see the need to wax once a week. The leather is in excellent condition and I generally don't wear my nicer shoes out when the weather is poor so they don't see the elements (meaning rain, I live in Georgia). I'm very easy on my shoes. They get pampered.

What are your thoughts?
Can shoes be waxed too often?

BTW - I generally alternate meltonian and kiwi:icon_smile:
I lol'd when I read this section.. Don't worry, it will rain again someday.. ;)
 

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^While I polish my shoes on a fairly regular but, as needed basis (it takes me about two and a half months to work fully through the rotation!), I've found the most effective buffing cloth to be an old pair of nylons. ;)
+1 They are an excellent tool for removing excess wax/polish. The higher friction causes the wax to melt and flow much quicker making for a faster shine with less work and less wax/polish build-up.
 
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