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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So BB has a collaboration with Fila that seems to have a tennis related vibe about it, with large and some might say garish logos.


But anyways they have a few blazers that look like rowing blazers with edge piping but which they are styling in tennis settings in some of their promos. Is their a history of tennis related blazers that look like this? Or is BB trying to rechannel rowing blazer style into a tennis setting? I'm a little confused by this, but I probably know more about rowing then tennis so maybe I missed something... what say you?

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Maybe my Maxply Fort will come back into style.

If I weren't busy watching Flower Drum Song (thanks, @Fading Fast ) I could critique it, but this is shaping up as the most surreal moment of my life.

It needs feathers and orange pajamas.
Looking forward to your thoughts on it. It's a bit of a crazy movie, but if you're in the right mood, it's goofy fun.
 

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I realize this may all be an abomination to some - many? - here. But I’m curious from a lineage perspective. Is there some tradition of tennis blazers that resemble rowing club blazers that Brooks is resurrecting or did they somehow get their wiring crossed and just make this look up out of whole cloth?
 

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Looking forward to your thoughts on it. It's a bit of a crazy movie, but if you're in the right mood, it's goofy fun.
It was a fun movie. Of course it was loaded with stereotypical western perceptions of China, but I lived in San Francisco around the time it was made, and the Chinese culture in that city was evolving quickly to try to be economically viable while preserving identity, phenomenally challenging. I used to love Grant Ave. It was sad that the film industry had to use Japanese to portray Chinese, frankly, to a degree, the same Japanese actors who often were used to portray those whom we called Indians and also grossly stereotyped. But it was a far less sensitive world, and in that context you just go with it. The TCM commentary was excellent, including credit for dealing with undocumented immigration. The music and dancing were quite mixed, but a few of the numbers were quite good. All of the character actors were real gems. On balance I enjoyed it a lot. My family lived in San Francisco pretty much from its origins and had a love for Chinese culture. It is fun to me to go back and savor snippets of it with food, decor, and manners. The respect for age and wisdom is pretty timeless, as is the headstrong folly of youth. The 300SL was a breathtaking surprise.
 

· (aka TKI67)
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I realize this may all be an abomination to some - many? - here. But I'm curious from a lineage perspective. Is there some tradition of tennis blazers that resemble rowing club blazers that Brooks is resurrecting or did they somehow get their wiring crossed and just make this look up out of whole cloth?
Sure seems made up to this observer. Matters of origin aside, the blazers are garish and pathetic. If there is anything about the whole look worthy of appreciation, it is the attempt, albeit feeble, tacky, and overpriced, to reintroduce tennis whites. If they were to reintroduce Adler white wool socks I might have to buy something from them!
 

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It was a fun movie. Of course it was loaded with stereotypical western perceptions of China, but I lived in San Francisco around the time it was made, and the Chinese culture in that city was evolving quickly to try to be economically viable while preserving identity, phenomenally challenging. I used to love Grant Ave. It was sad that the film industry had to use Japanese to portray Chinese, frankly, to a degree, the same Japanese actors who often were used to portray those whom we called Indians and also grossly stereotyped. But it was a far less sensitive world, and in that context you just go with it. The TCM commentary was excellent, including credit for dealing with undocumented immigration. The music and dancing were quite mixed, but a few of the numbers were quite good. All of the character actors were real gems. On balance I enjoyed it a lot. My family lived in San Francisco pretty much from its origins and had a love for Chinese culture. It is fun to me to go back and savor snippets of it with food, decor, and manners. The respect for age and wisdom is pretty timeless, as is the headstrong folly of youth. The 300SL was a breathtaking surprise.
Your observations are well taken, TKI. I was also reminded of the way Western actors were used to portray Eastern characters. The oddest was Nils Asther, a Swedish actor in 1930s Hollywood, portraying the Chinese warlord General Yen in The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1933). But some actors do very well, and my favourite is Sir Alec Guinness playing an Indian rabble rouser, Professor Godbole in David Lean's A Passage to India (1984) -- he did a superb job.
 
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