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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I'm new to the forum, and hoping for some advice about dealing with a deep scuff (about as thin as the side of a dime but down to the "raw" leather and just long enough to be visible to an observant eye) on the cap-toe of a pair of Merlot AE Park Ave.

I read that shoe creme has greater dye content and is therefore good at refurbishing this kind of damage. I've tried using the manufacturer's polish, and it's not proven up to the task. AE does, however, have a Burgundy shoe creme. Would this help? Could I use it for a base layer and then add on the Merlot polish, or should I just send the shoes on to a repair shop?

Thanks in advance for your help.
 

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Hello all,

I'm new to the forum, and hoping for some advice about dealing with a deep scuff (about as thin as the side of a dime but down to the "raw" leather and just long enough to be visible to an observant eye) on the cap-toe of a pair of Merlot AE Park Ave.

I read that shoe creme has greater dye content and is therefore good at refurbishing this kind of damage. I've tried using the manufacturer's polish, and it's not proven up to the task. AE does, however, have a Burgundy shoe creme. Would this help? Could I use it for a base layer and then add on the Merlot polish, or should I just send the shoes on to a repair shop?

Thanks in advance for your help.
I'm assuming that when you refer to "manufacturer's polish", you're talking about AE paste wax. The only AE brand shoe creme with which I'm familiar comes in a tube. It also appears to contain wax. I'd find a shoe creme of a suitable shade that does not. Meltonian has worked well, and Andy has also recommended a brand I believe is named Tarago, though I haven't used it myself.

I would start by cleaning all the wax from on and around the scratch. I use Meltonian saddle soap on my shoes. I would then get a box of Q-tips. Saturate the end of the Q-tip in the shoe creme, but a glob isn't needed. Rub it into the scratch until the raw leather absorbs the shoe creme and its dye. Let it dry about 5 minutes, buff it out with a horsehair brush and repeat a few more times. I prefer not to use paste wax, but evidently you do. In this instance the paste wax will help fill in the gouge. Apply a thin layer of paste wax using your fingertips (Yup!) and buff out first with a horsehair brush, and then a shine rag. This will be about as good as it's going to get.
 

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"Danger, danger, Will Robinson!"

Take it to a shoe repairman for advice and/or a fix. If it's as bad as it sounds, and I don't think you'd be asking advice here if it were not, professional care is the best way to go. If you use burgundy on merlot, my guess is that would create an indelible dark line or smudge of different color than the rest of the shoe.

Remember, you're dealing with raw leather. It absorbs dye like a sponge, and there may be some things the professional shoe man can apply that will deal with that situation, whereas using something suitable for top dressing may not work as well.
 

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What is the difference between "burgundy" and "merlot" as far as shoe colors go? Negligible to none, I should think. Given that A-E merlot shoes themselves can differ quite a bit from pair to pair as to color, I doubt that there would be the slightest harm in applying a burgundy cream to A-Es in merlot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What is the difference between "burgundy" and "merlot" as far as shoe colors go? Negligible to none, I should think. Given that A-E merlot shoes themselves can differ quite a bit from pair to pair as to color, I doubt that there would be the slightest harm in applying a burgundy cream to A-Es in merlot.
This was my thinking, too. But after doing a bit of research, I get the impression that the burgundy is a lighter shade or "reddish brown." Does anyone perhaps have shoes in both colors from AE?

I admit, one thing I haven't done is compare the two colors somehow by finding pairs of shoes in both on the AE website.
 

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This was my thinking, too. But after doing a bit of research, I get the impression that the burgundy is a lighter shade or "reddish brown." Does anyone perhaps have shoes in both colors from AE?

I admit, one thing I haven't done is compare the two colors somehow by finding pairs of shoes in both on the AE website.
While I entirely understand your desire to return your beautiful new shoes to being beautiful new shoes, consider that as you wear them, no pair of shoes will continue to look new, though they can remain beautiful if well cared for. Indeed, the minor nicks, scuffs and scrapes well attended to only add to the appeal of a good pair of shoes. I'd be very surprised if the scratch your shoes experienced isn't most noticable to you, and will remain so. I concur with JLibourel that attempting to find an exact match of color is not nearly as critical as it may seem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
While I entirely understand your desire to return your beautiful new shoes to being beautiful new shoes, consider that as you wear them, no pair of shoes will continue to look new, though they can remain beautiful if well cared for. Indeed, the minor nicks, scuffs and scrapes well attended to only add to the appeal of a good pair of shoes. I'd be very surprised if the scratch your shoes experienced isn't most noticable to you, and will remain so. I concur with JLibourel that attempting to find an exact match of color is not nearly as critical as it may seem.
I agree with regards to quality leather taking on "character." Nonetheless, what I wouldn't want is for the shoes to lose, well, the merlot color. FWIW, I did in fact check the AE website and compare a pair of the McNeil in burgundy and the McClain in merlot. Two things: the merlot is in fact (to my eye at least) the lighter of the two colors, and the difference is significant enough to give me pause.

What I think I'm going to do is apply the merlot AE shoe polish I have, as suggested earlier (with a finger or q-tip), and see if I can "fill" the scuff while waiting for the "character" to ease its way in.
 

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I agree with regards to quality leather taking on "character." Nonetheless, what I wouldn't want is for the shoes to lose, well, the merlot color. FWIW, I did in fact check the AE website and compare a pair of the McNeil in burgundy and the McClain in merlot. Two things: the merlot is in fact (to my eye at least) the lighter of the two colors, and the difference is significant enough to give me pause.

What I think I'm going to do is apply the merlot AE shoe polish I have, as suggested earlier (with a finger or q-tip), and see if I can "fill" the scuff while waiting for the "character" to ease its way in.
I understand your concern. Give it a try, I hope it works well, but it can always be removed if still problematic.

I found a site (one of many) for the Tarrago (double-r) shoe creme. Comes in 94 colors. Would think one should be pretty cloese to your leather. Andy also has a clickable link somewhere on the site for this product that allows a small considertation should you ever decide to purchase.

Good luck!

https://www.shoetreemarketplace.com/TARRAGO_Shoe_Cream_Jar_94_colors_available_p/1006.htm
 
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