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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, all,

In the cold, the scarf, as most men agree, is a useful tool. But the fact is that few of us genuinely heed the advice, though it will be admitted that each, once in his life, passed and glanced, in the Gap, at the aisle where scarves are sold; but even when, with sidelong glances we ensured that nobody watched us, we looked and dreamed of the possibilities, such as a fatuous toss, in freezing weather, over a black tee-shirt, the imminent humiliation among our friends was understood.

Lately, I have understood the Gap's plan, the hawking of these acrylic, effeminate shrouds, colored a daring navy blue, to these metrosexual types. But I want a manlier scarf, without fringes, without frills; so I am seeking a black scarf, with a squared edge, fleece (for the matching of a hooded sweatshirt) nor acrylic or wool, which are unmanly (do we remember Jason and the Golden Fleece?) Where can I purchase such a thing? What is the opinion on this forum of the Neck Gaiter and its usefulness to a non-hewoman? I will not be wearing any kind of coat with this scarf, though I do live in the middle of Canada.
 

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i also would like to hear the answer to this question. a single red wool scarf that i have doesn't have fringes but if i could, i'd probably take the rest of them to a tailor that could take the rest of them off and make them square. but, i think this may damage the scarf.
 

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Every Orthodox Jew wears a fringed prayer shawl under his clothing.

Fringe is a natural wicking devise for rain and snow. It also has the acoustic quality shared with specifid wing feathers of hunting birds to neutralise noise, the swish swish if you will.
 

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But I want a manlier scarf, without fringes, without frills; so I am seeking a black scarf, with a squared edge, fleece (for the matching of a hooded sweatshirt) nor acrylic or wool, which are unmanly
Good heavens! Only for manly men, huh? Fringes look good. Get a few nice ones in tartan of cashmere, or lambswool. Or even silk. You know, the kind the sissies used to wear who flew motorized kites held together by twine and chewing gum while shooting at each other with .50 cals without parachutes.
 

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Know what I really miss out of the whole cape, spats,black french beret and other proscribed items of wear?
Remember those really cool suede jackets with the fringe on the hem, breast pockets and sleeves from the 50s-60s?
they were a spinoff of Fess Parker's Daniel Boone/Davy Crocket gig.

And another usefull element of fringing. It makes for a passive fly whisk on hot days.

Join the fringe element NADER 2008
 

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Agreed

Huh, well, this is an in(s)ane topic, IMO. Most scarves in my experience come with fringe. Some don't. All are equally manly, or not, as the case may be. Fringe doesn't factor into it.
The fringe of a wool or cashmere or camel scarf is a terminal device to keep the fabric from unravelling. Plaids have them, and I defy you to tell a Scotsman or Irishman that he appears effeminate wearing one:mad:
 

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I you have any intention of wearing a scarf, you would do best to go whole hog. I prefer my massive double cloth, six-foot-long, Scottish wool, striped University scarf. If anyone doesn't like it, it's more than hearty enough to strangle any detractors. Failing that, scarves made by Pendleton woolen mills (https://www.pendleton-usa.com/jump.jsp?itemID=378&itemType=PRODUCT&path=1,2,5,35&iProductID=378) are plenty manly, whether you prefer the plaids, solids or native designs. If those are to girly, for you, I'd recommend you give up on neckwear all together, or consider why you have such a phobia of looking efeminate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hello, all,

I at last bought it, gentlemen. After conferring with the company (Performance Neck Gaiters), it was agreed that the thing, to be shipped by midnight post, would reach my doorstep in a box bearing no labels. I unpacked and wore it in front of the mirror. Before I walked to class the next morning,I spent much time and tested many outfits in front of the mirror. It was a long affair; I tested with it many things, such as a coat, which, I decided, was too stuffy, a sweater, which I think my grandpa used to wear or something, and even khaki pants, but it's not like I'm wearing a tuxedo or anything. At last, I decided, I didn't give a crap, you know; only losers stand in front of the mirror for this long. I donned an old green fleece, a pair o' blue jeans, a brown baseball cap (go Cleveland!), and the black neck gaiter, and fast straightened my posture, thinking for a second that I was some nineteenth century aristocrat, turning down my nose at the world. I went to the frat house in order to meet my friends, walking as though I was on top of the world. And the first thing that I heard was, 'Hey, dude, are you wearing a SCARF?' Well, that was it for me and the scarf; after that time (yesterday like 3 o'clock), as you may suspect, I have known that a scarf is not for me.

~IIC
 

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after that time (yesterday like 3 o'clock), as you may suspect, I have known that a scarf is not for me.
Where I went to school in New Hampshire the scarf was not only widely worn, but also widely considered necessary to survive the arctic winters. I think once the etiquette chair of my fraternity gave a brief presentation on ways to knot your scarf.

I grew up in the west, where almost nobody wore scarves because we were all skiers - we'd wear a parka, or something with a hood, but I never saw scarves. When I came East, that changed. Back here it seems to be much more ubiquitous.

Either way though, that you were that sensitive to wearing a particular garment suggests you are indeed not ready to wear it.
 

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Hello, all,

I at last bought it, gentlemen. After conferring with the company (Performance Neck Gaiters), it was agreed that the thing, to be shipped by midnight post, would reach my doorstep in a box bearing no labels. I unpacked and wore it in front of the mirror. Before I walked to class the next morning,I spent much time and tested many outfits in front of the mirror. It was a long affair; I tested with it many things, such as a coat, which, I decided, was too stuffy, a sweater, which I think my grandpa used to wear or something, and even khaki pants, but it's not like I'm wearing a tuxedo or anything. At last, I decided, I didn't give a crap, you know; only losers stand in front of the mirror for this long. I donned an old green fleece, a pair o' blue jeans, a brown baseball cap (go Cleveland!), and the black neck gaiter, and fast straightened my posture, thinking for a second that I was some nineteenth century aristocrat, turning down my nose at the world. I went to the frat house in order to meet my friends, walking as though I was on top of the world. And the first thing that I heard was, 'Hey, dude, are you wearing a SCARF?' Well, that was it for me and the scarf; after that time (yesterday like 3 o'clock), as you may suspect, I have known that a scarf is not for me.

~IIC
Was it not cold enough to wear the scarf? Was it warm yesterday in your 'neck-o-the-woods'? Was this a fashion accesory.
 

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SCARFOBIA USA?

Is it me, or is America the only country in the western world where thinking about the humble neck scarf can give grown men sleepless nights worrying about their manhood? I noticed this strange, unique phenomenon the moment i arrived in NY a few years back. In Europe its pretty safe to say that only if you tied a scarf round your head or knotted it jauntily around your nether parts would anyone notice you or it, still less would they call you on it. Is there anywhere else AAAC members experience or have witnessed such a deep seated irrational phobia about a strip of wool - a functional strip of wool at that? What exactly is the issue with the scarf? Ive never heard or read anyone suggest that scarves can be effeminate anywhere but here in the United States and i demand to know why....its truly fascinating. I wonder if there other garments that excite such doubts in men in other countries. The only UK one i can think of is Cowboy boots. But we don't see a lot of them of course.
 

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While I've never worn a scarf myself, I don't think I have ever thought of them in terms of where they rank on the manliness scale; however, I can say that I would rank them well above such items as opera pumps and sock garters. :icon_smile_big:

When I think of scarves, which is not very often, I can't help but think of Det. Fontana (Dennis Farina) on "Law and Order".He always seemed to be wearing a scarf with his camel topcoat.

What's interesting is that Farina was let go from this show in part because his character was not deemed as believable as the others, despite the fact that Farina was actually a Chicago police officer before he became an actor. The only member of the cast who actually had a law enforcement background was the least believable?

Cruiser
 

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Interestedinclothing lives "in the middle of Canada"... Ontario? Manitoba? It gets cold in our neck (pun intended) of the woods.

Having said that, it's not yet scarf wearing weather, unless perhaps in Sakatchewan where it snowed. It seems to be me that Interested wore his scarf without a coat, in a kind of artsy way. If that's what happened, I can relate to his colleagues' reaction.
 

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Is it me, or is America the only country in the western world where thinking about the humble neck scarf can give grown men sleepless nights worrying about their manhood? I noticed this strange, unique phenomenon the moment i arrived in NY a few years back. In Europe its pretty safe to say that only if you tied a scarf round your head or knotted it jauntily around your nether parts would anyone notice you or it, still less would they call you on it. Is there anywhere else AAAC members experience or have witnessed such a deep seated irrational phobia about a strip of wool - a functional strip of wool at that? What exactly is the issue with the scarf? Ive never heard or read anyone suggest that scarves can be effeminate anywhere but here in the United States and i demand to know why....its truly fascinating. I wonder if there other garments that excite such doubts in men in other countries. The only UK one i can think of is Cowboy boots. But we don't see a lot of them of course.
Parts of suburban North American descended into a phony machismo entailing pickup trucks, t-shirts as outer garments in winter, spoiling good beer by drinking it from bottles and apparently no scarves 15, or so, years ago from which significant portions of that population have evidently not yet recovered.
 
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