Men's Clothing Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a few pairs of pants with a similar problem. Partly due to my posture I guess (hips forward, knees locked, etc), they are little loose below the seat and at the back of the thigh, but a little restrictive at the front of the thigh when I sit or walk (when they sort of pull from above the knee through to the fork). They seem to be made for standing still only!

Is there anything that can be altered to ease this issue at all? I suspect it is a bit like jacket shoulders and cannot be addressed realistically, but I might be missing a trick. Certain solutions, like letting out the crotch at the fork, will help a little at the front I suppose but will only cause the rear to be even more saggy.

I think the issue is perhaps more technically to do with the 'front-back balance' of the pants and the angle and shape of the seat. My guess is that I need a straighter seat seam (for flat seat, to stop the looseness here) combined with more room at the fork (to allow necessary room at the front for motion), but I may well be entirely wrong. Views would be very welcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,969 Posts
When pressing the front creases, towards the top, pull the fronts to stretch them. The lower seat of the pants can be shrunk and down the back leg aways. The front is lengthened and the back is shortened.
In cutting the center back would be shortened. The hip pockets sewn in. With the pockets already sewn in can't really lower that part much, or the pockets will be off level to much.
Stretching and shrinking can achieve some.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks WA. I wasn't aware that some of the benefits of ironwork in shrinking and stretching could be acheived on a finished garment. I suppose it is obvious how one might hope to stretch (by pulling), but how does one go about shrinking?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,969 Posts
A damp cloth between iron and garment.
Wet enough to do the job. If to wet it makes the job longer and may damage the cloth.
Nowadays some tailors have some water and a clean paint brush. The water turns into steam and that is how it spreads under the iron.
There are videos on YouTube where you can see them quickly dabbing the water on. Some tailors put the iron right on the garment. Some can be done from the inside, which is safer when a press cloth is not use.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top