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Just saw Darkest Hour, this afternoon, loved it. I was wondering what the local Brits thought of it?
It was well done.

I have been a resident of Multnomah county for about 24 years. I am not proud to say I live in Multnomah county.

If I had it to do over again I would have been living in Oregon City for the past 24 years.

Welcome to AAAC and best regards,
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It was well done.

I have been a resident of Multnomah county for about 24 years. I am not proud to say I live in Multnomah county.

If I had it to do over again I would have been living in Oregon City for the past 24 years.

Welcome to AAAC and best regards,
I figured NO body is going to know 'Multnomah', on this forum... My druthers would be Baker City...
 

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Oddly enough, I was visiting Heidelberg when I first became aware of this film. I toyed with the idea of watching this film about the Nazis' arch-nemesis while there (presumably dubbed or subtitled in German) - it was an attractive plan - but sadly had too little time.
Eventually I saw it when it played at my village hall, and thought Oldman did a great job, but overall the film was rather disappointing, and in parts, such as Churchill's supposed vox populi tube-journey, complete hokum and almost embarrassing to watch. Some of the background stuff, involving Chamberlain and Halifax for instance, and King George, was well done.
 

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Your mention of Heidelberg put me in mind of the manner in which the Schloss appeared, as here captured, from a sidewalk table of a Gastatte at twilight when suddenly illuminated by its flood lights. The entire gigantic pile sprung into view appearing to levitate several hundred feet in the air.

A subsequent unauthorized :oops: tour undertaken by a friend and I revealed a room not included on the guided tour; an ancient circular room with a domed ceiling with a sky light cut into it open to the air. It was full of crude wooden benches cover with glass flagons, and such, looking for all the world like a Hollywood depiction of an alchemist's chamber.

This now a half century ago.

 

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Lit in that way, the castle looks far less battered than it really is - the French have a lot to answer for. The chamber you mention sounds a bit like that described by Mary Shelley. Sadly, I had no leisure to make such a detailed investigation, though I did make the acquaintance of one gentleman from the underworld, after a night on the tiles:

Sculpture Art Wood Statue Facade
 

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Lit in that way, the castle looks far less battered than it really is - the French have a lot to answer for. The chamber you mention sounds a bit like that described by Mary Shelley. Sadly, I had no leisure to make such a detailed investigation, though I did make the acquaintance of one gentleman from the underworld, after a night on the tiles:

View attachment 20409
Fellow looks like my uncle Charlie! (Often found in similar postures!)

The French do indeed have much to answer for, not least what they did to fine old English. While the chamber described sounds spooky, viewed on a bright summer's day with sunlight flooding the space through the sky light it mainly just looked ancient. And very, very dusty!

And while Napoleon's troops did their best, I still find it an imposing and romantic sight, overlooking the Neckar. Oh! Our unauthorized tour also included peering through the iron bars set in openings at eye level, into what appeared to a place of confinement.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oddly enough, I was visiting Heidelberg when I first became aware of this film. I toyed with the idea of watching this film about the Nazis' arch-nemesis while there (presumably dubbed or subtitled in German) - it was an attractive plan - but sadly had too little time.
Eventually I saw it when it played at my village hall, and thought Oldman did a great job, but overall the film was rather disappointing, and in parts, such as Churchill's supposed vox populi tube-journey, complete hokum and almost embarrassing to watch. Some of the background stuff, involving Chamberlain and Halifax for instance, and King George, was well done.
The film maker was questioned about the ' Vox populi" scenes as you put it and stood by it. Saying it was fiction depicting a collection of real events. Im with you. One of my favorite parts was when the King becomes defiant.
 

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I was fortunate enough to visit Heidelberg in January 2013. It was a stunning town. I was on the Philosopher's Weg on my way up the hill when it started snowing. It was so quiet I could hear the snow hitting the trees.

Cheers,

BSR
Wow! Is that evocative!

The city in Germany in which I lived in the late '60's would roll up the sidewalks at 10PM, and should I leave a Gastatte late, the quiet while walking home would be enveloping. You could touch it! And as I have stood in the woods when the snow began to fall, yes, you could hear the snow among the evergreens when it first began!
 

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Having only now gotten around to viewing Darkest Hour I wish I had not bothered. Revisionist diversity claptrap.

Those who are dissatisfied with the man that Churchill was ought to consider the quality of the world that we would likely exist in now had he been other.
 

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^That's an interesting take.

Did you feel that the movie presented Churchill in an unflattering light?
Not particularly.

The introduction of irrelevant and/or fabricated (barely credible) characters was wholly unnecessary in the telling of this tale - except, of course, to promote a modern agenda.
 

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History, I suppose is not interesting enough for Hollywood. I would like to see a film depicting the White House when, while visiting,
Churchill went on an epic bender.

Churchill is one of the most human characters, and most
misunderstood, Titans of the 20th century.

His shadow is indeed long and we live in the world shaped, in part, by his vision. The fact that he came back again from his defeat in 1945 is an epic story!

One of my heroes. A flawed man but amazing in spite of his flaws.

Cheers,

BSR
 

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History, I suppose is not interesting enough for Hollywood. I would like to see a film depicting the White House when, while visiting,
Churchill went on an epic bender.

Churchill is one of the most human characters, and most
misunderstood, Titans of the 20th century.

His shadow is indeed long and we live in the world shaped, in part, by his vision. The fact that he came back again from his defeat in 1945 is an epic story!

One of my heroes. A flawed man but amazing in spite of his flaws.

Cheers,

BSR
Indeed. the real hero's are those who achieve their dreams, realizing their destinies in spite of their flaws. I can't tell you how, with increasing frequency I must look to the past for my inspiration today! :(
 
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