Silly question about shirt design

Discussion in 'Andy's Fashion Forum' started by Jainarayan, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. delicious_scent

    delicious_scent Senior Member

    906
    Canada
    Saskatchewan
    Regina
    This is exactly why I love Spier & Mackay's OCBD's. The top button(not the collar button) is higher than most shirts.

    As for the second paragraph, it probably saves the company money by not doing that.
     
  2. delicious_scent

    delicious_scent Senior Member

    906
    Canada
    Saskatchewan
    Regina
    Could it be an armhole issue OP? I recall my Charles Tyrwhitt shirts having huge armholes, even for the slim fit shirts.

    Whenever I raised my arms, the shirt would ride up quite a bit.
     
  3. Searching_Best_Fit

    Searching_Best_Fit Senior Member

    771
    Canada
    Ontario
    Mississauga
    If you are handy with hand sewing, you might want to check for snap buttons or hooks so that you can put that at the bottom of the placket. Since these should not come out when wearing, there is no need for them to be with button holes and buttons.

    That said, a current sewing machine should have program and seat to sew button holes and cutting a new hole is not that a big deal. There should be no reason why a tailor cannot do that for you, whether free or with charge.
     
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  4. WA

    WA Honors Member

    United States
    WA
    Bellingham
    Lots of home sewing machines have a buttonhole stitch. Practice it few times on scrape cloth. Even if not perfect it will be out of sight, anyway.

    Old shirts were made for one to three buttons. The placket only went down so far. They were shirts that were pulled over the head. A button loop was added for the button on the trousers to button to. These shirts always stayed tucked in. They still make some of these styles of shirts for black and white tie. The coat front that is worn today 118 years ago were kinda new.
     
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