Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Will was gracious enough to provide us with a run down of what a basic wardrobe should look like. Thanks to Will's blueprint I plan on acquiring my basic wardrobe by the end of 09' hopefully. All of my suits will be MTM (bespoke).

https://asuitablewardrobe.blogspot.com

However, I was curious as to what a basic Shoe Wardrobe should look like and what should a medium shoe wardrobe consist of as well?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
565 Posts
Will has a post outlining his thoughts on a basic shoe wardrobe elsewhere on his blog, but IIRC it runs something along these lines:

ESSENTIALS

- two pairs of black oxford balmorals (your "go-to" shoes)
- two pairs of brown oxfords
- one pair of monks or other less formal (non-black) shoe for Fridays and weekends.

This set-up will ensure that you don't wear a single pair for two days in a row (to rest the leather). However, when a shoe is being resoled you may need to buy a sixth pair to reduce wear on your remaining pairs.

Once you have the absolute basics, you can venture into seasonal shoes (spectators for summer), suede shoes, boots, etc. as personal taste dictates.

If I've missed a key point, someone let me know.

Geoff

PS - I found the original post - here it is: https://asuitablewardrobe.dynend.com/2006/12/shoe-wardrobe.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,101 Posts
Really depends on your tastes and needs. The essential is a black balmoral captoe, for interviews and funerals and such. If your job demands it, you might need two pairs of black balmorals to rotate. If that job is in the UK, you might want even more. But for most guys, one pair is enough.

After that, the world's your oyster. If you wear suits daily, you'll probably want a selection of balmorals in brown and maybe burgundy, if your tastes are so inclined. If you don't wear suits often, you'll need fewer balmorals, unless you just want to wear them, and instead can focus on bluchers or boots or monks. As long as your shoes fit your circumstance, and as long as you can let each pair rest between wearings, you'll be fine.

I spend most of my time in boots -- chelseas, chukkas and higher laceups. I could get by with a pair of black balmorals and two brown boots, if necessary.

My suggestion is that you figure out what you need and then find the shoes you love. Many guys start out buying better-quality shoes because they thought they ought to, only to discover, a few months down the line, that they now own several expensive shoes they don't really like. You can minimize this if you'll cultivate your tastes a bit before making many high-dollar purchases. You might check out the shoe porn thread and the shoe pictorial index over at StyleForum, for example. Find what you like and then buy it -- seems so simple, no?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,689 Posts
Really depends on your tastes and needs. The essential is a black balmoral captoe, for interviews and funerals and such. If your job demands it, you might need two pairs of black balmorals to rotate. If that job is in the UK, you might want even more. But for most guys, one pair is enough.
Some people in London only wear black shoes to work, but then you have some people who only wear brown shoes.

For work, I rotate with 2 black and 2 brown shoes - in the rotation, I have wear one suit twice; with Friday as casual or smart casual (smart sneaker, buckle shoe or loafer).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
For my taste I like oxfords, bluchers, and penny loafers less tassles. It really comes down to those three I guess. I suppose I'll pick up two pairs of captoe oxfords in black, brown, and burgundy. As well as penny loafers in those same colors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
My own list is similar, but I think wingtip bals are fine with a suit in the city (provided the suit and overall ensemble aren't especially formal) but I don't like them with a blazer or sportcoat. For the essentials, I would say one of each of the following:

(For wear with suits)
Black perforated cap-toe bal
Brown or burgundy medallion cap toe (semi-brogue) bal
Black, brown or burgundy wingtip (full brogue) bal

(For wear with blazer or sport coat)
Brown or burgundy plain-toe or wingtip leather soled bluchers (derby)
Brown or burgundy loafers, penny or tassel
Brown monk straps

(For general casual wear with khakis, cords, etc., with or without a jacket)
Brown rubber-soled plain or split toe bluchers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,538 Posts
I dunno. I just can't get into tasseled loafers. They apparently began with golfing shoes that had the fold-over fringed tongue that was secured by the fit strings running around the back like a boat shoe, in turn tasseled. The ones that just have the functionless tied tasseled knot strike me as ornament gone wild.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My own list is similar, but I think wingtip bals are fine with a suit in the city (provided the suit and overall ensemble aren't especially formal) but I don't like them with a blazer or sportcoat. For the essentials, I would say one of each of the following:

(For wear with suits)
Black perforated cap-toe bal
Brown or burgundy medallion cap toe (semi-brogue) bal
Black, brown or burgundy wingtip (full brogue) bal

(For wear with blazer or sport coat)
Brown or burgundy plain-toe or wingtip leather soled bluchers (derby)
Brown or burgundy loafers, penny or tassel
Brown monk straps

(For general casual wear with khakis, cords, etc., with or without a jacket)
Brown rubber-soled plain or split toe bluchers
Ok can someone please explain to me what a full brogue, semi-brogue and a derby is?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
I just can't get into tasseled loafers. The ones that just have the functionless tied tasseled knot strike me as ornament gone wild.
Same here.

Ok can someone please explain to me what a full brogue, semi-brogue and a derby is?
Blind leading the blind, but here goes...

Brogueing is the punching that you see on these shoes:

I'm not sure where the line is drawn between semi and full-brogue, but you can probably recall shoes you have seen that had more holes punched in them than the second one.

Derby shoe, I think, is also called bluchers. The blucher is less formal than a balmoral. The difference, from what I have gathered, is in how the shoe is constructed where the laces are inserted. To me, on a blucher the part where the laces are inserted looks like it was attached to the top of the shoe where on a balmoral there seems to be a more subtle transition.
This is a blucher:
This is a balmoral:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
As English shoemakers we'd consider shoe wardrobe essentials to be: a classic loafer with hand-stitched lake and a low-rise saddle boot (blucher/derby style) for weekends/casual; a black brogued oxford boot and shoe to alternate with different trouser cuff cuts and trouser styles (forget the rule that brogues should be brown) during the working week (but possibly one brown for a continental look with a charcoal/navy suit) and a wholecut for a really sharp, evening look.

But really the list is endless - after all, you can never have too many shoes gentlemen now can you?!;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
But really the list is endless - after all, you can never have too many shoes gentlemen now can you?!;)
The longer I read and post here, the higher the upper limit seems to rise.:icon_pale:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
243 Posts
My own list....
....
(For general casual wear with khakis, cords, etc., with or without a jacket)
Brown rubber-soled plain or split toe bluchers
Hear, hear. My AE split toe bluchers with rubber sole are my essential go-to shoes here. Since most of my time is spent in arctic boots, steel-toe boots, or running shoes, those are the only "real" shoes I've worn since I moved here 6 months ago. However, I do wish I had brought one pair of leather-soled shoes to dance in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,852 Posts
IIUC, they're the British names for wingtip, medallion cap-toe and blucher, respectively.
Let's not forget the quarter-brogue, which has its brogueing (punching) only on the seam between the toecap and the rest of the upper:

https://www.brooksbrothers.com/IWCa...t_Id=728929&Parent_Id=522&default_color=Black

Brogue is from the Gaelic word for shoe, and the brogueing was originally a set of actual holes, put there to let water drain out as you were tromping across the damp moors and braes and whatnot, kind of like a modern "water" sandal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
The basic wardrobe consists of 5 pairs of shoes for a working week that are as comfortable because you're wearing them a long time.They also need to be shoes that you really like because you have to wear them.In my case this is 5 pairs of Loake Exeter brogues (or the Herring version) in different colors. You then need two or three pairs of more casual shoes for knocking about in the evening . In my case I go for Allen Edmond Lindens in chilli and black.For funerals and the like I keep a pair of Clarks captoes that I don't particularly like ( but how often do I go to funerals?) For smart affairs I keep a pair of black Cheaney brogue and a pair of tan Loake semi brogues. Bewteen them they'll take care of post color of pants. For wet days I rely on a couple of pairs of old but still servicable Maine Dexters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I think this really depends on where you work and play and what your personal tastes are. I could get by with AE Park Avenues in both black and merlot, black monk strap, cordovan monk strap, about 5 pairs of Santoni slip-ons in various colors, and dressy boots in black and cordovan.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top