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Hi All,

I am going to get 2 or so new suits from Brooks for fall from their MTM program...the one where you choose the fabric, size, and style of your suit and then it is manufactured.

For someone who is a solid, muscular, burly 5'11" 260---50 chest, 38 waist-- what are more flattering? Side vents? No vents?

I tend towards "traditional" style and am not so inclined towards no vents, although they don't look bad and I am not opposed to them.

Thanks for the input.

Best,

Hunter
 

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Hi All,

I am going to get 2 or so new suits from Brooks for fall from their MTM program...the one where you choose the fabric, size, and style of your suit and then it is manufactured.

For someone who is a solid, muscular, burly 5'11" 260---50 chest, 38 waist-- what are more flattering? Side vents? No vents?

I tend towards "traditional" style and am not so inclined towards no vents, although they don't look bad and I am not opposed to them.

Thanks for the input.

Best,
Either should look good on you. Side vents are a bit more formal and generally appealing, though I also like center vents on odd jackets and more casual suits. If you intend these suits for business or other more formal settings, I'd get side vents.
 

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I've been reading here for awhile. Not real long. I read a lot of posts on vents. Never heard side-vents described as more formal before. That can't be true can it? I have read posts where people put down the idea of side-vented dinner jackets, so they can't be that formal right?
 

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I've been reading here for awhile. Not real long. I read a lot of posts on vents. Never heard side-vents described as more formal before. That can't be true can it? I have read posts where people put down the idea of side-vented dinner jackets, so they can't be that formal right?
Dinner jackets should have no vents.

I can understand why my use of the term formal might be confusing, in my attempt to evoke the connotations of the term to describe a more polished appearance, rather than the denotation that describes very specific modes of dress for special occasions.

I don't like the term dressy, though I used it, and other terms such as casual and relaxed can be even more nebulous and ambiguous. Hence, my attempt to employ the term formal to convey a polished appearance.
 

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Side vents are more formal than center vents. But ventless is the most formal of all. I like side vents because they help the drape of the suit better than no vent. When properly fitted, side vents really don't have any disadvantages unless you prefer the clean look of no vents. I hate center vents as they make me look like I have a tail.:eek:
 

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Side vents are more formal than center vents. But ventless is the most formal of all. I like side vents because they help the drape of the suit better than no vent. When properly fitted, side vents really don't have any disadvantages unless you prefer the clean look of no vents. I hate center vents as they make me look like I have a tail.:eek:
There can be quite a bit of nuance with side vents. The much discussed Mad Men has Roger Sterling sometimes wearing side vents, and they look about 3 or 4 inches long which is accurate for the era. When I had a gentleman who did CMT for me, he normally did 9 inches. Didn't like it on me. Proportion didn't seem to work. Asked him to do 7. Ahhh . . . . perfection.
 

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I have all my suits made at Brooks and my style is very conservative and traditional. I have 58 inch chest and I have 40 waist. I opt for no vents on all my suits, per the recommendations of both the master tailor here in Boston and Martin Greenfield who made a few of my suits as well. I like the look, but then I tend to prefer more formal. If you absolutely wanted vents I would go with side vents.
 

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I generally hate no vents and can only tolerate center vents on jackets, but yesterady I was at my tailor and a tall and burly gentleman walked in and tried on a grey db suit with out vents, and it looked great. Not for me mind you, but I remember thinking, "Huh, ventless doesn't look so bad"...then again, it was a bespoke suit he was wearing.
 

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IMO, the fit of the seat in a jacket tends to be overlooked. People talk about altering the fit of a trouser seat, but never the jacket. When someone has a large seat, they're told to wear a ventless jacket because vents won't stay closed. But these people look horrible in OTR ventless jackets because the seat is too tight. Any style vent can work for anybody type as long as it fits right. Any style can work for anyone. It's the fit that needs to be right for each person.
 

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Why do you believe that?
I think it's a function of the "simpler is more formal" rule of thumb: e.g., a plain-cap oxford is more formal than a punch cap oxford b/c simpler. An unpunched black whole-cut, I suppose, could by this logic be called the "formal-est" shoe of all (leaving aside the question of formal pumps).

My understanding is that a really proper DJ has no vents and no flaps on the pockets. This makes it simpler (and sleeker) than an ordinary suitcoat, and hence a notch above it in formality. Something like this logic also explains why the trousers of a morning suit (formal daywear) are always worn plain-bottomed rather than cuffed.

That said, in the real world I don't go around at black-tie events checking people's coats for vents and I don't really care how many or few vents a man has on his DJ, but as this is an MB devoted to sartorial fine points, I thought I'd throw that out there.

As for an MTM suit, my sense is that twin vents have a more "sartorial" air. They're a bit rarer and say "sophisticated dresser" a bit more. That said, center vents and no vents are fine as well.

I'm a fairly solidly built individual as well (5'10", 225, 49 chest), so from my own experience I'd say that the keys for me in suitwear have been dark colors and lots of solids and very traditional stripes. I have two suits with "plaid" patterns, but they're extremely subtle windowpane overchecks on dark blue that you have to be standing right next to me even to see. Other than that, I stay well away from light-colored suitings and anything with horizontality to its pattern--I'm broad enough as is, and don't need any optical promotion of that effect added by my clothing.
 
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