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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Braces = suspenders
Cravat = Ascot
Derbies = Bluchers
Dinner jacket = Tuxedo
Double breasted styled lapels = Peaked lapels
Overcoat/coat = coat
Lounge coat/jacket = jacket
Lounge suit = sack suit, or business suit
Morning coat = cutaway
Morning dress = morning dress
Oxford shoes/boots = Balmoral shoes/boots
Pick-and-pick (weave) = sharkskin
Step notch lapel (tailoring parlance) = Notched lapel
Trousers = pants (short for pantaloons)
Waistcoat (vest in tailoring parlance) = vest

Have I missed anything?
 

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turnups=cuffs -- is this correct?
vest=undershirt -- is this correct?
Yes.
Yes.

Isn't there also a different English term for what we in the U.S. call French cuffs?
Yes = Double cuff.

Mens' pants to us (outside of Ask Andy) are underpants.
To spice it up and be gender right - on, we call panties, nickers.

My question, we also call a jumper or sweater, a jersey, I think they also do the same in spanish.
Do you ?

F.
PS. No jokes please from emegency services members about sweaters and jumpers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Sack suit - no silhouette or shape.
If you look at Croonborg's Blue Book of Men's Tailoring (NY-Chicago, 1907) he makes it quite clear that you can cut a waisted sack coat without resorting to the additional front dart. In one case, he even shows a pattern with the added front dart for extra waist suppression, and still calls it a sack coat. Even today American's like their sack coat a bit drapier all round. Just try on a coat from Oxxford in your size or else take a look at how Manton likes his coats cut and you will see what I mean.

From that I think it is quite reasonable to say:

lounge coat = sack coat

It's kind of a pity IMHO when you lose local character and replace it will internationalised standards sometimes. I enjoy it when the Americans here talk about their "cutaway" and wish they'd revive the use of the term "sack coat" to describe all lounge coats and not just ones lacking the extra front dart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
jumper=sweater
lounge suit=suit
turnups=cuffs -- is this correct?
vest=undershirt -- is this correct?

Isn't there also a different English term for what we in the U.S. call French cuffs?
There are some good ones here. Yes, turnups (trousers) = cuffs.

Also, I forgot:

pull through = knitted vest

Obviously, you can't call it a waistcoat since the knitted version isn't a tailored garment.
 

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Don't English reserve 'dress shirt' for formal wear, while the Americans use it to mean what we wear to the office? If this is correct, what do the English call what Americans call 'dress shirt'? Also, I thought I have come across 'tailcoat' being called a 'dress suit' by some UK posters. May be wrong about that. But Americans also refer to the 'lounge suit' as 'dress suit'. In fact, Flusser uses 'dress suit' and 'dress shirt' quite frequently in Dressing the Man.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Also, I thought I have come across 'tailcoat' being called a 'dress suit' by some UK posters. May be wrong about that. But Americans also refer to the 'lounge suit' as 'dress suit'. In fact, Flusser uses 'dress suit' and 'dress shirt' quite frequently in Dressing the Man.
I think the word "dress suit" is probably being used by Flusser as an descriptive term without the two words necessarily becoming a standard phrasal unit. "Sack suit" is the really authentic all-American term for a lounge. It is unfortunately limited these days to lounges without a front dart over the side pockets, but the term was once used to describe all lounge suits. It just happens that American tailors didn't usually cut their "sack coats" with the front dart.

Yes, a "dress suit" is a traditional English tailor's term for an evening tail coat and matching trousers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hadn't heard of that before.

We do have pullover, one piece sleeveless, no zip or buttons.
For the sake of this lexicon, what is that known as in the US ?

F.
I usually think of pullover as being just another term for jumper.

I ordered a "knitted vest" from a knitter in Scotland and she always called it a "pull through".
 

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I think the word "dress suit" is probably being used by Flusser as an descriptive term without the two words necessarily becoming a standard phrasal unit. "Sack suit" is the really authentic all-American term for a lounge. It is unfortunately limited these days to lounges without a front dart over the side pockets, but the term was once used to describe all lounge suits. It just happens that American tailors didn't usually cut their "sack coats" with the front dart.

Yes, a "dress suit" is a traditional English tailor's term for an evening tail coat and matching trousers.
Thanks for the clarification:icon_smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Collar/Lapel Types

Step collar = notched lapel (note that notchED is the proper American English)

Double breasted or pointed collar = peaked lapel (again peakED not "peak")

Here is the proof:





The source is vol I of The Modern Tailor Outfitter and Clothier edited by A.A. Whife, 1951. There is something similar mentioned in the men's tailoring section. The shawl collar is also referred to as a "roll collar". W.D.F. Vincent refers to it as the "shawl roll collar".
 
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