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  1. #1
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    Default Why I Wear Non-Iron Shirts

    I stumbled across and thought you gentlemen might find it humorous.

    Other than the fact that wearing them makes it makes it easier to sell them, Esquire nicely illustrates why (in roundabout terms) I like non-iron shirts:

    http://www.esquire.com/style/endorsementshirt0507
    "Play like a champion today."


  2. #2
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    I wear all cotton, non-iron dress shirts for one reason, they look better. My brand of choice is Lands End. People talk about them being hot in the summer but I can't really tell much of a difference.

    I have quite a few shirts that must be ironed, primarily OCBDs; but these are worn mainly with jeans. I think the wrinkles look good with the casual nature of jeans, especially when worn with a tweed jacket.

    Cruiser

  3. #3
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    I find ironing rather relaxing and don't mind doing it once a week. It is a small price to pay for a more comfortable shirt.

  4. #4
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    Hmm, only wrinkles I notice are around the arms. Which should ideally be covered by the jacket anyway.

    That said, I usually wear non-irons because they require less upkeep. If I'm feeling particularly lazy I can just throw them in the dryer rather than really ironing them. Then again, I'm still a student so I'm not expected to look pristine.

  5. #5
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    I agree they tend to look nice, but I always feel like I'm wearing plastic sheeting instead of cotton. My skin is easily irritated by them, too. But then, my skin is easily irritated. If you can wear them without discomfort, I think they make some sense. But... remember that you are wearing chemicals.

  6. #6
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    Non-iron shirts do have their function in today's hectic world and frazzled lifestyles. But nothing beats a freshly pressed crisp cotton shirt.
    Help! My inner brat is running amok again.

  7. #7
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    I don't think the article's author has made a good fist of explaining the benefits of a non-iron shirt. He appears to suggest that the main advantage is that you can keep wearing it day aftere day because it won't wrinkle.
    I have worn the damn thing day after day until even I am disgusted.
    Ugh.

    If you wear a traditional shirt all day, and claim to be a paid-up member of a civilised society, you will have to change it at the end of the day. Perhaps before, if you are going out again in the evening. By then, it will have acquired some wrinkles, but not many. Wash it, hang it up to dry for a day or so, and then iron it while it's slightly damp. As I understand it, the non-iron shirt should be gently tumble dried on a low heat setting in order to activate the non-iron finishes have been incorporated into the cloth. This is where it gains its advantage, i.e., in the time it takes to be washed, dried and ready to wear again. But perhaps I've misunderstood this as I don't use non-iron shirts.

    But I can fully understand why people who don't have the time or perhaps the inclination to bother with the palaver associated with properly processing traditional cotton shirts adopt non-iron shirts. It seems like a perfectly reasonable compromise to me. And a lot better, I think, than handing over your fine cotton shirts to the depradations of a local laundry and its inflatable shirt dummy.

    But by focusing the non-iron shirt's ability to look unwrinkled day after day even when not washed he has, unwittingly perhaps, revealed one reason why they are looked on with some suspicion.

  8. #8
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    Non-iron shirts. Yeccchhhh. They feel terrible, they look awful. They always tend to look not-quite-pressed when worn with business or formal clothes and too stiff when worn casually. They look like they're made of plastic sheeting. A real cotton shirt is to be worn three ways:

    1) Cleaned at a reputable cleaners.
    2) Washed and ironed yourself.
    3) Casually non-ironed (but hung dry then given a quick tumble to soften the creases).

    Professionally manufactured non-iron shirts are to be worn one way:
    1) Not at all.

    bimmerzimmer

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bimmerzimmer View Post
    Non-iron shirts. Yeccchhhh. They feel terrible, they look awful. They always tend to look not-quite-pressed when worn with business or formal clothes and too stiff when worn casually. They look like they're made of plastic sheeting. A real cotton shirt is to be worn three ways:

    1) Cleaned at a reputable cleaners.
    2) Washed and ironed yourself.
    3) Casually non-ironed (but hung dry then given a quick tumble to soften the creases).

    Professionally manufactured non-iron shirts are to be worn one way:
    1) Not at all.

    bimmerzimmer
    I fully agree, with 1) and 1) being my choices.

  10. #10
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    Bimmerzimmer, outside of really enjoying your name, I'd like to give you a big fat thumbs up. Non-iron shirts: the vinyl siding of torso coverings.

  11. AskAndy Encyclopedia 2  (Desktop - Inline 2)
  12. #11
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    And I wanna say more, beginning with my plunging respect for dear friend Cruiser. (Cruz: how could you?) Non-iron cottons look exactly like 60/40. Feel that way too (tho they tend not to fuzz up after washing). The same witches brew into which they're dunked that keeps them from wrinkling also prevents a hot iron from imprinting a sharp crease. Ugh. (I borrowed the ugh from Finian, above, thanks.) Starch, an apparent anathema here to maybe all but me, helps a bit.
    Then all at once he was standing there.
    So sure of himself, head in the air.

    Running Scared --- Roy Orbison '61

  13. #12
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    I've looked at shirts from both sides now...

    From up and down, but still somehow,

    It's non-iron illusions I recall,

    I really don't know shirts at all!!

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by WouldaShoulda View Post
    I've looked at shirts from both sides now...

    From up and down, but still somehow,

    It's non-iron illusions I recall,

    I really don't know shirts at all!!

    Thanks alot, Earworm. Now I'm gonna have to walk around all day with that awful, drippy 60s ditty playing over and over in my head and slowly eating away at whatever shreds and shards of sanity I have left. The horror . . . .
    PJC in NoVa

  15. #14
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    I have been wearing non-iron shirts for a while now and I like them. I recently bought several from BB along with one other luxury cotton shirt. I think that the luxury cotton shirt feels nicer but I still prefer the non-irons. When I preach I will sometimes take off my jacket (is was 110 here yesterday) and the non-irons look better.

  16. #15
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    LOL. Gentlemen: I submit to you that the best solution to this moral(?) dilemma confronting us all, is to buy and wear nothing but 'must be ironed' shirts and get yourselves an old fashioned wife/significant other...who does laundry and finds ironing to be relaxing, almost a Zen-like experience. In so doing, we will be keeping faith with our true beliefs and still be looking good!

  17. #16
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    It's OK to have one, maybe two, non-irons for emergencies. We all, or most of us, find us without an ironed shirt in the morning and behind schedule. But, except for that, they belong on the ash heap. A dress shirt with slight wrinkles in the afternoon is, IMHO, becoming a symbol of status and class.

  18. #17
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    About seven years ago BB introduced me to their non-iorn shirts. At first I thought that is was something like the "Brooksweave" of the '60's. It is not. The non-iron shirft that I have are soft breathe well and are an all around good value. Yes I do iron them but when I travel they get washed and hung. I have even had BB make them up in their select shirts.

  19. #18
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    Bah. Non-iron shirts are the antithesis of style. I don't want to wear plastic, and I don't want to wear a shirt that has been treated to make it look and act like plastic.

  20. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by CuffDaddy View Post
    I don't want to wear plastic, and I don't want to wear a shirt that has been treated to make it look and act like plastic.
    I agree on this point, and this is precisely why I don't wear plastic patent leather shoes; however, my non-iron shirts neither look nor feel like plastic. They are actually quite soft, much softer than a shirt that has been starched. If they weren't I wouldn't wear them either.

    Cruiser

  21. #20
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    From Esquire:
    If you're the kind of guy who goes to an Italian tailor who makes shirts out of the ass hairs of the endangered Mongolian truffle goat, like certain editors of this magazine, then obviously the L.L. Bean wrinkle-resistant shirt is not for you. It's thick and a bit stiff and not the greatest thing for a hot summer day. When I put it on, I always say a little prayer of gratitude that I'm not cursed (like certain editors of this magazine) with extremely sensitive nipples.
    "Play like a champion today."


  22. #21

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    I wear non-iron shirts about 3/4 of the time. I will admit they do not feel or look as good as a nicely ironed (not starched) shirt. But they don't feel bad to me, either.

    I find them acceptable on days in my office where I know I will likely not have to meet anyone, and I think it's a decent trade-off between less ironing in general, and more flexibility about when I do my laundry and ironing.

    However, the main reason why I wear them is because I am uncouth and I wear non-iron shirts twice before washing. Sometimes three times if I can get away with it. I do not sweat much and sitting in an air-conditioned office the shirts really don't get very dirty under those conditions.

    It really cuts down on the laundry and helps me conserve some water and energy.

  23. #22
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    Wow, you guys need to get out more! Have you ever handled CT non-iron shirts that have been laundered a few times? Silky and nice, you wouldn't know they were non-iron. You are supposed to line hand them, and they come out looking smooth and drapey. BB, JAB and LE non-iron can be a little bit stiffer, but no more so than a lightly starched shirt from the laundry. Actually, I can't tell my recent LE non-iron from some older LE must iron, except for the wrinkles!

    I used to get all my shirts pressed way back when I wore suits every day, and I never thought of my must iron shirts as being particularly comfortable (was probably wearing cheap shirts though). If you do wear a suit, all you see is the collar, a bit of the front and a bit of cuffs anyway. Why spend 20 minutes ironing that shirt?

    In a business casual office, wearing a nice silky non-iron shirt that doesn't get wrinkled is great! Looks perfectly natural to me. Maybe I am missing something though, since I haven't worn expensive sea island must iron shirts lovingly ironed by hand, but neither of those things is likely to happen.
    Last edited by J.Marko; August 4th, 2010 at 08:56.
    De gustibus non disputandum - if that were true, this forum would not exist!
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    W. C. Fields (avatar picture)

  24. #23
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    What's this 20 minute baloney? A shirt can be ironed quite well in 6-8 minutes, provided the ironer is practiced and the shirt was not allowed to dry while tied in knots.

  25. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by CuffDaddy View Post
    What's this 20 minute baloney? A shirt can be ironed quite well in 6-8 minutes, provided the ironer is practiced and the shirt was not allowed to dry while tied in knots.
    Ok, you caught me exaggerating, but doesn't Kabbaz have some 40 minute figure for properly ironing a shirt? Playing off that I guess.
    De gustibus non disputandum - if that were true, this forum would not exist!
    Me

    Attitude is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than what people do or say. It is more important than appearance, giftedness, or skill.
    W. C. Fields (avatar picture)

  26. #25
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    I think there are a lot of things to say about this article. First and foremost is it comes from Esquire. These are the same people pushing the extremely skinny lapels and suits at the moment, so these people are going to be the people who push anything to get advertisers. As such, they aren't to be given too much credibility. I find it odd that they are pushing non-iron shirts at this time because this non-iron technology, if one will call it that, has been out since at least the year 2000 (maybe?). Really this technology should be called "wrinkles less" or "easier to iron" because wrinkles will always occur, and no shirt out of the iron or off the clothes line unless it is imbued by the hands of God will look as pressed as an ironed one.

    However, it is rather funny to see all these purists clamoring on about the softness of a traditional shirt and the supposed roughness of a non-iron shirt. For those of us who put on a suit and tie everyday to sit in an office everyday, it really comes down to how much time you have on your hand. When you are waking up at six thirty in the morning and then rushing the kids into the car for schools, it really comes down to how much you are really caring about the shirt you put on. The non-iron shirt is really just more reliable compared to its traditional cotton counter part because it never has to be worried about. I wash them with my regular shirts and have my wife iron them as usual. She rather likes it because it is a lot faster to iron. Then when you are carrying kids and backpacks to cars and school, you really have one less thing to care about. I don't think anyone can argue with that.

    Lastly, if your skin is so sensitive that the non-iron technology is too harsh, then non-iron is the last thing that should be on your mind.

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