Bespoke shirt, expert opinion needed

Discussion in 'Andy's Fashion Forum' started by macaroni, May 21, 2009.

  1. macaroni

    macaroni Active Member with Corp. Privileges

    104
    I have just learned about a new bespoke shirt maker in my city (Warsaw/ Poland). Emanuel Berg is on the market for some 15 years making RTW and MTM shirts, but they are doing bespoke since recently. This is the sample shirt. They do test shirt with firs order, the fabric is DJ Anderson, MOP buttons, spit yoke etc. One thing I see for the first time is the reinforced placket. Can anyone explain what difference does it make comparing to ordinary placket? The maker seems to be very proud of this feature of the shirt, maybe they're making much ado about nothing?

    What do you think about this shirt?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    the placket reinforcement

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2009
  2. dmhamiltontx

    dmhamiltontx Starting Member

    24
    That shirt looks very nice to me. Excellent materials. The real advantage of a bespoke shirt is the fit. I assume they are making you a bespoke pattern? So, without seeing the shirt on you, it's hard to say how well they did. In regard to the reinforced gusset, I don't see value in that feature. Lots of consumers think it's important so I think shirtmakers feel pressured to do it. Hope this helps.
     
  3. Carioca Canuck

    Carioca Canuck New Member

    30
    I'm surprised they couldn't line up the stripes in pic #6 on the shoulder/arm seam.
     
  4. Cottonshirt

    Cottonshirt Active Member with Corp. Privileges

    259
    There really is so very little difference between one shirt and another that a lot of makers feel that they have to give the hard sell to some "special" feature of their shirts. I saw one website where they boasted that their buttons had four holes, yes count them, one, two, three, four holes. "We only use four-hole mother of pearl buttons" as though that makes your shirt easier to iron or something.

    Having said that, a placket is a point in a garment that takes some wear and tear so reinforcing it is not a daft idea. My personal opinion is that the standard shirt sleeve placket is a well designed feature that is more than up to the task it faces and doesn't require a loop of buttonhole thread to reinforce it. But if you like the exclusive feel of this "unique feature" then why not. It certainly doesn't hurt. But I don't like the row of hand stitches leading up to it and I'm confused by their purpose. I'm sure Carl or Alex will explain it and I'll feel stupid for not seeing it myself.

    I like: The low angle in the split yoke. I have never thought of making them with such a low angle but having seen it I've decided I like it and will try it on one of my own.

    I'm not a fan of those reinforcing gussets at the bottom of the side seams; they seem an unecessary feature to me and no shirt I've ever seen has failed at that point.

    I'm also not a fan of the extremely wide topstitching on the cuffs, but I do like their shape, and at this point I noticed the pattern matching on the sleeve placket which is not a trivially easy thing to do. I'm sure most readers will not know that the sleeve placket is actually sewn onto the inside of the sleeve, then turned through the opening onto the outside before being folded and sewn down. So getting the pattern to match when you are sewing the placket to the "other" side gets kudos points from me.

    You didn't mention the price. Is it worth someone going to Warsaw for the weekend to get fitted for five of these shirts?

    Nice pictures. Thanks.
     
  5. macaroni

    macaroni Active Member with Corp. Privileges

    104
    This shirt wasn't made for me. This is a sample shirt I was shown. It is possible I will be ordering one of those shirts, if so, i will post photos of a shirt on me.
     
  6. macaroni

    macaroni Active Member with Corp. Privileges

    104
    I feel the same.

    I don't have a single shirt with a split yoke, does it really make a difference in fit?

    500- 600 $ depending on the fabric. I guess this is about the same Charvet demands for their shirts. And Paris is definitely a nicer city to go for a weekend. Warsaw is worth going to for bespoke shoes. Classic style, excellent quality, and prices hard to beat.
     
  7. Cottonshirt

    Cottonshirt Active Member with Corp. Privileges

    259
    It can do. None of us are symmetrical, but most of us are almost so it doesn't really matter. But some people have one arm longer than the other or one shoulder rounder than the other or carry one shoulder more forward than the other. For these people a split yoke allows each shoulder to be fit separately whilst maintaining balance in the rest of the shirt. For the rest of us it is just a stylistic issue and for shirtmakers it is a showoff thing when the patterns match. When I do it I split only the outer yoke, the yoke facing is still cut in one piece so it is obviously a "style" thing rather than a "fit" thing.

    If you're buying shirts the split yoke will affect fit only if you buy bespoke. You'll never notice the difference in a RTW.
     
  8. macaroni

    macaroni Active Member with Corp. Privileges

    104
    Thanks for the answer Cottonshirt! Very helpful.
     
  9. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Super Member


    Many shirts don't. It requires excess material and also depends on fit issues. In many cases- you have to pick where you want things to align.

    At any rate- that seems aq nicely made shirt
     
  10. ccffm1

    ccffm1 Active Member with Corp. Privileges

    169
    Germany
    Hesse
    Frankfurt
    Wait, are we talking about 500 to 600 US$ a pop? It´s a nice shirt, but probably not 500 $ nice. I believe Emanuel Berg shirts are WAY cheaper here in Germany.
     

Share This Page