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I'm tall and thin. Combining proper chest size, sleeve length and body length on any off-the-rack garment is a challenge. Sometimes, where available, a "long" size does it; sometimes not. I've mostly resorted to custom tailored (bespoke) shirts and clothing.

In purchasing a Barbour Border coat, I had to go a larger size than I would otherwise wear to get the shoulders and sleeve length right.

This leaves me, though, with way too much coat in the body, particularly at the waist.

Does anyone on the forum have experience with altering Barbour coats -- having them tailored? i.e., Can it be done? With a skilled tailor on the case, can you get a good result?

Thanks for your guidance on this.
 

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You can probably do anything you want in tailoring, there's often a way around most problems.

The foremost problem though is with Barbours' rules, if you alter or amend any of their coats the factory will not accept them for refurbisment (mainly re-waxing) if you should want to use their service in a few years time.

I had a coat rejected because I had put patches on the elbows when the material became torn and thin, they take no prisoners.

F.
 

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I was also told "no". The issue concerned the lack of a central seam in the back of my Beaufort; material would have to be removed from the sides, where there is a lot going on (game pockets in rear, close to bellows pockets in front.
 

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I have the same issue (6' 3", 41 long, 36" arms) and have never bought a Barbour as a result.

You can order custom stuff through Filson and they also have some of their coats that you can order long and extra long.



I like their cover cloth weekender as a Border analog for $255.00:



Note: I have not bought one of these, but this is the route I'd go. I also like the Filson for these coats and most of their outerwear being made in USA and their lifetime guarantee.
 

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It may be worth asking Barbour UK as they will 'adjust' certain parts at the factory. The wax coats do tend to be shorter in the arms than their Field coats.

I returned my Beaufort to the factory several years ago for reproofing and had some binding on the cuffs - it may be possible to have the cuffs extended by pieceing in the material as the company will patch up ripped coats. You can only ask.
 

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from the Barbour website. The first Q&A; I assume alterations refers to sleeves and perhaps length.
 

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If it's not just a fashion thing, but for real use.

Aren't barbour jackets supposed to a big so that can be worn over tweed jackets?
This is a great point that evaded me when I read the original post, even if not used for tweed jackets, I always thought it a better idea to have spare room under outdoor coats such as these, if only to accomodate other layers under the coat, roll neck jumpers as well as jackets.

The Border is a lightweight coat, not much more than a shell really, forget the synthetic liner sweat creating option.

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I have a similar question about Barbour sizing. I know that the Heritage range is quite generous in size, in fact a whole size larger than "normal" for me. Though, I would like to know how the Contemporary range is in sizing. More specifically, I'm into buying the new Contemporary Leightweight Liddesdale jacket, and I'm not sure what size to choose. Since I'm 5'10 and rather thin built, thinner than the average, I usually go for size Small (or 34-36) normally, and X-Small (30-32) in Barbour classic (like the Beaufort jacket). Also, as the youngster I am, I prefer fitted style garments.

Do you have any recommendation for me? Thanks.
 

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I have the same issue (6' 3", 41 long, 36" arms) and have never bought a Barbour as a result.

You can order custom stuff through Filson and they also have some of their coats that you can order long and extra long.

I like their cover cloth weekender as a Border analog for $255.00:

Note: I have not bought one of these, but this is the route I'd go. I also like the Filson for these coats and most of their outerwear being made in USA and their lifetime guarantee.
I don't understand these "oil finish" coats. Filson says, "Entire coat lined with 4 oz. cotton to prevent Oil Finish Cover Cloth from staining your clothes." Okay...so the manufacturer states that the finish will stain other clothing...which in turn means you can't safely store these things next to other garments. You also can't throw them over your shoulder, and you can't sit down in them and lean back against any sort of fabric that you wouldn't want to stain. Seems like that all adds up to this Filson coat being an outdoorsy thing only. Right? And the coat should probably be stored in its own hanging canvas bag.
 

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Barbour jackets can be tailored. It won't be cheap and 99% of your local tailors won't touch the work (from my NYC experiences).

You have to go to either someone who has worked on Barbour Jackets before and KNOW WHAT THEY ARE DOING.

Or you can take the chance with someone who has never seen a Barbour coat before and are willing to try because they "don't see why not".

Both situations will likely cost you anywhere between $50 and $100+ in work.

I won't recommend that you try to budget this since a crappy $50 job will cost you a $379/$399 jacket if done poorly. So go to the best tailor you can find with in your budget. Also one that will not try to rip you off since having a Barbour coat may mean to them you are a walking pay day (recalls to mind my first BMW oil change experience years ago when the oil change guy wanted $200 more than my girl friend's Honda Accord because the BMW was an Imported Car. I refused saying the Accord was also imported and my car being a BMW used the same laws of physics to operate. It wasn't some magical unicorn that required extraterrestrial attention.)


Like the Beaufort the Bedale Jackets can be tailored or rather would be easier to tailor. They have riding vent flaps and armpit vent holes adjacent to the flank seams. So you can't really tackle a width issue there unless you want to delete those features (or have them oddly shifted about).

I have seen a few used tailored Bedale Jackets on eBay and auctions where the center spine (collar to hem) had a new seam reflecting that the jacket was taken in there. This looked quite good BUT the side effect was in interior labels were deleted for the tailoring. As shown below the Bedale's interior labels are in the center.

The other type of tailoring was two hem lines (also collar to hem) opposite the spine about 10 inches apart. This also looked good and the interior lining labels were spared BUT the riding vent flaps were pulled in towards the center and looked awfully narrow and odd.

I think the creation of a new center back hem on a Bedale and Beaufort can be done to look decent (you most likely can't take more than 3 inches off before it looks odd) but you need to make sure the tailor respects the location of the inside center brand labels and don't toss them out or puts them back in place when done with the work. Also for the Beaufort the game pocket will have to be properly tackled.

The sleeves can't be made longer but you can shorten them (this I've seen done many times).
Also keep in mind that Barbour jackets tend to stretch out after the first few weeks of wear. The raglan sleeves tend to stretch out an inch or more with wear.

I was also told "no". The issue concerned the lack of a central seam in the back of my Beaufort; material would have to be removed from the sides, where there is a lot going on (game pockets in rear, close to bellows pockets in front.
From 2009 to Winter 2014 it pains me to Barbour now makes 100 contemporary jackets and products for every one Bedale or Beaufort or Border jacket they make a season. Most of this contemporary jackets are factory made in E.Europe, India, Asia. As a result the new jacket lack the original hand made tailored quality.

But yeah you can find slimmer cuts in something like a Bedale SL or a Dept. B jacket. These will cost you more money than the originals though as they can easily cost above $500.

Have you tried their contemporary line / slim-cut jackets? Every season they add new slim models or adapt the old ones.

e.g the
Contemporary Beaufort
The Barbour wax never stained my clothes and I've worn 'out' dozens of Bedales and Beauforts since 1998. In fact the wax finish has greatly improved in the last years with the Sylkoil process that they use which makes the wax finish more durable for daily wear requiring less treatment and maintenance than the older wax coats.

I don't understand these "oil finish" coats. Filson says, "Entire coat lined with 4 oz. cotton to prevent Oil Finish Cover Cloth from staining your clothes." Okay...so the manufacturer states that the finish will stain other clothing...which in turn means you can't safely store these things next to other garments. You also can't throw them over your shoulder, and you can't sit down in them and lean back against any sort of fabric that you wouldn't want to stain. Seems like that all adds up to this Filson coat being an outdoorsy thing only. Right? And the coat should probably be stored in its own hanging canvas bag.
 

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Found the picture of the Classic Bedale Jacket that was tailored in the back with three new seams down the back. From the pictures below you can see the difficulties the Tailor encountered to get the width narrowed.

The result is the inner lining is cinched in around the interior labels and the Bedale vent flaps are pulled in to the center spine and looks off. With respect to the Tailor I think this job could have been much better but it also could have been much worse.
 

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Its like an actress has unnecessary plastic surgery and wakes up with tiny scar lines that never go away.
 

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Barbour jackets can be tailored. It won't be cheap and 99% of your local tailors won't touch the work (from my NYC experiences).

You have to go to either someone who has worked on Barbour Jackets before and KNOW WHAT THEY ARE DOING.

Or you can take the chance with someone who has never seen a Barbour coat before and are willing to try because they "don't see why not".

Both situations will likely cost you anywhere between $50 and $100+ in work.

I won't recommend that you try to budget this since a crappy $50 job will cost you a $379/$399 jacket if done poorly. So go to the best tailor you can find with in your budget. Also one that will not try to rip you off since having a Barbour coat may mean to them you are a walking pay day (recalls to mind my first BMW oil change experience years ago when the oil change guy wanted $200 more than my girl friend's Honda Accord because the BMW was an Imported Car. I refused saying the Accord was also imported and my car being a BMW used the same laws of physics to operate. It wasn't some magical unicorn that required extraterrestrial attention.)


Like the Beaufort the Bedale Jackets can be tailored or rather would be easier to tailor. They have riding vent flaps and armpit vent holes adjacent to the flank seams. So you can't really tackle a width issue there unless you want to delete those features (or have them oddly shifted about).

I have seen a few used tailored Bedale Jackets on eBay and auctions where the center spine (collar to hem) had a new seam reflecting that the jacket was taken in there. This looked quite good BUT the side effect was in interior labels were deleted for the tailoring. As shown below the Bedale's interior labels are in the center.

The other type of tailoring was two hem lines (also collar to hem) opposite the spine about 10 inches apart. This also looked good and the interior lining labels were spared BUT the riding vent flaps were pulled in towards the center and looked awfully narrow and odd.

I think the creation of a new center back hem on a Bedale and Beaufort can be done to look decent (you most likely can't take more than 3 inches off before it looks odd) but you need to make sure the tailor respects the location of the inside center brand labels and don't toss them out or puts them back in place when done with the work. Also for the Beaufort the game pocket will have to be properly tackled.

The sleeves can't be made longer but you can shorten them (this I've seen done many times).
Also keep in mind that Barbour jackets tend to stretch out after the first few weeks of wear. The raglan sleeves tend to stretch out an inch or more with wear.

From 2009 to Winter 2014 it pains me to Barbour now makes 100 contemporary jackets and products for every one Bedale or Beaufort or Border jacket they make a season. Most of this contemporary jackets are factory made in E.Europe, India, Asia. As a result the new jacket lack the original hand made tailored quality.

But yeah you can find slimmer cuts in something like a Bedale SL or a Dept. B jacket. These will cost you more money than the originals though as they can easily cost above $500.

The Barbour wax never stained my clothes and I've worn 'out' dozens of Bedales and Beauforts since 1998. In fact the wax finish has greatly improved in the last years with the Sylkoil process that they use which makes the wax finish more durable for daily wear requiring less treatment and maintenance than the older wax coats.
It was my understanding that Sylkoil is in fact an oil and not a wax like the Thornproof wax. Is this correct? Thanks in advance ...
 
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